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Aristarchus
May 31st, 2004, 06:32 PM
Camping, hiking, picnic basket time is coming fast.

Got some new ideas?

Cloudy
May 31st, 2004, 10:16 PM
Just got back from a similar jaunt myself, for breakfast I took little individual packs of ready brek, or whatever it is called where you live - the oat cereal.. Just add water and heat 'er up!

Stock cubes are light and versatile - you can add them to soups, stews or casseroles, whatever produce you pick up on the way - or just drink them as a hot drink..

I just need a lighter tent ;)

Aristarchus
Jun 1st, 2004, 01:52 AM
I just need a lighter tent

What kind of tent do you have now? I have not been able to hike for the last three years because of an injury to my sternum. Actually I can hike, I just cannot carry anything on my back or sleep on the ground. I have a Sierra tent that has been everywhere with me.



Once I accepted that I couldnít camp by backpacking we started looking into different ways to get away without being forced to stay at huge, dirty, loud campgrounds. We bought a four-inch thick (yep, thatís 4") queen size thurma rest for the back of the truck. My husband put a shelf across the bed of the truck for all our goodies. He made a plug in for charging the battery of my laptop (something to do on rainy days) and got fun things like big fluffy sleeping bags that no one cares what they weigh. We have discovered a number of places to camp that give us an isolated experience without our being harsh on the land. Since we spent so many years hiking a fire is not part of the experience for us, even when we do stay in the occasional car camp.



For the times when we will be staying at on site for more then one night he bought a tent from Cabalas that connects by a sleeve to the back of the truck. You have no idea how luxurious it makes me feel to be able to change clothes standing up or to get away from bugs while sitting on the tailgate or in a camp chair in the tent when I want to get away from bugs. I didn't even know that this was something I wanted when I was living from my hiking tent!



We are still trying to build our collection of vegan, low-impact camping food. Most of what we have learned came from our experience over a one-burner blowtorch type stove. It is just amazing to have access to an ice chest, a two-burner stove that will actually simmer (ok, someone gave me a Coleman hiking stove that will simmer, but it was heaver then my MSR) and food that must be opened with a can opener! I would not trade the trekking experience and would go back to it next weekend if I could ...at least I think that I would go back

Cloudy
Jun 1st, 2004, 11:51 AM
What kind of tent do you have now? I have not been able to hike for the last three years because of an injury to my sternum. Actually I can hike, I just cannot carry anything on my back or sleep on the ground. I have a Sierra tent that has been everywhere with me.



I have a Robens tent at the moment, which is a little big (and heavy) for hiking. Seen a nice North Face one which only weighs 1.5kg so might buy that when I next go.

I also have a little Trangia meths-burner stove which is quite light, all in. Usually buy local produce along the way then make soups or stews or something with dried stuff I take like rice, pasta, lentils, tvp, etc.

amritab@yahoo.com
Jun 1st, 2004, 06:51 PM
I tried aseptic containers of soy milk. I also got the fantastic foods soup bowls for meals, that is if you have access to hot water.

Cloudy
Jun 1st, 2004, 09:00 PM
I tried aseptic containers of soy milk. I also got the fantastic foods soup bowls for meals, that is if you have access to hot water.

Sorry I'm being a bit thick here, but what's 'aseptic'? Soya milk was a thing I missed when I was camping - gotta have the morning tea. I made up for it by adding rum ;)

Aristarchus
Jun 2nd, 2004, 01:49 AM
...what's 'aseptic'? Soya milk was a thing I missed when I was camping - gotta have the morning tea. I made up for it by adding rum



If your have Soya milk then you probably live across the pond. In the states *soy* milk (same product as Soya but with a less poetic name) come in shelf stable containers that do not need refrigeration until they have been opened. They are call aseptic cartons.



I've gotta have my morning cuppa joe. Whats rum?

Dragonethereal
Jun 2nd, 2004, 08:24 AM
I'm loving this whole thread. Being a "city slicker" most my life a big part of my vegan lifestyle change has been to get more in tune with nature. I have a mediatation room in my home and have been trying to hike and get out more often. I've always liked camping and you all seem very knowledgeable with it. I'm taking notes and feeling pretty excited about camping a lot this summer.

Cloudy
Jun 2nd, 2004, 11:08 AM
If your have Soya milk then you probably live across the pond. In the states *soy* milk (same product as Soya but with a less poetic name) come in shelf stable containers that do not need refrigeration until they have been opened. They are call aseptic cartons.



I've gotta have my morning cuppa joe. Whats rum?

Ah yes, ours are like that. The problem is the smallest I've found is 0.5l packages which is a bit of a pain once it's opened. I suppose I could open the milk then pour it into another airtight container, that'd last a few days.

Rum is an alcoholic beverage ;) If it's good enough for sailors, it's good enough for me*

Next trip I'm definitely travelling lighter, dried staple foods are the way to go!


