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vava
Oct 8th, 2008, 07:32 PM
artisan bread in 5 minutes a day is a revolution - check it out on you tube.

fiamma
Oct 8th, 2008, 07:43 PM
Thanks for the heads-up vava; interesting how it needs no kneading, but it takes more than five minutes :mad: (sorry, I'm being pedantic)

Also I don't like how they're pushing their book...

Thanks though, I may try it someday! (how do I know how much water to put in? Just add to the flour till I get the right consistency??)

Mahk
Oct 8th, 2008, 07:52 PM
I think they mean the bake time is only 5 minutes? :confused: [that does seem too short, I admit]
There were a few videos about this on Youtube but this is the one I watched
JFJZPm-_2-M

vava
Oct 8th, 2008, 07:53 PM
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=JFJZPm-_2-M&feature=related

vava
Oct 8th, 2008, 07:55 PM
they make it in 5 mins and then there is fermentation time and then you just stick the dough in the fridge . then just take some off each day as u need it.

fiamma
Oct 8th, 2008, 07:58 PM
Thanks for that Mahk, that makes things a bit clearer.

And thanks again to vava for the heads up!!!

But I'm looking for tried and tested recipes... anyone?

vava
Oct 8th, 2008, 08:03 PM
hmm dont really know what u mean - this has been tried and tested many times by me and loads of others in my family.....

fiamma
Oct 8th, 2008, 11:57 PM
What I mean is in the sense of varying the ingredients, using different types of flour, seeds, fruit... sorry, thought the question was clear.

khadagan
Feb 1st, 2011, 05:32 PM
I'm having a thing for homemade olive bread at the moment..just thought I'd share ;)

harpy
Feb 1st, 2011, 07:10 PM
How do you make the olive bread, khadagan, please?

Just calculated that I have been regularly making my own bread (in a bread machine) for over 3 years! Must be the longest time I've done anything...I always make the same kind though.

Back-Space
Feb 1st, 2011, 10:39 PM
Ooo, nice thread :p Do you have to use bread flower? I bought 100% whole grain barley flour as it was the healthiest. I got some measuring cups, steel bowl, cutting board and a thermometer. I wanted to make my own bread but I've never done it before. I was also looking for a cast iron bread pan but never found one, so I was thinking about shaping it while it's expanding(like in a bowl or something) then just cooking it on a cast iron skillet. Any suggestions?

twinkle
Feb 1st, 2011, 10:57 PM
Back-Space I don't see why that wouldn't work, although I'm not sure how much gluten barley flour contains so you might not get a very light result. I'd start off with a smallish quantity of ingredients and see how you get on - I have a simple recipe with 1 pound of flour, 1/2 pint lukewarm water, 1 teaspoon of instant yeast and a glug of oil and about a teaspoon salt. Shove them all together, knead, add more flour or water to get a good consistency. Leave it to rise for an hour or two in the bowl and then shape, put in the skillet and leave to rise again (you could, as you suggest, shape it and then transfer it, but I always worry about knocking out the air doing that). If your skillet doesn't have very high sides and that amount of dough fills it before it's risen a second time you might consider doing it in 2 batches, leaving half the dough in the mixing bowl.

Edit to add: When you say "cooking it on a skillet" do you mean on top of a stove, rather than in an oven? I'm sure it's possible but I haven't tried it myself...

Back-Space
Feb 1st, 2011, 11:21 PM
Back-Space I don't see why that wouldn't work, although I'm not sure how much gluten barley flour contains so you might not get a very light result. I'd start off with a smallish quantity of ingredients and see how you get on - I have a simple recipe with 1 pound of flour, 1/2 pint lukewarm water, 1 teaspoon of instant yeast and a glug of oil and about a teaspoon salt. Shove them all together, knead, add more flour or water to get a good consistency. Leave it to rise for an hour or two in the bowl and then shape, put in the skillet and leave to rise again (you could, as you suggest, shape it and then transfer it, but I always worry about knocking out the air doing that). If your skillet doesn't have very high sides and that amount of dough fills it before it's risen a second time you might consider doing it in 2 batches, leaving half the dough in the mixing bowl.

