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eve
Sep 15th, 2004, 08:04 AM
http://www.liveexportshame.com/ to read the latest.

eve
Oct 4th, 2004, 08:50 AM
The number of live cattle exported abroad from Australia slumped to the lowest level in 6 years, for the month of August 04. But they were worth 38 percent more, according to the Bureau of Statistics figures.

Strong demand from China for dairy cows pushed the value up to $48 million. During August, 9,000 dairy cows were shipped to China, for a total value of $18 million, that fuelled the increase in total value of exports for the month compared to last year. However, the number of cattle shipped was down 10 per cent on last year to the lowest August total since 1998, of 56,630 head.

For so long China has avoided being a dairy country, but it seems that situation is changing, and is likely to grow exponentially. Poor cows! :mad:

eve
Oct 25th, 2004, 08:10 AM
The abc on-line today reports a shipment of sheep and cattle is expected to leave Fremantle for the Middle East today, despite being held up by animal rights campaigners. Members of Animals Australia staged a protest to mark last year's Cormo Express incident, where 52,000 sheep spent 3 months at sea, after being rejected by Saudi Arabia.

But they're failing to acknowledge improvements made since the incident, says John Edwards from the WA Livestock Exporters Association. "Disappointing to see these groups continuing in the manner that they are. We hear nothing different from them."

eve
Oct 28th, 2004, 10:09 AM
Analyst predicts end of live export trade (reported at abc-on line today)

A leading grain analyst and woolgrower has delivered a broadside at the sheep and wool industries, for their response to animal rights activists. Malcolm Bartholomaeus says he's disappointed at the industry's low-key reaction, to the move by the group PETA to force a boycott of Australian wool in the US. PETA objects to the export of sheep, but Mr Bartholomaeus says that trade is going to die a natural death in the next few years anyway.

"Why put demand for wool at significant risk in the short term, to support an industry which is going into a sunset phase anyway. Sometimes our first loss is our best loss. If we have to take radical actions, and it's going to cost the industry some money; maybe if we take that loss on the chin right now, at maybe a lot smaller loss than trying to claw back demand for wool over, say, a 20-year period."

Sounds good to me! :)

gertvegan
Oct 28th, 2004, 10:24 AM
Thanks for the update eve.

eve
Nov 22nd, 2004, 02:43 PM
There are still problems with this industry, but apparently being taken care of. The abc on-line today reported that the live export industry and the federal government are playing down an incident which stranded more 3000 cattle off the coast of Jordan.

The cattle, destined for Israel, were at the centre of a dispute over feedlot space at the Jordanian Port of Aqaba. James Martin reports: "The cattle have now began unloading after the initial 20,000 sheep and 5000 cattle were dispatched from the MV Maysora eight days ago. The federal government says a backup plan has now been enacted, and the remaining 3300 animals loaded at Fremantle are entering a different feedlot at Jordan. They're understood to be in good condition in temperatures ranging from five to 29 degrees. There have been no deaths on board since the first unloading, but the port dispute has been significant enough for the industry's animal welfare counselor, Kerin Johar, to be dispatched from Dubai to inspect the vessel."

eve
Dec 2nd, 2004, 09:45 AM
The Federal Government today signed a memorandum of understanding with the United Arab Emirates (UAE) covering the live animal trade. The UAE is Australia's sixth-largest market for live exports, worth about $15 million a year.

The memorandum includes a guarantee that animals would be accepted into a quarantine area in the country if there were any concerns about their health.

It is designed to prevent a similar situation to one which occurred last year when Saudi Arabia rejected a shipment of 50,000 Australian sheep, leaving them stranded in the Persian Gulf. The Government has since banned live animal trade with Saudi Arabia until a similar agreement can be reached.

eve
Dec 8th, 2004, 08:46 AM
International Livestock Exports exports a million sheep and 70,000 cattle a year. LiveCorp says it'll consult with government in the New Year, to see if it can bring the cattle rate back in the line with other classes of livestock.

