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absentmindedfan
Nov 15th, 2005, 03:57 PM
No, priests do it with choirboys.

Mr Flibble
Nov 15th, 2005, 03:58 PM
oh right yes, now i remember

We're still talking about eating chocolates right?

xwitchymagicx
Nov 15th, 2005, 04:34 PM
I can't eat ryvita though! *cries* :(

Roxy
Nov 16th, 2005, 06:26 PM
Why can't you eat ryvita Witchy?

foxytina_69
Nov 17th, 2005, 12:30 AM
because its rye bread so it has gluten. i cant either!

Roxy
Nov 17th, 2005, 07:27 PM
Oh ok. Thanks. I wonder if there is a gluten free Ryvita-type cracker that you could use instead. Planet Organic might have something.

Mr Flibble
Nov 17th, 2005, 07:31 PM
normal ferrero rocher doesn't contain rye ;)

It contains wafer, assumeably made using wheat flour. If you can make wafer using gluten free flour, which I'm guessing is a lot easier than cake/bread, you're onto a winner

foxytina_69
Nov 19th, 2005, 10:30 AM
they sell these gluten free crackers that remind me of soda crackers. i wonder if those would work?

these are them:

http://www.ener-g.com/store/detail.aspx?sn=CrackesAndSnacks&id=70&cat=6

Mr Flibble
Nov 19th, 2005, 10:36 AM
Potentially.

From what I remember (at it's probably about 10 years ago now - eek!), the wafer forms a ball around the centre (chocolate foundant with a hazelnut in very the centre, approx 2cm in diameter), which in turn is coated in chocolate and crushed hazelnut. I'm not sure how making them without the wafer in a ball would affect the satisfying crunch when you bite into one. Of course, getting the wafer to ball shape most likely involves a machine and certainly making the wafer from scratch as opposed to using flat ready made ones. If memory serves, the wafer ball is made in 2 halves, so I guess they have an iron which makes each half, then it's glued together somehow after the centre is inserted (the obvious way being creating the inner balls and they freezing them to hold their shape during construction). Perhaps it would be easier to create a cube shapped one instead?

As for the taste of the wafer itself, it's the thin, crispy, sweet type that's used to adorn icecreams - as opposed to something you'd butter and put cheese/toppings on which in the UK we call a cracker.

twinkle
Nov 19th, 2005, 10:39 AM
I always picked the outside chocolate off first, then pulled the two halves of wafer apart, ate the whole hazelnut then the chocolatey-spread - I remember what MrFlibble describes as chocolate fondant being very like chocolate hazelnut spread such as nutella, though possibly not so thick.

Mr Flibble
Nov 19th, 2005, 10:42 AM
I always picked the outside chocolate off first, then pulled the two halves of wafer apart, ate the whole hazelnut then the chocolatey-spread

snap! Reverse engineering things can be tasty! When I was revising in the library at university I used to get bourbon biscuits from the campus shop as they were one of the only vegan things they sold. There was a bin by ever desk and I used to use my teeth to take the top layer of biscuit off, chuck it in the bin, lick the foundant out the centre, then throw away the bottom biscuit layer :D


I remember what MrFlibble describes as chocolate fondant being very like chocolate hazelnut spread such as nutella, though possibly not so thick.

From what I remember it was just regular cheap tesco value chocolate hazlenut spread. Not runny but not hard. This is why I always used to think they were rather low budget/tacky and overpriced for what they are. There was no praline or anything fancy about or in the foundant.

Smoothie
Jun 23rd, 2006, 11:09 AM
i just added 10-15 finely chopped hazelnuts and WAUW - it's soo amazing.

vegan1969
Jun 23rd, 2006, 11:24 AM
With these recipes ambassador you are spoiling us!


'With these ferrero roche Mrs Doyle, you are really spoiling us"

we have ryvita here in the states so i think i'll try this recipe because i made a similar recipe for recees cups that called for graham crackers and i thought it didn't sound right until i made them, they were right on