Edit to add: When you say "cooking it on a skillet" do you mean on top of a stove, rather than in an oven? I'm sure it's possible but I haven't tried it myself...

I meant in the oven :p I got the cast iron pan so I could do that. It's big enough to do anything I'm going to cook, and versatile so I don't have to buy 20 different pans :p I was thinking like a basic bread(as I'd butter it anyhow) with sesame seeds since they seem to be loaded with calcium :p

Back-Space
Feb 1st, 2011, 11:23 PM
And almost completely off-topic, but does anyone know why the Bible describes a meal specifically as unleavened bread? I've come across it a few times and I'm not sure why it matters/

twinkle
Feb 1st, 2011, 11:26 PM
Isn't it because the original people who had to survive on unleavened bread were stuck out in the desert and presumably only had access to basic ingredients? Urm, that's mostly random guesswork based on a vague childhood rememberance of the story, by the way :)

Back-Space
Feb 1st, 2011, 11:33 PM
Lol, I've got no idea :p I've been trying to read the Bible, but can't translate the way it's written. Trying to find something else to explain all the verses, so I could read the verse and read what it means. I got like halfway through Genesis and understood almost all of it, but now I'm onto the stories of Abram and can't seem to figure the chapters out.

Anyhow... Do you need sugar in the recipe aswell? I watched one video and the yeast needs something to eat, doesn't it? Just trying for a really basic, more healthy than tasty, loaf of bread :p

twinkle
Feb 1st, 2011, 11:34 PM
If you've got instant yeast it shouldn't need sugar, although it won't hurt to put a pinch in. If you're making up dried yeast the instructions will probably call for you to activate it in water with some sugar. I sometimes use agave syrup or maple syrup instead, which also seem to work fine.

Back-Space
Feb 1st, 2011, 11:42 PM
Alrighty. I might give this a try tomorrow :) Thanks

khadagan
Feb 2nd, 2011, 01:56 AM
How do you make the olive bread, khadagan, please?

Just calculated that I have been regularly making my own bread (in a bread machine) for over 3 years! Must be the longest time I've done anything...I always make the same kind though.

I've used a bread machine for about 5 years myself and loved the ease of it. When I moved countries last year I had to get rid of it and I have been making bread by hand here. I haven't gotten around to getting a new machine yet and so far am happy making bread by hand, I like it that you don't have to measure anything because I'm a bit lazy like that anyway. :)

So I have no exact recipe for you, but I can tell you how I make it and I've found this an excellent and quick way of making bread by hand.
For the olive bread I'll mix in a bowl:
1-2 cups wholemeal flour
yeast
salt
sugar
generous glug of olive oil
either water, or lately I've omitted the water and put in a tin of tomato veggie juice, makes a nice pinkish loaf
at this stage I'll also add 2 big handfuls of olives, about half a cup of sunflower seeds and half a cup of pumpkin seeds.

I'll have my three-year old mix this slightly watery mix up, she loves it!

I'll stick it straight in a pre-heated lukewarm oven for 30 mins to an hour

When you take it out it has doubled in size. then I mix in the amount of flour to make it into a proper dough. I like to be more unhealthy here and just use white flour at this stage. Knead it for about 10 minutes, I have a huge bowl I'm using for the entire process which is not so messy and easy and quick to clean as well.

I'll divide it into buns on a tray or a big flattish loaf, leave it to rise for at least another hour in the oven. Then bake it at about 390 degrees Fahrenheit for 20-30 mins depending on the size of the loaf or buns I've shaped.

