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cxmnz
Mar 18th, 2009, 08:41 PM
Before using them don't you need to "season" them? I don't know much about it but my friend Ms Google seems to have lots to say on the matter:


http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/CastIronPans.htm

Thanks for that link, I got a new one at Xmas which I haven't got round to seasoning yet since all the instructions I could find were either an all day job, or involved lard/bacon/other fatty meat :hmm:

I didn't want to make a hash of it and damage the thing either, I'll have to get on and season it - I'm quite excited about the prospect!

petunia
Mar 18th, 2009, 10:21 PM
ooh i want cast iron pans, i'm told it might help me with my (monthly!) anaemia, i love them, and copper bottomed pans, just can't afford either!


Yes, it can help with iron deficiency, and you can pick one up at a thrift store for a fraction of the store price.

pat sommer
Mar 19th, 2009, 09:00 AM
...and never wash! scrape and heat to smoking. If you live in a damp environment, bad luck, must re-season more frequently.

Aubergine is brilliant in such a pan. Love it in sandwiches.

An inch thick more or less, brush both sides with olive oil lightly and over medium heat give it 3-5min before turning. (This is trial and error first go) On the flip side I like a sprinkle of coriander seed and salt (mmm garlic salt) then turn down to low for 2 min or so.
A nice cheat is to cover the slices with a lid or plate for the first side to steam a bit; second side let it dry out uncovered.

pie
Jun 4th, 2009, 10:59 AM
ooh i'm so cross, my mum has been told by a doctor that she should eat meat because her blood test showed that's she's low on iron, grrrr why can't they suggest alternatives like green leafy stuff and pulses etc, straight away they say 'oh dear you're a vegetarian' bla bla bla, they are so narrow minded!!

harpy
Jun 4th, 2009, 12:31 PM
How annoying. It does vary by doctor though - my mother tends to be anaemic and as far as I know no doctor has ever attempted to tell her to eat meat, and her GP OKd vegetarian iron supplements for her.

I suppose it's true that haem iron (from meat) is more easily absorbed, but if you take the right precautions (like combining iron with vitamin C, and avoiding tea with them) the vegetable sources should do the trick I would have thought.

Has your mum seen these information sheets:

http://www.vegansociety.com/food/nutrition/iron.php
http://www.vegsoc.org/info/iron.html

cedarblue
Jun 4th, 2009, 01:03 PM
i've just had some blood tests for the fatigue i've been experiencing over the past 6 months or so. i've got to go to the docs next monday as iron is one thing that has come back as being low, not sure about anything else yet.

luckily i'm seeing a doctor who, when i went and was veggie, told me that people don't NEED to eat meat - so i'm hoping he will be as helpful this time if there's anything to deal with.

harpy
Jun 4th, 2009, 03:40 PM
Hope you get on OK cedar. Loads of women are anaemic so they shouldn't make a big thing of it. Although it's more of an issue in post-menopausal women like my mother, but she's had loads of tests and they can't find any particular reason for it :confused: Must check if she's been tested for pernicious anaemia.

cedarblue
Jun 7th, 2009, 02:08 PM
thanks, harpers!

pie
Jun 9th, 2009, 11:07 AM
:bigsmile:thanks harpy for those links, never knew dried apricots were high in iron, i'll tell her as she loves them

Ms_Derious
Jul 27th, 2009, 09:17 AM
I bought these for 7 from a second hand store on Saturday
http://img132.imageshack.us/img132/7311/img2511y.th.jpg (http://img132.imageshack.us/i/img2511y.jpg/)

I love them soooooo much :)

I was just wondering how many other people cook in cast iron here? I've found that I really don't like using my old stainless steel pans any more. I've also almost totally stopped using my non-stick stuff as I don't really trust the level of toxicity/carcinogens in non-stick coatings.

*live*&*let*live
Jul 27th, 2009, 10:06 AM
So can you wash them Ms D? If not how will you manage to use them...sorry not being critical just wondering....meat....:eek:
They look nice though, do they work on the same principle as a wok? I always wash mine, I foget so when I get a new one I will try to remember not to. :rolleyes:

Ms_Derious
Jul 27th, 2009, 10:16 AM
Well, the looked pretty well scrubbed when bought them, and I gave them a wash over and then re-seasoned them. I've covered the process over on my blog. This pretty much cleaned any residual meat off of them, down to the level I'd probably encounter if I went over to a omni household/restaurant for dinner.

