PDA

View Full Version : Anyone have geothermal heating?



Tamara
Aug 27th, 2008, 02:57 AM
I am considering installing a geothermal heating/cooling system. I would like any information you care to share. Tamara

ellaminnowpea
Aug 27th, 2008, 03:34 AM
I just took an environmental engineering class on this type of thing. One of our lessons was on geothermal heating. It's basically the most efficient system out there and has the least impact on the environment. What do you want to know?

Mr Flibble
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:29 AM
I seem to remember vbb talking about getting this a while back. Alas my garden isn't quite big enough ;)

gogs67
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:53 AM
I am considering installing a geothermal heating/cooling system. I would like any information you care to share. Tamara
The installation and drilling costs are rather prohibitive here although there are government grants to help cover some of that.
It's def the way ahead though for any new build homes! (or should be anyway :rolleyes:)

Tamara
Aug 27th, 2008, 02:48 PM
The heating contractor is calling the system a ground source heat pump. The cost is between ten and twelve thousand dollars. What I need to know is what percent of energy savings I can expect so that I can figure out my budget. Tamara

Hemlock
Aug 27th, 2008, 05:43 PM
We thought about it but not only did we not want to dig the garden up but it is horribly expensive in this country, most people have a limited budget so we went for woodburning central heating and solar for hot water in summer as we live next to a forest so plenty of free wood!

Sounds like a great idea though - hope you go for it!

ellaminnowpea
Aug 27th, 2008, 07:30 PM
I'll ask my professor if he can send his published textbook on the subject to me so I can forward it to you.

GHP systems use 25-50% less electricity than conventional systems. In addition, you can save between 44-72% of the energy consumption when compared to heat pumps or electric resistence heating. Maintence costs are really low and the systems last more than 20 years. The lifecycle cost (cost of installation/ materials + energy costs over time + maintenance costs) is very, very low. It's the best investment you can make both monetarily and environmentally.

Tamara
Aug 27th, 2008, 08:15 PM
Thanks for all the input. I am really excited about the project. When I came to the ranch in 2001, it was the most environmentally unfriendly place on the planet. In addition to the geothermal heat pump I am searching for a solar contractor and for the cherry on top I think a wind generator would be fabulous. There are few days without wind. I would like my property to become an example to the locals of what one person can accomplish when they care. The learn curve is extreme. I truly appreciate any help you care to offer. The area where I live is RED NECK to its core. The whole county is getting ready for the Pendleton Round-Up. I don’t venture into town until the nightmare passes. I can’t stand to see how they treat the animals. Tamara

veganbikerboy
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:18 PM
I seem to remember vbb talking about getting this a while back. Alas my garden isn't quite big enough ;)


I have been thinking about it. I think geothermal are the deep boreholes (100m) that you send water down and get steam back up. The other system (i forget the name) where you basically bury black pipe about 1m below the surface ao the water that enters your house (to be heated) arrives warmer therefore doesnt need as much energy to heat it. I Havent got the money yet to do it, but with the position of my house this is more viable than solar power.

Just as a note and just a whisper at the moment;), I am looking at buying a rig and starting a geothermal installation company, its not a million miles off what i do now, its probably 12-18mths away yet, so at the very early stages at the moment. The idea is that when we do energy consulatncy we recommend geothermal - hey presto, i know a compnay that does it:D

Tamara
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:39 PM
One of the things that concern me about installing a ground source heat pump is establishing what price is fare. There are no ground source heat pumps installed locally and I have had to request that my heating contractor do a special order for me. The local opinion is that individuals that care about the environment are a bunch of half-witted tree huggers that will. Advise is appreciated. Tamara

Tamara
Aug 27th, 2008, 09:49 PM
Just as a note and just a whisper at the moment;), I am looking at buying a rig and starting a geothermal installation company, its not a million miles off what i do now, its probably 12-18mths away yet, so at the very early stages at the moment. The idea is that when we do energy consulatncy we recommend geothermal - hey presto, i know a compnay that does it:D[/quote]

This sounds like a smart idea. If I survive taking the ranch green, maybe I should think about sponsoring a startup company in the area. We are only four hours out of Portland, Oregon so you would think that intelligent life would contact us soon. Tamara

gogs67
Aug 27th, 2008, 10:41 PM
I have been thinking about it. I think geothermal are the deep boreholes (100m) that you send water down and get steam back up. The other system (i forget the name) where you basically bury black pipe about 1m below the surface ao the water that enters your house (to be heated) arrives warmer therefore doesnt need as much energy to heat it. I Havent got the money yet to do it, but with the position of my house this is more viable than solar power.

Just as a note and just a whisper at the moment;), I am looking at buying a rig and starting a geothermal installation company, its not a million miles off what i do now, its probably 12-18mths away yet, so at the very early stages at the moment. The idea is that when we do energy consulatncy we recommend geothermal - hey presto, i know a compnay that does it:D
Geothermal is just the term to use any of the earths heat to increase the temp of water. You only get steam back out in areas of volcanic activity (Iceland, Italy etc), the rest of the time its a 40 m circulation pipe to get the water to about 16 degrees so a lot less energy is needed to heat it for domestic use.
It's funny you saying that because it's something i've been looking into for the last few weeks as a drastic career change but i'm not sure how much of a background in geology and surveying is needed, how much training i'd need. Was thinking of going to the States and working over there for a while to gain experience then come back, as the industry is a few years ahead of ours!

veganbikerboy
Aug 27th, 2008, 11:43 PM
ok, my comments were a little flippant:p but you can tell how little research i've done to date.

I genuinely thought the holes needed to be deeper than that? i know that the rigs we currently use can't do geothermal installations? I'm not sure why, they will easily do 50m possibly more. Maybe the depth required depends on the geology? maybe you do get steam at 100m;):D

Anyway, all ideas at the moment. Ideally I would like a versatile rig that i could use for other things, but I really think this is the one thing that almost anyone with a garden can do to save energy; apparantly the financial return is far quicker than things like condensing boilers or double glazing, so it could really take off. Installation costs currently 4-6k i think.