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VeganLu
Apr 6th, 2010, 09:39 PM
To Risker:

Don't mind me. You are right. Patientia and I originally said "strict vegetarian".

All is good!

rxseeeyse
May 11th, 2010, 06:35 AM
I think to call those people "having a plant-based diet“ is appropriate, because nothing of their food is animal derived.

Sweet_pea
May 12th, 2010, 07:32 PM
In my opinion I don't care if some one says they're 99% vegan or vegetarian. Either way they are still making a difference. And a lot more than the average person. Being vegan is a challenge and if you're up to it that's awesome but it's wrong to go around on your high horse saying that being vegan is the only right way. Because every one else is making a difference too. =]

leedsveg
May 12th, 2010, 11:03 PM
In my opinion I don't care if some one says they're 99% vegan or vegetarian. Either way they are still making a difference. And a lot more than the average person. Being vegan is a challenge and if you're up to it that's awesome but it's wrong to go around on your high horse saying that being vegan is the only right way. Because every one else is making a difference too. =]

Many years ago, I went out with a Sheffield lass who became 99% virgin. Unfortunately, Sweet_pea, her daddy was not as understanding as you...

lv:)

VeganLu
May 14th, 2010, 09:56 PM
People who are not vegan should not call themselves "vegan anything". If pertaining to their diet, they should say they are "total vegetarians". Yes, I had a huge discussion over this term somewhere else on the forum, but I saw the light when I was told that "strict vegetarian" was not correct, but "total vegetarian" was, even though both terms could be considered correct.

I know that many people who do not know what being vegan is all about do not intentionally misuse the word "vegan" when they call themselves "dietary vegans". So when someone tells me they are vegan, I ask them right off if they mean their diet, or the whole vegan lifestyle. If they answer "diet", I politely explain to them what being vegan is all about, and that they should refer to themselves as "total vegetarians" and not use the term "vegan" at all.

superglue
May 14th, 2010, 10:48 PM
People who are not vegan should not call themselves "vegan anything". If pertaining to their diet, they should say they are "total vegetarians". Yes, I had a huge discussion over this term somewhere else on the forum, but I saw the light when I was told that "strict vegetarian" was not correct, but "total vegetarian" was, even though both terms could be considered correct.

I know that many people who do not know what being vegan is all about do not intentionally misuse the word "vegan" when they call themselves "dietary vegans". So when someone tells me they are vegan, I ask them right off if they mean their diet, or the whole vegan lifestyle. If they answer "diet", I politely explain to them what being vegan is all about, and that they should refer to themselves as "total vegetarians" and not use the term "vegan" at all.

Hey VeganLu,
How do people respond to your clarification? Is it off-putting? Do they get defensive? Or are they genuinely relieved to learn that they aren't vegans, but rather total vegetarians? I find that I have the tendency to get all pouty when I'm given unsolicited advice or corrected about something without asking if I was wrong. Curious to hear how people react to you?

VeganLu
May 15th, 2010, 12:20 AM
Hi superglue:

I get pretty good responses. I guess it is because I "walk on eggs" and try to be as polite as possible when I explain to them why veganism is a total lifestyle and does not just pertain to diet. I smile when I explain to them that using the word "vegan" out of context (dietary vegan) could misrepresent to others what veganism is all about. However, I quickly tell them that all the food animals are grateful to THEM because they are "total vegetarians". It usually breaks the ice, and quite often they get very interested in where I purchase my clothes that are vegan, as well as other aspects of my veganism.

leedsveg
May 15th, 2010, 11:58 AM
Hi superglue:

I get pretty good responses. I guess it is because I "walk on eggs" and try to be as polite as possible when I explain to them why veganism is a total lifestyle and does not just pertain to diet. I smile when I explain to them that using the word "vegan" out of context (dietary vegan) could misrepresent to others what veganism is all about. However, I quickly tell them that all the food animals are grateful to THEM because they are "total vegetarians". It usually breaks the ice, and quite often they get very interested in where I purchase my clothes that are vegan, as well as other aspects of my veganism.

Well done VeganLu!:thumbsup:

leedsveg

VeganLu
May 15th, 2010, 10:07 PM
Thanks Leedsveg.

Bearshark
Jul 24th, 2010, 10:34 AM
So my friend at work (a vegetarian) today told me that after hearing about me talk about how easy it was to go vegan, he was going to do it too, just for 30 days to try it out. He asked for advice about things to watch out for, and I mentioned something to do with animal testing, and he said "oh no, I'm not worried about that, I'm going to become a dietary vegan" and I swear I started to twitch!
Was a poor choice of his to tell me this, now I'm determined to (quietly and nicely) turn him into an actual vegan :p I'd never heard the term "dietary vegan" until today, and it doesn't make sense to me, I don't like it!

harpy
Jul 24th, 2010, 05:04 PM
Terminology aside, though, that's good news, isn't it, Bearshark? I suppose it can seem hard to change everything at once but then once they've successfully changed their diet people often decide to do the job properly.