The Livecorp legislation was vehemently opposed in the Senate by the Australian Democrats, who moved amendments which could have forced an end to livestock exports. Democrats Leader Senator Andrew Bartlett makes no apology for attempting to stop the trade.

"The real concern the Democrats have is that the Government and the Opposition continue to press ahead with promoting and trying to expand this trade, when the community concern in Australia, and as we've seen internationally, will just continue to grow: so the industry will just be perpetually fighting this battle that I don't think it can win or should win."

Good onya Andrew :)

eve
Dec 22nd, 2004, 08:12 AM
Woolgrowers are being called on to defend their industry in the courtroom, in an escalation of legal proceedings against animal rights group PETA. Australian Wool Innovation wants around 300 growers, who believe their income will be hurt by PETA's campaign to stop retailers buying Australian wool, to come forward.

But the move has come under fire from rebel wool group, the Australian Wool Growers Association, which believes farmers will be liable for hefty costs if the case is lost. Chairman Chick Olsson says growers should reject any offer to join the action.

But chairman of Australian Wool Innovation Ian McLachlan says growers will be indemnified against any costs should the legal action fail. He says the battle against PETA is now the biggest issue the wool industry has ever faced, and in the past few days, growers have been rushing to join the action to help save their industry.

Meanwhile woolgrowers are being warned not to dismiss PETA as a minor threat. Agribusiness advisor Andrew Smith says PETA is a formidable opponent, and the wool boycott has the potential to hurt sales.

Mr Smith, from PPB Rural Services, says the wool industry should set up a meeting with the activists to try to resolve their differences, before heading to the courts.

eve
Dec 27th, 2004, 08:24 AM
In today's 'The Australian' paper, there's a very nice letter from an American woman, on the subject of live exports. Her name is Virginia Canino of Sth Orange, NJ, who writes that she simply believes that as we are hoping to move towards a more evolved way of living, we might all begin by being considerate to the helpless among us.

I thought that was well said.

feline01
Dec 27th, 2004, 04:09 PM
In today's 'The Australian' paper, there's a very nice letter from an American woman, on the subject of live exports. Her name is Virginia Canino of Sth Orange, NJ, who writes that she simply believes that as we are hoping to move towards a more evolved way of living, we might all begin by being considerate to the helpless among us.

I thought that was well said.

That's right by where I work. NJ is a small state but fortunately, has a vocal and active animal rights population. Hence, no bear hunt this year :D :D :D .

eve
Dec 28th, 2004, 08:40 AM
Yes you are fortunate, feline01, as it can be quite dismaying to live among meat eaters who care nothing at all for nonhuman animals, and most people here love fishing. There are no vegans to my knowledge, though it is always surprising to me when I go shopping in the supermarket to see pkts of tofu, soymilk, homas, etc. Who's buying it, apart from me? :D
By the way, what do you mean by 'rage against the machine'? Are you a luddite?

feline01
Dec 28th, 2004, 02:56 PM
I should clarify, it's not that my state is so pro-animal. It's because there are so many hunters, fishermen and people who want to murder deer because the deer are eating the landscaping on the million dollar home they built next to a heavily-wooded reservation or kill all the geese because they poop that there is such a strong animal rights movement here.

Rage Against the Machine is a music group with political messages. I guess they would be considered punk/heavy metal sort. I wouldn't describe myself as a luddite per se but I would like to live more simply.

eve
Jan 24th, 2005, 07:40 AM
Since June 22nd 2004 the Director-General has held the responsibility for investigating Animals Australia's legal complaint that a shipment of sheep aboard the livestock vessel MV Al Kuwait that departed Fremantle for the Middle East, breached the WA Animal Welfare Act.

The evidentiary basis of the complaint has been supported by expert legal opinions and assessed by the State Solicitor, yet Director-General has failed to instigate an investigation in the 6 months leading up to a hotly contested state election. "It is important to recognise that Animals Australia is not seeking the introduction of new laws. The Parliament of Western Australia has enacted laws for the protection of animals. The rule of law requires that those who are entrusted by Parliament with the enforcement of those laws carry out their obligations and duties," said Mr Martin Bennett of Bennett & Co Barristers and Solicitors.