*This does not extend to all behaviour adopted by sailors

harpy
Jun 2nd, 2004, 11:19 AM
I couldn't possibly go camping as I'm too fond of my home comforts (blush) but I noticed a couple of foods in the health food shop that looked as if they would be handy for campers:

1) powdered soy/soya milk
2) dried tofu (Japanese - made by Clearspring and comes in a tiny flat packet like astronaut's food) - I actually bought a packet of this but haven't used it yet

cedarblue
Jun 2nd, 2004, 09:44 PM
anyone seen "carry on camping"? - hehehe

webster
Jun 3rd, 2004, 08:33 PM
Methinks the reference will be lost on Americans (well, most at least) - I was not at all familiar with the 'Carry On' films until I moved to the UK. (That, and so many other things ...)

Cloudy
Jun 4th, 2004, 01:05 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/100000/images/_104760_james.jpg

webster
Jun 5th, 2004, 04:54 PM
Whenever I am travelling I tend to live on bagels. One packet will keep for a few days (if they last that long ;-) ). I find them filling enough to survive on, and don't want for much else.

The last time I went travelling though my 15 month old decided she loved bagels too - So my bagels didn't last me even half as long :-) (laughing) Perfect texture for teething babies (well, this teething baby at least).

Aristarchus
Jun 7th, 2004, 11:48 PM
Oh, poor webster!

All right. This is how we travel these days. We carry an ice chest, a camp kitchen that holds our stove, pots, plates & cups, kitchen basics and cooking basics such as oil, spices, herbs, tins of tea and coffee. We also have a small oven that works on our stove. These are amazing luxuries after years of backpacking.

A first day meal would be breakfast at home, coffee on the road; lunch would be either pre-made sandwiches with fruit or a bean burrito that we bought on the road.

For dinner in camp the first night we like to keep it simple. Fantastic makes a Sloppy Joe Mix that we like much better then veggie burgers. I will have put the mix with directions in a large ziploc bag with the tomato paste (when hiking I would have repackaged the mix for 2 servings with home made tomato leather). I would have put sliced sweet onions in a smaller ziploc and two hamburger rolls into the large ziploc.... all of which would have been labeled *Dinner #1* with the date and what I might have packed to have with it such a watermelon wedges (precut and placed in a container) and tortilla chips.

The leftovers would be put into a bag (there will be a suitable bag such as the one that held the sweet onions) for the spaghetti I have planned for another meal.

Snacks at night, if we feel like one, would come from the bag of cookies that I made before I left home.

Aristarchus
Jun 9th, 2004, 07:28 PM
Because of an up coming vacation I have been thinking about this a good deal lately. Here is another day of Road Food.

Breakfast:Seasonal fruit that we have picked up at a stand along the way. (Cherries and Strawberries in June, Blackberries and Plums in July, always bananas and melon wedges). Oatmeal is always easy but if there are oatmeal cookies I will be happier.
--We like to get up at first light to go birding, we do not generally eat anything before we head out into the dark, the sunrise and all the life that comes with it would be distracted by hot drinks or preparations. When we come back to camp we want easy to eat and something as alive as our surroundings while we listen to the stove hiss and the coffee perk.)
lunch: Usually something pre-made and stowable either in a soft sided insulated lunch container to carry in a day pack (I still do that) or in the hatch of the kayak. *Sandwich-Whole grain bread spread with tofutti and chopped toasted hazelnuts, peeled, sliced kiwi fruit and watercress (thank you Vert!). *A piece of dark vegan chocolate. Plum or apricot and possibly a container of soy yogurt. Bottle of water or fruit drink.

Dinner: In Camp. Mongolian Grill--Sort of a stir-fry with noodles. Either bring a bag of pre boiled pasta (undon-raman style, or spaghetti type) or cook a handful of pasta in camp. Vegetables can be pre cut and bagged or cut in camp. I keep a high quality 8" chef knife and a small cutting board in my camp kitchen. Vegetables are typical stir-fry choices with an emphasis on seasonal choices, such as... Peppers, Cauliflower, Fennel Bulbs, Celery, Snow or Snap peas, Asparagus, Corn cut from the cob (adds a wonderful texture and sweetness), sliced Carrots. I also add fresh chopped herbs when they are easy and cheep to get and a handful of sliced greens--Chard is my favorite but good ol' spinach is easy to get, throw them in at the end just to brighten them up. Cubed Tofu is also good with the right oil and seasonings. The Process: In a wok or large hiking style pot--stir-fry the tofu in the hot oiled pot. Set aside (in the lid of the hiking pot) when the edges begin to brown. Add three or more vegetable choices to the hot wok/pot, shake them around a bit to heat them (they absorb less oil this way) then add 1 to 3 tablespoons of oil such as grapeseed or peanut oil (high smoking temp, good flavor) to the veggies. Stir-fry 3 to 5 minutes, add any seasoning you enjoy (we like on called Pacific Northwest Blend which includes crushed red pepper, ginger, anise, garlic & dill. We also like a local Herbs de Provonce with lavender blossoms) and heat until the herbs are fragrant. Add the tofu and cooked noodles. When hot, add the sliced greens and fresh herbs if using any. Plate up and serve with toasted almonds or sesame seeds, sesame oil (I never use it to cook with, only as a condiment) and Braggs or soy sauce. It is a meal in itself when plated up.
Snacks:Tortilla chips with salsa and humus.

