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veggiemaya
Jul 30th, 2008, 04:31 PM
ok..so i have been trying to figure out what i can have in the morning that will be high in protein, but low in fat and sugar, easy to eat at work, and of course..vegan. i want to try to lose some weight..and i think one of my problems is not eating enough early in the day to get my metabolism going.

can anyone give me any suggestions? thanks!!

gogs67
Jul 30th, 2008, 04:56 PM
ok..so i have been trying to figure out what i can have in the morning that will be high in protein, but low in fat and sugar, easy to eat at work, and of course..vegan. i want to try to lose some weight..and i think one of my problems is not eating enough early in the day to get my metabolism going.

can anyone give me any suggestions? thanks!!
Protein powder in a fruit drink (fresh orange/pineapple/strawberry etc) will fill you till mid day at least!

xrodolfox
Jul 30th, 2008, 08:24 PM
Seitan?

DancingWillow
Jul 30th, 2008, 08:49 PM
oatmeal...it's high in protein and in fiber.

peanut butter and nuts (especially almonds)

soy products (milk, yogurt) have a good amount of protein also. or you can make tofu scramble.

whole grain cereal and bread have protein as well.

Stu
Jul 30th, 2008, 10:21 PM
oatmeal...it's high in protein and in fiber.

peanut butter and nuts (especially almonds)

soy products (milk, yogurt) have a good amount of protein also. or you can make tofu scramble.

whole grain cereal and bread have protein as well.

Well definitely not nuts - they're very high in fat.

veganeatingout
Jul 30th, 2008, 10:50 PM
Not sure if this qualifies as being easy to eat at work but Hormel Vegetarian Chili with beans is high in protein and low in fat.

Ruby Rose
Jul 30th, 2008, 10:58 PM
porridge made with soya milk - if you have a microwave at work

Fuhzy
Jul 31st, 2008, 12:21 AM
1c oatmeal + 1c soymilk

veggiemaya
Jul 31st, 2008, 06:32 AM
well, it does look like oatmeal is the general concensus. maybe i can add some hemp protein for a little extra boost.
i wish it was easier to find really tasty soy yogurt that doesnt have any dairy at all in it.

Pilaf
Jul 31st, 2008, 07:41 AM
Seitan?

Hail Seitan. *crosses two metal horn firsts*

Gorilla
Jul 31st, 2008, 01:53 PM
i wish it was easier to find really tasty soy yogurt that doesnt have any dairy at all in it.

that's a shame you can't find vegan soya yogurt. there's a good range available in the UK.

veggiemaya
Jul 31st, 2008, 05:23 PM
that's a shame you can't find vegan soya yogurt. there's a good range available in the UK.

yes, it is a shame. there is one brand that is pretty good, but its almost impossible to come by. and if i stock up, some of it winds up going past the exp. date before i get a chance to eat it. and of course they have O'Soy yogurt brand all over the place...which is probably very tasty..but the active cultures in it are milk based. so frustrating!

gogs67
Jul 31st, 2008, 06:03 PM
yes, it is a shame. there is one brand that is pretty good, but its almost impossible to come by. and if i stock up, some of it winds up going past the exp. date before i get a chance to eat it. and of course they have O'Soy yogurt brand all over the place...which is probably very tasty..but the active cultures in it are milk based. so frustrating!

Dunno bout the brand you buy but the Alpro soya yoghurt we get here keeps for a lot longer than the sell by date. I've had some that was months out of date, opened it and it was fine!:thumbsup:

Gorilla
Jul 31st, 2008, 06:04 PM
lucky you gogs - i've had Alpro yogurt go very bad past its use-by date :p

Tigerlily
Jul 31st, 2008, 06:47 PM
For something super simple and easy to eat, try protein bars. There are several brands that are vegan such as Cliff, Luna Bar, Vega...

xrodolfox
Jul 31st, 2008, 08:14 PM
well, it does look like oatmeal is the general concensus. maybe i can add some hemp protein for a little extra boost.
i wish it was easier to find really tasty soy yogurt that doesnt have any dairy at all in it.

100% vegan soy yogurt is quite easy to find in the US.

Just look for "Silk" brand soy yogurt. there's several other brands as well, but none so proliferous. I get mine at Meijers, but they sell it at Stop & SHop, Whole Foods, Price Chopper, Krogers, etc.

Jippia
Aug 5th, 2008, 09:50 AM
For me, wholegrain cereals with soy milk works well. A big bowl of it. With some orange juuice or iron-fortified lemonade syrup. For lunch, beans are a good source of protein and are low-fat. Mixed with some bulb pepper pieces and sweetcorn they make a nice salad. Tahini and Marmite sandwiches are also great lunch or breakfast items, but that may be too high in fat for you. I do not know how much time you have got in the morning. There are more grains than oatmeal to make porridge from, like millet and buckwheat. You can use low-fat soy milk to get the proteins without too much fat, I think.

Cristoforopal
Dec 15th, 2012, 06:27 AM
For simplicity oats are the king of low fat and decent protein. I've been eating them with water and a nuker in 3 mins flat every day for a year =).

I've recently added in rolled barley to the oats. They are close in composition with barley containing less fat and equal protein/carbs. One added benefit of barley and oats is that barley has much tastier flavor too.

I guess if u rly rly want some more protein's with less carbs you could eat legumes breakfast time =(.

