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XxsarahxX
Mar 25th, 2008, 03:49 AM
i was having a discussion the other day with a friend who is considering be coming vegan.
but in this discussion she was aying that if a friend who didnt know she was vegan brought her a gift of cupcakes or food that had animal products she to be nice and not hurt there feelings she would eat them.
and if was at someones place who had prepared a nice meal with meat and other non vegan foods would do the same.
i would not do this to be polite even though i hadnt purchesd this food with my own money or prepared it myself i wouldnt eat it just to be nice.

what are your veiws on this would you eat animal products just to be polite to your meat and dairy eating friends and family.
would you wear second hand leather ?
as your money wouldnt be going toward the leather industry and stuff like that?

XxsarahxX
Mar 25th, 2008, 03:50 AM
im sorry for my bad spelling and grammar

Roxy
Mar 25th, 2008, 04:02 AM
Hi Sarah and welcome to the forum. I guess a lot of us here have discussed this topic many times before....and really I guess it comes down to personal opinion.

However, in saying that....the Vegan Society's definition of "vegan" is:


"Veganism denotes a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude as far as is possible and practical all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of humans, animals and the environment.

In dietary terms it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals."

Vegans certainly don't consume any animal products at all. So as a vegan that's where I draw the line when it comes to my diet. I don't cosume animal products.

I do have some leather products and some non-vegan make up items from my pre-vegan days. I am going to use these things until they are worn out or used up, and replace them with vegan equivalents. So that's where I draw the line when it comes to other things. I will no longer spend my money on non-vegan items for clothing, furnishings etc. or personal care items.

The arguments go a lot deeper than this, I know. But this is where I stand on the basics. :)

XxsarahxX
Mar 25th, 2008, 04:12 AM
i agree with using up products you have from the nin vegan days as it would be wasteful and evne worse for the environment to just throw it all away.
i do own leather shoes but i hardly wear shoes and when i do its thongs or little slip on things.
but i woulndt eat animal products ever again.

i understand everyone has different limits to what the can and cant do.
i just wanted to see if anyone else would eat to be nice if that makes sense

Mahk
Mar 25th, 2008, 06:07 AM
im sorry for my bad spelling and grammar

Welcome.

Click the "ABC" with a check mark under it in the top right of where you compose messages for the forum's built-in spell checker. As for grammar, I can't help you there. I not good word combining also.;)

As your friends get to know that you are a vegan they will hopefully stop bringing food gifts unless they are certain that they are vegan. I once received leather gloves as a gift and gave them away to my father.

I think most vegans agree that throwing away all your non-vegan goods is a waste and fills the garbage land fills too quickly. I wore out/ used up my non-vegan stuff (toothpaste etc.) just like Roxy described but then only bought vegan goods from then on. We each have to draw our own lines in the sand, I guess.

XxsarahxX
Mar 25th, 2008, 06:17 AM
well there you go i didnt even notice the abc thing thank you.
everyone on this forum is so helpful.

:)

sunrisesunset
Mar 25th, 2008, 08:34 AM
i would not eat any non-vegan food, whether it was bought for me as a gift or made for a meal. i try to let everyone know my moral basis on eating such foods, so i would hope they wouldnt expect me to eat them or be offended that i dont. throwing out non-vegan food is just as terrible as eating it, so try to give it to a non-vegan. the second hand leather thing tends to be a tricky topic amongst vegans and it varies. personally i think if you wear leather period, you are still supporting it. you are still out there showcasing that it is okay. just my personal opinion.

harpy
Mar 25th, 2008, 10:42 AM
Hello Sarah. I wouldn't eat non-vegan presents myself, but it would be a shame if this one point put your friend off making a move to being (mostly) vegan. If she feels able to follow a vegan lifestyle apart from that one thing I would give her every encouragement.

Marrers
Mar 25th, 2008, 02:14 PM
Following on from what harpy says I think your friend may need to think of things that way at the moment in order to make going vegan seem do-able for her, and that she won't be making life difficult for others. I reckon she would find herself moving away from being able to eat those things after she was vegan for a while though. (I've read on here that quite a few of us, me included, who kept leather shoes to 'wear out' found we actually did not feel comfortable wearing them the longer we were vegan.)