Bearshark
Jul 24th, 2010, 11:08 PM
Hell yes it is!! I spent the whole day thinking of all the things I could tell him to watch out for, and telling him what restaurants were really good and things like that.
I also informed him that I was super impressed at him making that choice (I figure encouragement is always nice!) so I'm planning on just asking how it's going every now and then, and if he decides to stay vegan I will figure out a nice and non-pushy way to mention how maybe he could start avoiding other animal products.
But it is certainly good news :D

DiaShel
Jul 25th, 2010, 12:07 PM
I'd rather they call themselves strict vegetarians. Seems more appropriate.

Go get him Bearshark! Bring him over to our side.

Est
Jul 25th, 2010, 12:45 PM
Late to the thread as always!

I don't think the term 'strict vegetarian' is accurate either though - as a vegetarian:
does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish or crustacea, or slaughter by-products. - The Vegetarian Society. This is obviously a long way from a vegan diet. If I were a waiter/waitress and a customer told me they were a strict vegetarian, I would assume this meant they were strict about sticking to that (no occasional lapses and no exceptions for chicken!)

I personally don't have a problem with the term 'dietary vegan' as it does what it says on the tin: someone who follows a vegan diet but who hasn't made the surrounding ethical choices that would make them a 'vegan'. I don't think 'dietary vegan' dilutes the meaning of 'vegan'. I think it would only do that if a dietary vegan started calling themselves a vegan and dropping the word 'dietary' as that *would* start to create the impression that veganism is just about diet - but that's a different scenario from someone referring to themselves as a dietary vegan with the intention of saying they follow a vegan diet.

However, I respect that on this board the term is not acceptable and won't be using it. In fact, I've never had this issue come up in real life so won't be using it there either!

Bearshark
Jul 26th, 2010, 09:32 AM
Go get him Bearshark! Bring him over to our side.

I'm gonna give it a try! Unfortunately, someone asked him why he was trying being vegan and he said "for dietary reasons, I don't really care about the animals" which says to me that this may be harder than anticipated....

DiaShel
Jul 26th, 2010, 11:29 AM
^ Well you'll just have to make him care won't you? Beat him into submission!
:devil:

harpy
Jul 26th, 2010, 11:43 AM
I'm gonna give it a try! Unfortunately, someone asked him why he was trying being vegan and he said "for dietary reasons, I don't really care about the animals" which says to me that this may be harder than anticipated....

I shouldn't necessarily take that at face value, as people sometimes say these things if they think it will make them seem more "normal", or they say them because they haven't thought about the subject properly yet.

Anyway, eating a vegan diet for any reason has good results doesn't it? Personally I would just help him with the diet apsect for now and see how things pan out.

DiaShel
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:26 PM
^ That's a really good point. I got interested in veganism for health reasons and that very quickly changed with just a bit of information.

aubergine
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:36 PM
^ That's a really good point. I got interested in veganism for health reasons and that very quickly changed with just a bit of information.

Me too.

Bearshark
Jul 27th, 2010, 08:15 AM
That's a fair call :) I think it doesn't help that I've become quite opinionated about veganism, I suppress it in real life but on here it tends to pop up :p
I'm not a very pushy person so to be honest, he probably wouldn't even notice me mentioning animal stuff. At the moment I've just been asking him how it's going and what he had for tea (I'm all about stealing good recipe ideas, and he's apparently a good cook!), so I think I'm going to wait until/if he brings the animal part up, and go from there.

Eat Y'self Fitter
Aug 4th, 2010, 05:28 PM
I've been thinking about this a lot lately and to the essence of the word Vegan than no one following a plant based diet for some other reason than the idea of Animal rights would not correctly be labeled as a Vegan for definitions sake.

However, lately I've been doing a ton of reading on nutrition this summer and it's quiet scientifically proven that a plant based diet can prevent and cure many diseases. If people finally realize this connection between animal foods and poor health, it'll really start something. If you can't get people to give a damn about animals the least you can do is get them to give a damn about themselves since many people are self-centered. I think if people understand the health values of a plant-based diet, and start dropping the animal foods they'll start to make a lot of connections. Maybe they'll start caring about the environment etc.. etc...

In a way veganism or at the very least a plant based diet is the greatest example of karma I can think of. If you're diet causes a lot of pain, suffering and death, you in turn suffer. However a more peaceful diet, well you know where I'm going.

harpy
Aug 5th, 2010, 12:14 PM
Yes I agree, EYF. I also think that there are quite a lot of people who aren't 100% happy with using animal products because of the cruelty/exploitation aspect, and/or the environmental aspect, but think they have no alternative because they need to eat them to stay healthy. If you start eating vegan food for whatever reason and find that in fact you feed as good as or better than before, then you may begin questioning that inevitability and decide to try and avoid other forms of exploitation as well.

VeganLu
Aug 5th, 2010, 01:42 PM
I rather have people become vegan for the animals, but I'll take whatever I can get. But they must understand that vegan is not just about food. I find this to be a problem with so-called vegans. They really are strict vegetarians, not vegan. :pissed_ani:

Adena
Aug 6th, 2010, 05:06 PM
I don't really mind what reason people go vegan for, but I think everyone should be educated about what really happens to the animals - because I think it's extremely important, and if I had've known before I found out I would have turned vegan long before I did.
I hate the term "strict vegetarian" - the word "strict" sounds like no fun, no thrills, all rules and only salad-style living.

Keane
Aug 30th, 2010, 12:29 PM
We pedants are the guardians of the English language :)