VeganBoy
Feb 26th, 2013, 09:20 PM
Hi everyone, I'm new here and thought I'd wade straight in with some info!

I do quite a bit of weight training so have a high protein diet and my typical breakfast is:

- 100g oats
- handful of berries (usually blueberries)
- big scoop of vegan protein powder
- water and/or rice milk
- dash of hemp oil

It's high in calories thanks to the hemp oil, so leave that out if you don't need the extra cals, but it tastes great, fills you up 'til lunch and is really high in protein.

I get cheap protein powder from here as it allows you to search for the cheapest according to price per kg http://proteinfinder.co.uk/products/cheapest-vegan-protein-supplements/

Hope that helps!

Cristoforopal
Feb 27th, 2013, 06:32 PM
Sorry guys. I hate to say it but avoid eating protein powders when u can. If u are at home.... u can make the time 2 eat right. there are 4g protein per 100g oats. Its 12g protein 360 cals per 330g serving. natural peanutbutter; 90 cals/tablepoon/4g protein. Milk 8.5g Protein per cup. Wheat. etc.... Stop eating that whey shit and eat real food.

Blueberries
Feb 27th, 2013, 07:13 PM
Stop eating that whey shit and eat real food.

Vegan protein powders can be made of soya, hemp or pea protein. All food is real, whether you think it's good or bad for you is a different issue but unless it only exists in our imagination it is real.

VeganBoy
Feb 28th, 2013, 11:23 AM
Sorry guys. I hate to say it but avoid eating protein powders when u can. If u are at home.... u can make the time 2 eat right. there are 4g protein per 100g oats. Its 12g protein 360 cals per 330g serving. natural peanutbutter; 90 cals/tablepoon/4g protein. Milk 8.5g Protein per cup. Wheat. etc.... Stop eating that whey shit and eat real food.

Whey is not vegan, it's a dairy product, so that couldn't be used, but I see your point.

Whole foods are always ideal but if you were, for example, a vegan bodybuilder, requiring 3g protein per lb bodyweight per day, I think it would be very difficult to achieve with whole foods alone without getting through a massive amount of food and therefore consuming excess calories and gaining fat. It would be necessary to 'supplement' your dietary intake with a protein supplement e.g. soy/pea/rice protein, which is food, it's just not whole food (i.e. it is processed) but not necessarily bad for you.

Not all processed food is bad, I like bread but you wouldn't catch me eating a bag of flour - a process like that is just fine by me!

Robinwomb
Feb 28th, 2013, 12:22 PM
I agree with Blueberries and Veganboy, all food is "real". Whole foods can also mean a lot of things. Oats aren't necessarily a "whole food" that is totally unprocessed either unless you eat the whole oat groat but it still needs to be cooked to be digestible.

I also get tired of all the knit picking that goes on in vegan circles as far as what is healthy and what isnt. It distracts from what is really important about our movement and turns off nonvegans from even trying. It seems everything from soy to grains to cooked food to protein powders to starchy vegetables to beans is bad for you. I even saw a comment once that too many leafy raw green vegetables are "bad" due to high oxylates. Good grief. Sighs...

BTW, as someone who is and has been in the past very very underweight, pea protein has been a tremendous help in getting nutrition in that I would otherwise not be able to . It has its place.

Cristoforopal
Mar 4th, 2013, 06:22 PM
I don't think protein powders are bad. I know so. Whatever it's derived from; dairy, plant powders, the extraction method for the protein isolate usually toxic. I have heavily researched this and go look... "supplements", as per FDA regulation do not require testing. As such the companies can do whatever the hell they like and sell it to you. Most commonly they protein powder manufacturing comes from bombarding the bean/milk with acid or some other solvent. The purification process then further pollutes the protein in order to reduce toxicity of the protein. Once you digest this protein you will have toxic food + crap dead busted amino acid junk proteins.

At best case people, the high end milk proteins I have read of do not use solvents to extract, and the toxicity is negligible. It's essentially powdered milk which is a safe and decent alternative. However, the dried protein is still not in a natural state and should be used secondarily to FRESH food because the protein quality is reduced.. a lot. Why not just buy powdered soy, or some soy milk? It's far superior quality and almost 100% safe.

I also want to add that I can back up my claims by wearing the evidence which co-responds with my all natural vegan diet. When I say wearing I mean to say. I am a vegan bodybuilder of nine-months, consistently adding muscle over that period with no powder. My muscle building protein ratio has been 2.0 to 2.5 grams of protein per kilo of bodyweight. My maintenance protein needs around 60. I did a three week bulk and I added around 1.5 lbs muscle.

But don't take my word for it, do some more research on the powders your self. This day and age we've been sold on the powders, among other things. It's wise to become an Informed consumer and develop your own understanding of a product. Believe me, I am an "anti-powderist =)" with good intentions for you.

VeganBoy
Mar 5th, 2013, 12:47 PM
Interesting.

I haven't heard any cases (and I mean not even one) of people becoming ill or suffering any side effect from using protein powders though, and millions of people consume multiple doses every single day.

Are you sure it's that bad? Are there not toxins in most of our processed foods? Just eating a loaf of bread or tin of tomatoes means we're consuming preservatives and substances we wouldn't eat if we made the product ourselves.

I'm not disputing the point you make, I'm just questioning whether it is really detrimental to health. What do you think?