My slight concern would be the message she is giving people who hear her say she is vegan but then see her eating non-vegan things - this can impact on all of us as they will then assume all vegans are not strict and will eat non-vegan food or they will misunderstand what vegan means.

Two weeks after I stopped eating fish my cousin made me a prawn curry (she had made an effort to cook what she thought was a 'vegetarian' dish, having met many people who claimed to be vegetarians but who ate fish - this was almost 20 years ago). I did eat it to be polite but I didn't enjoy it. I decided then that I would not eat things which upset me just to avoid upsetting others.
I certainly would not knowingly eat anything non-vegan now.

Fungus
Mar 25th, 2008, 03:09 PM
For me, when I'm staying with other people at least, I'd draw the line where I know something isnt vegan I wouldnt eat it ..
e.g - I'd eat pasta that had been cooked with storebought tomato sauce that might have lactic acid that might have come from milk.
- I wouldn't eat egg pasta.

Or ..
I'll eat chips (fries in US) from a chippie that might have fried them alongside fish etc ..
But I wont eat chips that have been cooked in lard.

Basically when I'm with other people I wont look at the ingredients when theres a high likelihood of it being vegan ;-)
JHMO_YMMV ..

AnneCE
Mar 25th, 2008, 03:43 PM
I thought like this when I first went vegan, that I would eat non-vegan food if given to me by a non-vegan. However, once I was vegan for about a month or so, I decided that I wouldn't knowingly eat non-vegan food. However, if someone has made an effort to make a vegan meal and there is a slight chance it may not be vegan e.g. the example Fungus gave of pasta sauce where the animal product is quite low down the list. I would also try to use the situation to explain veganism. However, I don't often get cooked food by other people (sob!), so the problem hasn't arisen.

With your friend, it might be something which helps her transition as Marrers says. It certainly was for me.

MinkeyMonkey
Mar 26th, 2008, 03:40 AM
I think it is a great question. I was a vegetarian most of my life but always ate whatever gramma cooked. My gram knew we were all veg but she thought using turkey sausage instead of pork sausage was the same as being veg. "Oh, but its chicken" she would say. We tried, my whole family tried, but she just didn't get it. When I got older, I think around high school, I started calling myself a "propertarian" which, as far as I was concerned, meant that I ate what I felt was right. And, for me, sometimes what was right was what gramma cooked. I also gave her allowances because she was a depression era baby so every scrap of anything edible was like solid gold to her.

I'm brand new to this board so I hope I don't step on any toes. I just don't know about labels. If someone adheres to the vegan policy, they are vegan. If someone wants to be vegan but leaves room for allowances, well I think that is their prerogative. Frankly, I still don't call myself vegetarian or vegan, just a gal who doesn't eat or wear meats. Ew, or all that other stuff.

I feed my dogs whatever works for them and that includes their health, their tastes (very picky dogs!) and their skin as we live in a dry region high up at about 8300 feet. They get salmon with veggies and fruit and they are happy and the vet is happy with their health.

For me, I don't want to eat anything that I consider against my principles. but, in those rare cases, if gramma was still alive, I'd eat whatever the heck she made for me.

One thing I did when I got rid of the cheese was to not consider vegan cheese as a replacement for dairy cheese. If I look at it as "supposed to taste like cheese" then I don't like it. when I think of it as "its own thing" then somehow I like it so much more! That may or may not help your friend. Oh, and not worrying about labeling herself vegan might help too. Maybe just going towards veganism is enough for her?

littlewinker
Mar 26th, 2008, 05:20 PM
I only eat vegan food.

If omeone gave me fur or leather I would not wear it. It IS contributing because they brought it for YOU. And even if they didn't, the more people see fur/leather out and about the more is normalizes it for them and makes it acceptable

heat13
Apr 9th, 2008, 08:45 AM
Hi Sarah and welcome to the forum. I guess a lot of us here have discussed this topic many times before....and really I guess it comes down to personal opinion.