"Had this alleged breach of WA legislation related to 100,000 human victims there is no way that 13 months later it would remain uninvestigated. Animals Australia will ensure that every legal avenue is explored to call those to account who are entrusted with enforcing animal welfare legislation - including lodging a complaint against the Director-General with the WA Crime and Corruption Commission," said Ms Oogjes, Executive Director of Animals Australia.

The vessel MV Al Kuwait, capable of carrying over 100,000 sheep, is currently in Fremantle on its 10th return visit since the lodging of the complaint. At least 3 million sheep have left WA on live export vessels potentially in breach of WA's Animal Welfare Act since Animals Australia first lodged their controversial complaint in December 2003. "It is outrageous that the Al Kuwait has been allowed to return to Fremantle on 10 occasions to load hundreds of thousands of sheep for the Middle East in the face of serious allegations. The Kuwaitis and their Australian agents have continued their business under the nose of authorities who are meant to be enforcing WA's animal welfare legislation," said Ms Oogjes

Animals Australia's Supreme Court legal action on the politically sensitive live export issue will not be welcomed by a Gallop government seeking to avoid controversy in the lead-up to the February 26th 2005 WA state election.

Geoff
Jan 28th, 2005, 06:39 AM
Supreme Court order granted in WA live export case
Director-General found to have case to answer
Leading WA solicitor Martin Bennett, acting for peak animal welfare body Animals Australia, successfully argued today in the Supreme Court of Western Australia for the granting of an order nisi regarding the failure of the WA Government to act on Animals Australia’s live animal export complaint.
As a result the Director General of the Department of Local Government and Regional Development, Cheryl Gwilliam, will be ordered to appear before a Full Court of the Supreme Court of Western Australia.
The Order calls on Ms Gwilliam to show cause before the Supreme Court why she should not be compelled to carry out her duty under the Animals Welfare Act 2002 and determine in respect to Animals Australia’s live animal export complaint, whether to commence proceedings against appropriate persons for contravention of that Act.
Animals Australia lodged papers in the Supreme Court on Monday 24th January 2005 seeking a Writ of Mandamus, naming the Director-General of the Department of Local Government and Regional Development, Cheryl Gwilliam, as the respondent.
This unprecedented legal action was taken when the Director-General failed after 7 months to instigate an investigation into Animals Australia’s complaint that a live export shipment aboard the livestock vessel MV Al Kuwait in November 2003 breached Section 19 of the Animal Welfare Act.
Section 19 (1) (3) states that it is an offence to “transport an animal in a way that causes or is likely to cause it unnecessary harm”. At least 1000 sheep died on the voyage in question. Evidence was also documented by Animals Australia and Compassion in World Farming (UK) investigators in Kuwait City that sheep during this voyage had suffering injuries and ailments as a result of the transportation.
A comprehensive dossier of evidence with supporting expert legal opinions was provided by Animals Australia to the Director-General.
“We are very pleased that this matter is in the hands of the Supreme Court and that finally we will have the independent body necessary to assess the merits of our complaint, “ said Glenys Oogjes, Executive Director of Animals Australia.
“All expert legal opinions sought have attested to the solid foundation of evidence on which Animals Australia’s complaint is based. It is therefore inconceivable and deeply disturbing that it remains un-investigated.”
“Since this complaint was first lodged with accompanying expert legal opinions supporting its merits, millions of sheep have been allowed to depart from Western Australia on live export vessels potentially in breach of WA laws,” said Ms Oogjes.

veganblue
Apr 11th, 2005, 11:32 AM
Little late but still a great development.


Live trade must end: RSPCA
Friday, 8 April 2005

In a brave address at the WA Farmers Federation (WAFF) annual conference last week, RSPCA president Lynn Bradshaw told producers the live export of animals is cruel, costs Australian jobs, and is unnecessary.