You can wash cast iron, you just need to make sure you really, really dry it after. If you have your own cast iron, it's best it you don't wash it as the longer you have it the more oils/lipids bond to the pan and give it a non-stick effect. It's not as non-stick as teflon now, but enough that I can make pancakes etc in the pan, and I don't really need to add more than a spritz of spray oil.

fiamma
Jul 27th, 2009, 11:02 AM
Buckwheat pancakes :cool:

DavidT
Jul 27th, 2009, 11:25 AM
Cast iron frying pans are brilliant for bubble-and-squeak!

Once they're clean and dry, a wipe with a kitchen tissue with a little oil on it keeps it looking good. The kitchen tissue goes in the compost of course.

Jiffy
Jul 27th, 2009, 12:41 PM
Well, the looked pretty well scrubbed when bought them, and I gave them a wash over and then re-seasoned them. I've covered the process over on my blog. This pretty much cleaned any residual meat off of them, down to the level I'd probably encounter if I went over to a omni household/restaurant for dinner.

You can wash cast iron, you just need to make sure you really, really dry it after. If you have your own cast iron, it's best it you don't wash it as the longer you have it the more oils/lipids bond to the pan and give it a non-stick effect. It's not as non-stick as teflon now, but enough that I can make pancakes etc in the pan, and I don't really need to add more than a spritz of spray oil.

Mmm. I'll be round for me tea later :smile:

*live*&*let*live
Jul 27th, 2009, 01:27 PM
Thanks Ms D for the advice, can I have a link to your blog for further info.
I think I have the bug now! :)

Ms_Derious
Jul 27th, 2009, 01:33 PM
http://readyveggiecook.blogspot.com/2009/07/pandemonium-cast-iron-excuse.html

The exact post. It's really easy to season the pans. I was also in TK Maxx yesterday and they have a load cast iron pans which are externally coated with enamel, which are apparently better for use of ceramic hobs as they are less scratchy, so if you have one near you pop in :)

*live*&*let*live
Jul 27th, 2009, 01:36 PM
OOOh yes I do AND we have a ceramic hob too THANKS! :smoochie::bigsmile2:

Gorilla
Nov 5th, 2009, 12:48 PM
i've had trouble keeping my iron levels up for quite a few years and recently had blood tests which showed my levels were normal, but on the low side.

thankfully my doctor didn't blame my being vegan as others have in the past! he said i would be ok to take a supplement which i'm doing for now (107% RDA so it shouldn't cause too much of an excess) because i'm still struggling with other issues that make keeping track of my diet quite difficult. if the supplements make a difference i'll hopefully be able to get enough iron from dietary sources eventually.

i'm going to start adding dried parsley to just about everything as apparently it's high in iron :lol:

bellybuddha
Nov 5th, 2009, 01:19 PM
How about floradix? It's been shown to be very effective and without the side effects of iron tablets. Sea kelp, seaweed, pulses (especially when sprouted), chard, curly kale, or any very green leafy vegetables (because of the folic acid content in them) black strap molasses, all very good to increase iron.

Gorilla
Nov 5th, 2009, 01:25 PM
dietary sources don't seem to help, regardless of how much i try to eat. i don't get any side-effects from iron tablets as i've taken them in the past, i just have trouble remembering to take them regularly.

i haven't tried Floradix yet as it seems very expensive, and i'm guessing it tastes awful which wouldn't exactly help with my motivation to take it!

Ms_Derious
Nov 5th, 2009, 04:15 PM
i'm going to start adding dried parsley to just about everything as apparently it's high in iron :lol:

Always be a bit careful with parsley, as it is a mild emmenagogue (an herb which stimulates menstruation) Don't take too much. I used to make a parsley pesto which messed my inner ladycogs up no end.

(P.S Ladycogs is a very scientific term... no sniggering there)

Gorilla
Nov 6th, 2009, 02:24 PM
haha, my 'ladycogs' as you put it are already messed up no end! :rollseyes_ani:

leedsveg
Nov 6th, 2009, 05:19 PM
For those who are iron deficient, take a spoonful of molasses every day. (According to Mark Twain, it doesn't help you live longer, it just seems longer!:D)

leedsveg

kanopa
Oct 25th, 2010, 08:51 PM
My iron levels have always been quite low. The lowest I remember was after one month when I went vegetarian. The doctor then asked me to eat "at least (!!!!) a little bit of read meat, beef for example sometimes..". My mum told her I don't eat meat at all, so she was like "don't complain when you faint..". Then I took some iron and my levels were higher, but I am afraid that if I don't take it they will fall again and I will have to take iron supplements for the rest of my life!