cedarblue
Jun 9th, 2004, 07:37 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/olmedia/100000/images/_104760_james.jpg






hehehe
daughter is fanatical about the carry on films and i figure that there are a lot worse things she could be watching apart from a bit of innocent boob and bot innuendo! ;)
(her favourites ar carry on abroad and carry on cruising)

phillip888
Jun 11th, 2004, 11:28 PM
I just pack a backpack full or fruit and raw veggies. The only things I avoid is leafies since they go bad quickly if it's warm out. No preperation or special supplies but a butter knife. I also bring water if it's really warm.

Mystic
Jun 14th, 2004, 01:50 AM
I am in Australia, but I know that in America you can buy Tastybite curries, which are ready-to-eat meals that don't require refrigeration and you can heat up by putting the sachet in boiling water (or microwave it) which would be perfect for camping. I have tried the punjab eggplant and the bombay potatoes (which is like a chickpea and potato curry) and they are just delicious. Serve it on top of rice (if you can boil rice) or with pita or flat bread and you have a delish, nutrish meal. The eggplant and bombay potatoes are both vegan and I think a couple of the other varieties are vegan too. Others are all just vegetarian (contain cream or butter). The website is www.tastybite.com (http://www.tastybite.com) if you can't find it in the shops.

Cloudy
Jun 14th, 2004, 07:11 PM
(her favourites ar carry on abroad and carry on cruising)

Gotta agree with your daughter there, "Carry on abroad" is a belter! I have that one on DVD!

Actually might watch it tonight, haven't seen it for ages and there's nothing on except football (yawn)

ambulanceblues
Jun 17th, 2004, 03:31 AM
My husband and I are transitioning to "Ultra Lite" backpacking. We just bought an MSR "Missing Link" tent that has no poles (You use your trekking poles) and only weighs a couple of pounds. It was expensive (Almost $200 American, and that was on sale!) but we will use it a lot (hopefully!).

A food dehydrator is also a good investment (usually not too expensive $30 - $50 American). You can dry fruits, vegetables, soup, make tofu jerky - really any vegan food can be made into camping food that's lightweight and keeps preserved without refrigeration. Silk brand makes small 8 oz. containers of soy milk that I like to take (even though they're slightly heavy) for my morning coffee.

Megan

cast_the_flames
Jun 17th, 2004, 09:09 AM
hmm, tofu jerky, granola, nuts, apples, oranges, dried fruit, vegan food bars, a bag of vegan cookies *blush*, cereal, pb and jelly sandwiches.

i've made tofu jerky in the toaster oven, although it definately started to mold after a few weeks... maybe expensive machinery really is worth it. you can also buy packages of it, though.

Aristarchus
Jun 17th, 2004, 07:32 PM
A food dehydrator is also a good investment (usually not too expensive $30 - $50 American). You can dry fruits, vegetables, soup, make tofu jerky - really any vegan food can be made into camping food that's lightweight and keeps preserved without refrigeration.Making tomato leather was very helpful for making soups, beans, and pasta. Add torn chunks of tomato leather to the pasta or soup water and it comes back to sauce consistency. It can be dried with or without herbs. Quartered pears are like candy on the trail (commercial dry pears tend to have the "guts" in them still and are really way too dry). Chopped or thin sliced cabbage, sliced RIPE tomatoes, ripe peppers thin sliced, and chopped SWEET onions are very useful on trail. They go nicely into any soup, they are good in wraps (which travel better then bread) when set in a small water bottle with liquid (carry it from your belt to be ready by lunchtime (drain or drink water, toss with oil/vinegar dressing, add leftover pasta, lentil or whatever, wrap and eat), they are even good in trail stir fry (over corn pasta requires less fuel then rice) Lentil and or barley soup cooks with less fuel when set to soak in the same water bottle for dinner. Regular or even thick cut oatmeal uses less fuel if it is soaked overnight. It can be eaten cold (it will be soft enough to eat) or briefly heated. Some things that are better purchased freeze-dried are peas, carrots, and mushrooms get leathery when home dried.


Silk brand makes small 8 oz. containers of soymilk that I like to take (even though they're slightly heavy) for my morning coffee. We liked to hop out of the bag and head down the trail with minimal work. Usually we had a Luna bar and a sorta fizzy cold vitamin drink. We often stopped after about 2 hours for a bit more breakfast. Sometimes we cooked then. However the smartest thing we did for ourselves was to quite coffee and tea. We were alert and ready to go in the AM without it. We could cut down on the amount of fuel we needed to carry without needing to heat water or carry creamer. We did carry decalf coffee and tea for those mornings when we would keep a base camp by a lake or other great view but generally we enjoyed that in the evening if the bugs were not hostile.