"The RSPCA has long maintained that livestock should be slaughtered as close as possible to the point of production, because of the suffering associated with their transport," Ms Bradshaw said.

Ms Bradshaw said exported livestock could be humanely slaughtered in Australian abattoirs, which would create jobs and build more resilient economies in rural and regional communities.

She said research and international experience, such as the banning of live export of lambs in New Zealand, had shown banning the trade did not need to adversely affect farmers.

Ms Bradshaw warned farmers not to buy into the myth that markets in South East Asia and the Middle East demand only live animals for religious or cultural purposes.

She said Australia already exports chilled and frozen meat to every significant market for live exports, and this means Australian meat is competing with Australian live exports in the same overseas markets.

"It was Gandhi who said, 'The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated,'" Ms Bradshaw said.

"The continuation of the live export trade is a sad reflection on our country, and is hardly representative of the wishes of the vast majority of Australians.

"Producer groups and farmers' federations must come to realize that 85pc of the community supports the RSPCA, and it is the Australian community which must be satisfied over animal welfare issues."

SOURCE: Farm Weekly, April 7 issue.

eve
May 7th, 2005, 08:15 AM
Good news about those who protested at the live sheep exports. The Jury acquitted Ralph Hahnheuser, of Adelaide. :D
http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200505/s1362051.htm

Cal
May 8th, 2005, 02:58 AM
Good news about those who protested at the live sheep exports. The Jury acquitted Ralph Hahnheuser, of Adelaide. :D
Yes, it is good news. I saw it on the telly last night. :)

adam antichrist
May 8th, 2005, 06:17 AM
Congratulations to Ralph, and I was very pleased to see him continue to fight the conviction despite his recent and very public exuent from the AR movement...

eve
May 8th, 2005, 07:54 AM
I like this website for the sheep: http://www.savethesheep.com/

veganblue
May 8th, 2005, 09:21 AM
A couple of news articles on the ham attack case.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200505/s1362051.htm

Jury acquits sheep feedlot contaminator

A man who contaminated a sheep feed lot at Portland in Victoria's west, has been found not guilty of deliberately setting out to cause economic loss.

A County Court jury in Geelong unanimously ruled that Ralph Hahnheuser, of Adelaide, was motivated by a desire to save the sheep from export when he spread ham through their feed and water two years ago.

Mr Hanhueser's colleague Mark Pearson, from the Animal Liberation Group, says his intentions were noble.

"His intent was not to cause economic harm but in fact to prevent suffering to animals," he said.

"That was clearly the intent in his mind and therefore he was released a free man."

But Davis Peddie, who owns the feed lot at Portland, says the decision astounds him.

"I can't understand how a man who cost companies - legitimate businesses - millions of dollars can walk away completely free," he said.

"I don't understand the system."

Farmers believe a jury's decision will see an escalation in activities designed to sabotage the live export trade.

The Victorian Farmers Federation's Simon Ramsay says he fears the decision will see a raft of similar incidents.

"That was our fear from the start - that if this case wasn't successful and there was a not guilty verdict found, the animal liberationists would take advantage of that and immediately seek license to go out and commit unlawful acts," he said.

Animal rights activists across Australia will meet soon to discuss escalating their campaign against the live export trade.

Mr Pearson says most of the animal rights and welfare organisations across Australia will meet in three weeks.

"We're going to have a major meeting in order to discuss how we're going to escalate the campaign and intensify the campaign, particularly in the light of the Government permitting the opening up the trade to Saudi Arabia yesterday," he said.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200505/s1362051.htm

Jury acquits sheep feedlot contaminator

A man who contaminated a sheep feed lot at Portland in Victoria's west, has been found not guilty of deliberately setting out to cause economic loss.

A County Court jury in Geelong unanimously ruled that Ralph Hahnheuser, of Adelaide, was motivated by a desire to save the sheep from export when he spread ham through their feed and water two years ago.

Mr Hanhueser's colleague Mark Pearson, from the Animal Liberation Group, says his intentions were noble.

