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Misanthrope
May 2nd, 2007, 12:53 AM
Hello.

This may sound a little strange. I just started eating tofu, but I'm having trouble 'stomaching' it. Unlike most, I am not looking to make it into an elegant dish... I'd just like to be able to eat it, quickly, without turning pale. I am most interested in gaining its nutritional benefits. I am currently buying the soft stuff.

I'd greatly appreciate any advice.

harpy
May 2nd, 2007, 04:36 PM
Hello - I usually buy the firm stuff, and marinate it (if it isn't already marinated or smoked) and then use it in something like a Chinese-style stir-fry. It's also nice grilled or roasted, but you do need to flavour it with something as it doesn't have much flavour of its own.

The soft stuff you can use in desserts (e.g. chocolate mousse or cheesecake), pates and so on. I have a recipe for a mushroom pate made with tofu but you don't sound as if you're after recipes?

Good luck. If you really don't like it you don't have to eat it - there's plenty of other nutritious stuff :D

nervine
May 2nd, 2007, 07:46 PM
if you have problems digesting it, stop eating it, listen to your body, i did too, it's a byproduct, not a food imo..

Lorrs
May 2nd, 2007, 09:39 PM
Yah, I just avoid eating it; just cos it's vegan doesn't make it good.

Poison Ivy
May 2nd, 2007, 09:48 PM
I've never liked tofu, no matter how it was cooked....but after seeing this (http://vegweb.com/index.php?topic=8769.msg76700) recipe and mulling it over for quite a while, I decided to give the stuff one last go....I was VERY pleasantly surprised, it was really, really good (but not terribly healthy!):)

eclectic_one
May 2nd, 2007, 10:10 PM
I actually saw a news show on CNN about living longer and tofu was actually mentioned as one of the healthiest foods...most of the "bad" soy foods are the processed "meats" that just use soy isolates. Tofu still has most of the nutritious benefits of soybeans (not all, but most) including fiber and soy isoflavens and protein, so it is healthy. Many cultures/areas that eat lots of tofu are the healthiest. It's just getting a bad name IMO because the meat/dairy industry is trying to "prove" how rotten it is for you.

Anyways...there are some recipes where you puree it to make a sauce or egg-like substitute, if you freeze it first and then defrost it the texture changes, and if you crumble it the texture isn't as negative (like some vegan shepherd's pie recipes I have call for).

Misanthrope
May 3rd, 2007, 12:23 AM
Thanks for the responses.

I have no problem digesting tofu, but getting it down is pretty tough. I work out, and tofu seems like the ideal 'workout food'. I am not a cook, and I'd kind of like to just 'get it down' after a good training session. I think I may try making a shake.

ricky
May 3rd, 2007, 01:38 AM
Misanthrope, you say: "I'd just like to be able to eat it, quickly..." Is eating quickly the reason for discomfort? I like the deep-fried tofu, and I don't even cook it but eat it in a sandwich! Tasty! :)

Mermaid07
May 3rd, 2007, 07:03 AM
you could be the soft tofu in a shake and it will make it creamy maybe with a banana and some peanut butter or berries?

Misanthrope
May 3rd, 2007, 10:41 PM
I managed to finish off my soft tofu and went on to try the medium texture kind. I cooked it on a pan with some kidney beans and soy sauce, and it wasn't too bad.

I'm not a picky guy. I maintain a pretty bland diet without complaints.

zorbed
Aug 20th, 2007, 09:47 PM
Mash it up into little lumps, fry it in a pan with a little soy sauce and black pepper. Chuck it on a plate of toast. Sorted quick scran like.

nervine
Aug 23rd, 2007, 08:06 PM
I actually saw a news show on CNN about living longer and tofu was actually mentioned as one of the healthiest foods...most of the "bad" soy foods are the processed "meats" that just use soy isolates. Tofu still has most of the nutritious benefits of soybeans (not all, but most) including fiber and soy isoflavens and protein, so it is healthy. Many cultures/areas that eat lots of tofu are the healthiest. It's just getting a bad name IMO because the meat/dairy industry is trying to "prove" how rotten it is for you.
you gotta be kidding me

xrodolfox
Aug 25th, 2007, 07:34 AM
I absolutely LOVE tofu.
I don't eat it for health reasons, though. I eat it for taste.

Taste-wise, unless you plan on deep frying battered tofu (yummy), get only the firmest tofu you can find. You can only find tofu of that nature at co-ops in bulk here in the US. The tofu in a sealed box, or the one that comes in a tub with water won't do. You need really really hard tofu.

Then, you can pan fry it. Or freeze it and bake it with Peanut butter and BBQ sauce. Or, if you find a good enough tofu, just eat it straight up, with tomatos and garbanzo beans dressed with olive oil, lemon, and salt.

My kids love it straight up too. Sometimes with a bit of basil and salt... yummy.

It's all about the firmness and type of tofu you buy. Soft is only good for making pies or deep frying chinese style. If you want to see how the latter is done, go to a Chinese place that specializes in deep frying and you'll eat the best tofu EVER. It just won't be that healthy.



I actually saw a news show on CNN about living longer and tofu was actually mentioned as one of the healthiest foods...most of the "bad" soy foods are the processed "meats" that just use soy isolates. Tofu still has most of the nutritious benefits of soybeans (not all, but most) including fiber and soy isoflavens and protein, so it is healthy. Many cultures/areas that eat lots of tofu are the healthiest. It's just getting a bad name IMO because the meat/dairy industry is trying to "prove" how rotten it is for you.