However, in saying that....the Vegan Society's definition of "vegan" is:



Vegans certainly don't consume any animal products at all. So as a vegan that's where I draw the line when it comes to my diet. I don't cosume animal products.

I do have some leather products and some non-vegan make up items from my pre-vegan days. I am going to use these things until they are worn out or used up, and replace them with vegan equivalents. So that's where I draw the line when it comes to other things. I will no longer spend my money on non-vegan items for clothing, furnishings etc. or personal care items.

The arguments go a lot deeper than this, I know. But this is where I stand on the basics. :)


Roxy, my feelings exactly! I was worried about what to do with my cosmetics and such that are not vegan (Obviously I had them before I became vegan). I hate hate hate wasting things, so I was def wondering what to do! Now I feel more comfortable using my nonvegan things up. Thanks!

Kitteh
Apr 14th, 2008, 02:50 AM
I agree w/ Roxy's post. If ppl, like my Grandma or others who know I am vegan, offer me something that's non-vegan I just decline, I won't always point out again that I'm vegan, I'll just say "no thanks, I don't want it". If it's someone I know won't be offended I will remind them that it's not vegan, I won't compromise just to not hurt someone's feelings, they'll get over it, it's not the end of the world.

Roxy
Apr 14th, 2008, 03:00 AM
My leather wallet finally wore out last year, after I'd had it for 7 years. I replaced it with a nice cloth wallet, which is cruelty free and actually looks a lot nicer.

Next to go will be my leather watch band that I've had for 8 years or so. It's falling apart.

XxsarahxX
Apr 14th, 2008, 03:07 AM
wow your wallet does sound nice.
matts wallet is falling apart to so he will be getting a cruelty free one soon hopefully..


i dont plan on wearing the leather shoes i have the only reason i still have them hidden in my closet is because im not sure wether any one in my family would want them and if they dont ill give them to the salvos

Kitteh
Apr 14th, 2008, 03:37 AM
I gave shoes to my best mate and a belt as well. I gave my Mum some perfumes I had for ages. I have a gorgeous scarf/wrap I was given by someone, it's probably a wool blend, it's so soft and a beautiful colour. I can't bring myself to throw it away or give it away because of the sentimental value, but I won't wear it, lol.

I'm still wearing a pair of Asics sneakers I've had since before I was vegan. I need shoes that I can fit my orthotics in, so I'm not sure where I will buy new sneakers when I need to.

XxsarahxX
Apr 14th, 2008, 03:41 AM
oh the scarf does sound nice sentimental stuff i dont think i could get rid of but i would wear it either.

yeah shoes would be hard to find if you need a special kind. i find my problem with shoes is i can hardly find my size any more most places have stoppted supplying size 5 it sucks its like they think people dont have small feet anymore :( and they were usaully cheap and no leather

Roxy
Apr 14th, 2008, 04:26 AM
I have a wool sweater too. I didn't wear it this past winter and I'm thinking that it will be donated to a charity store before too long.

heat13
Apr 14th, 2008, 07:35 AM
I think my sis and I are going to do a big donation of all our old things. But some of the main items I may need to keep until they wear (like my running shoes). What kinds of vegan shoes are there to work out in? Mine are Mizuno and I had no idea until recently there were even animal products in them.

XxsarahxX
Apr 14th, 2008, 07:39 AM
I'm not to sure what shoes there are you might have to go online and look around.
i no Macbeth have a shoe suitable for vegans but i cant remember which ones but they are a skate shoe so it wouldn't be any help for you i don't think.
good luck finding some

Kitteh
Apr 14th, 2008, 10:55 AM
I read that some Asics in the U.K were vegan, not sure if it's still true.

I was thinking of ordering some online from the U.K/U.S.A.

http://www.vegetarian-shoes.co.uk/
http://www.vegetarianshoesandbags.com/
http://www.mooshoes.com/
http://www.veganshoes.com/
http://www.peta.org/living/alt1.asp

maikeru
Apr 14th, 2008, 01:38 PM
Also for your list:

http://www.veganline.com/
http://www.ethicalwares.com/

Michael.

Kitteh
Apr 15th, 2008, 02:36 AM
I knew there was some I'd missed ;) ta