"His intent was not to cause economic harm but in fact to prevent suffering to animals," he said.

"That was clearly the intent in his mind and therefore he was released a free man."

But Davis Peddie, who owns the feed lot at Portland, says the decision astounds him.

"I can't understand how a man who cost companies - legitimate businesses - millions of dollars can walk away completely free," he said.

"I don't understand the system."

Farmers believe a jury's decision will see an escalation in activities designed to sabotage the live export trade.

The Victorian Farmers Federation's Simon Ramsay says he fears the decision will see a raft of similar incidents.

"That was our fear from the start - that if this case wasn't successful and there was a not guilty verdict found, the animal liberationists would take advantage of that and immediately seek license to go out and commit unlawful acts," he said.

Animal rights activists across Australia will meet soon to discuss escalating their campaign against the live export trade.

Mr Pearson says most of the animal rights and welfare organisations across Australia will meet in three weeks.

"We're going to have a major meeting in order to discuss how we're going to escalate the campaign and intensify the campaign, particularly in the light of the Government permitting the opening up the trade to Saudi Arabia yesterday," he said.

eve
May 9th, 2005, 07:11 AM
Why don't you just give a tiny precis plus the url - that way we don't have to wade down the page reading paragraphs for every single sentence, when we can read the whole thing on the abc websites?

eve
May 9th, 2005, 07:14 AM
Latest talks between woolgrowers and Animal Lib - in full at http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200505/s1363192.htm

eve
May 10th, 2005, 08:51 AM
Vets expected to support renewed live exports (from abc on-line 10/05/2005)

The Australian Veterinary Association is expected to support the resumption of live exports to Saudi Arabia at its annual general meeting next week. A motion to remove all support for the live sheep trade is unlikely to succeed, given the group voted strongly against a similar proposal last year.

Read the rest here: http://www.abc.net.au/rural/content/2005/s1364131.htm

eve
May 23rd, 2005, 07:08 AM
Today, Animals Australia's newsletter referred to the failure of the WA government to investigate Animals Australia's 'Al Kuwait' live export complaint alleging that live sheep exports breach the WA Animal Welfare Act.

The government has now announced that it will investigate. It has received both state and federal legal opinions which have confirmed that there is no jurisdictional impediment to the complaint progressing.

We have every confidence that a full investigation will provide the evidence necessary to launch a prosecution that has the potential to end live sheep export from WA.

Today's media release follows:
"WA Government investigates live export cruelty complaint" Peak animal welfare body 'Animals Australia' has applauded the decision by the WA State Government to investigate its benchmark complaint which alleges that live sheep export breaches WA animal protection legislation.

Animals Australia had received expert legal advice that live sheep exports from Fremantle, breached Section 19 (1)(3) of the WA Animal Welfare Act 2002. The Act states that it is an offence to ‘transport an animal in a way that causes or is likely to cause unnecessary harm.’ As a result, in November 2003, investigators from Animals Australia and UK-based group, Compassion in World Farming, travelled to Kuwait where they documented the condition of Australian sheep on arrival of the livestock vessel MV Al Kuwait. The evidence gathered, combined with 20 years of documented research into the known causes of suffering and deaths aboard live sheep vessels, led to Animals Australia lodging a complaint and file of evidence alleging a breach of Section 19 (1) (3) with WA Police.

In June 2004, Animals Australia placed the responsibility for the complaint with the WA govt. In January 2005 Animals Australia commenced proceedings in the WA Supreme Court seeking a Writ of Mandamus in regards to the government’s failure to instigate an investigation.

The State Solicitor’s Office, acting for the Director-General of the Department of Local Government and Regional Development, has advised Animals Australia that the govt is now investigating the complaint.

Ms Oogjes, Executive Director of Animals Australia says:
This investigation is the most significant of any ever undertaken in Australia into an animal welfare complaint. Regardless of the arguments for and against live animal export, if live sheep export is found to breach Western Australia’s animal welfare legislation, it has to end.”