Anyways...there are some recipes where you puree it to make a sauce or egg-like substitute, if you freeze it first and then defrost it the texture changes, and if you crumble it the texture isn't as negative (like some vegan shepherd's pie recipes I have call for).

you gotta be kidding me

I've read that too, including in the SOY (http://www.veganforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=626) thread here (http://www.veganforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=626) at the veganforums.

Tofu, along with tempeh, is different than other forms of soy marketed today, as it is fermented and rather lightly processed. Tofu isn't TVP or soymilk, both of which may have more evidence that counterindicates over consumption.

Like I said, I love tofu, and I eat as much of it as I can. No problems with health here, unless you, like us, count too being overly fertile as a problem. ;)

gogs67
Aug 25th, 2007, 10:30 AM
Hello.

This may sound a little strange. I just started eating tofu, but I'm having trouble 'stomaching' it. Unlike most, I am not looking to make it into an elegant dish... I'd just like to be able to eat it, quickly, without turning pale. I am most interested in gaining its nutritional benefits. I am currently buying the soft stuff.

I'd greatly appreciate any advice.
I noticed that,in the States and Canada the tofu is not nearly as nice as the various types of smoked or marinated brands you get here.That's a pity for you because there are so many tasty dishes you can make with a nice,firm smoked tofu!

zorbed
Aug 25th, 2007, 06:27 PM
I like this hazzlenut tofu... i can't remember who makes it. But it's nice on a butty with salad and maybe mango chutney.

foxytina_69
Aug 28th, 2007, 12:54 AM
I actually saw a news show on CNN about living longer and tofu was actually mentioned as one of the healthiest foods...most of the "bad" soy foods are the processed "meats" that just use soy isolates. Tofu still has most of the nutritious benefits of soybeans (not all, but most) including fiber and soy isoflavens and protein, so it is healthy. Many cultures/areas that eat lots of tofu are the healthiest. It's just getting a bad name IMO because the meat/dairy industry is trying to "prove" how rotten it is for you.

Anyways...there are some recipes where you puree it to make a sauce or egg-like substitute, if you freeze it first and then defrost it the texture changes, and if you crumble it the texture isn't as negative (like some vegan shepherd's pie recipes I have call for).

yes this is true. the longest living people on earth have tofu in their diets.

creativegan
Aug 28th, 2007, 01:51 AM
Hello - I usually buy the firm stuff, and marinate it (if it isn't already marinated or smoked) and then use it in something like a Chinese-style stir-fry. It's also nice grilled or roasted, but you do neeThis is exactly how I love to make it - it's fast and simple. Be sure to squeeze out the tofu liquid first with some paper towels or something so that it can absorb the marinade better. Another way to do it is fry it after you've squeezed out the liquid - it gets nice and crispy that way - then pour some sauce on it afterwards. Yum! I think I'll make some tonight with some shitake shrooms.

bugaboo
Aug 28th, 2007, 09:36 AM
I noticed that,in the States and Canada the tofu is not nearly as nice as the various types of smoked or marinated brands you get here.That's a pity for you because there are so many tasty dishes you can make with a nice,firm smoked tofu!

I'm not sure where you visited in the USA or Canada, but I also have a wonderful variety of smoked and marinated tofus, tempehs, etc. Maybe it's because I live in California, I'm not sure.

Anyway, many people are allergic to soy or are soy-intolerant. That's why packaging usually, but not always, states under the ingredients what kind of allergy-inducing products it contains including soy and wheat. Maybe it would be a good idea to see an allergen physician and get a scratch test. If you don't have medical insurance...just avoid the tofu. Like many people have already said, you don't have to be a vegan who eats tofu or soy.

foxytina_69
Aug 28th, 2007, 07:59 PM
yeah we have tons of tofu here lol. its ridiculous. theres all kinds.

elisiabattell
Feb 2nd, 2008, 07:14 AM
I gave my friend a tofu recipe. She bought soft tofu, and it was meant for extra firm.

Soft tofu has more water, so it doesn't absorb as much flavour. That's why it is usually used in lighter things that have a dominant flavour, like tofu shakes and stuff. Extra firm, you can press it, marinate it, crumble it, and cook it so that it has a texture 22423563464564357 times more desirable than soft tofu. :]

Hope I helped.

sponge
Feb 2nd, 2008, 10:39 PM
I usually press my tofu and then freeze it. After I thaw it, I squeeze tons more water out of it. This makes the texture very dense. In sauces and casseroles, it's actually extremely "chicken-like." :eek:

MillieAnne
Feb 3rd, 2008, 01:12 AM
Okay this works wonders with tofu!
Make sure it is firm and slice it into about 1/4 to 1/2 inch slices and lay out on paper towel and press as much liquid out as possible.
Put it in the freezer and freeze that bajesus out of it.
When you take it out if you plan on marinading then put it in right away. If not then start cooking.
It comes out with a significantly more meaty texture. I hated tofu until I tried this and the texture difference is astounding.

x-SaRaH-x
Feb 5th, 2008, 10:59 PM
tofu the chinese way is the best,
oh i love chinese meals :)

the_marmite_kid
Feb 15th, 2008, 02:58 PM
i was never a fan of tofu but percivered. i now always/mostly freeze tofu and add it to curries, stew, or anything thats liquidy. it absorbs whatever its being cooked in well and its so much nicer to eat. i was never a fan of the texture but this way its more like quorn or something. ive just bought a huge slab of it from the chinese supermarket :D

i didnt realise it was high in calories. how much tofu is too much?

humansituation
Mar 4th, 2008, 06:34 PM
You can get really good basil tofu from health food shops. You can use it in sandwiches or salads or pasta dishes or just on toast with tomato and olive oil. Yum x