It's absolutely fantastic. There's nothing better than homemade bread I think, especially with olives ;).

harpy
Feb 2nd, 2011, 02:09 AM
Thank you, khadagan - I don't think I'd persevere with regular breadmaking without a machine (have tried it before and didn't - might be better if I had a three-year-old human mixer ;) )

But I'll make an exception for this because it sounds lovely

khadagan
Feb 2nd, 2011, 02:15 AM
Thank you, khadagan - I don't think I'd persevere with regular breadmaking without a machine (have tried it before and didn't - might be better if I had a three-year-old human mixer ;) )

But I'll make an exception for this because it sounds lovely

I'll send my daughter over to help you with the mixing, mixing things with a spoon in a big bowl is one of her favourite activities! ;)

Good luck Harpy, let me know how you got on when you decide to give it a go

Back-Space
Feb 2nd, 2011, 02:57 AM
I'll send my daughter over to help you with the mixing, mixing things with a spoon in a big bowl is one of her favourite activities! ;)

Good luck Harpy, let me know how you got on when you decide to give it a go

Good, while she's over there you can come over here and show me how to do this :p Just another quick question or two for you guys. After you let it rise, you can knock the air out of it again so it's back to the way it was originally right? If I formed it the way I wanted and cooked it immediately without letting it rise, what would be the result? Un-fluffy bread? Is that alright to do? Also, about how long does the bread last? I've never made my own, so without the preservatives would it last as long as a week? Lol, I'm thinking I'm going to try making some tomorrow as long as I get everything all figured out here :p

Risker
Feb 2nd, 2011, 04:18 AM
I use a machine as well but I do it often so I'll try and give some advice.

Unrisen bread doesn't just make it un-fluffy, it makes it inedible.

I think home baked bread lasts about 5 days in an air tight container, it won't be so good towards the end though. I think bread made by hand may be more prone to mould as you'll have added bacteria making it but it's usually dry and unpleasant before it goes mouldy anyway.

There's a widely spread idea that putting bread in the fridge will cause it to go stale faster. It would only be true if you put the bread in unwrapped due to the constant air circulation so if you've got room put it in the fridge in a sealed container.

khadagan
Feb 2nd, 2011, 04:27 AM
Good, while she's over there you can come over here and show me how to do this :p Just another quick question or two for you guys. After you let it rise, you can knock the air out of it again so it's back to the way it was originally right? If I formed it the way I wanted and cooked it immediately without letting it rise, what would be the result? Un-fluffy bread? Is that alright to do? Also, about how long does the bread last? I've never made my own, so without the preservatives would it last as long as a week? Lol, I'm thinking I'm going to try making some tomorrow as long as I get everything all figured out here :p

I know when you read about making bread properly they knead it an extra time, but I never bother, I don't find a huge difference and I'm very happy with the outcome every time. I find the bread I make is nice and fluffy. I do also find that if you let it rise the last time for a longer time it will be a lot lighter and fluffier. I've made it before in the morning then actually forgot about it until I came in the late afternoon and then baked it, it's very light then and really lovely, you can never get it like that in a breadmaker. So if fluffyness is what you're after you can consider letting it rise a long time.

Should you bake it immediately without the final rise, I've done that a few times when in a hurry, I put the bread in the oven while it's warming up so it gets a bit of a rise. It won't get very much, the bread will be a bit denser. The baking time might vary a bit as well when you do this because denser bread takes longer to bake and you really don't want it to be raw on the inside and too dark on the outside. If you're in a real hurry to bake it I suppose you could flatten it out or make it into buns to make sure it will cook evenly then. I would really recommend it to rise at least 30 minutes or better at least an hour for a nice result though.

I never had the result of an unfluffy bread unless I actually forgot to add an ingredient like yeast or oil or such.

If I'm really desperate to eat the bread asap at that point what I sometimes then do is roll (some of the dough) out flat and bake them as tortilla's in a dry baking pan. But then again if I'm that desperate usually I just make a tortilla with flour, baking powder, margarine, salt and bake that.

I find it hard to say how long the bread lasts because in our house it's usually eaten within 1-2 days.. I never use preservatives. If you have too much you can freeze it as well and keep it fresh. Some older bread you can use for toasting as well for instance if it dries out a bit. I think it would last a week, but it depends on how you keep it. When you keep some in the fridge it will keep longer. In the summer it won't keep a week, so I would definately keep it in the fridge then. Every now and then I have a bit of bread that doesn't get eaten, usually just the bits of bread that were cut off funny, I just throw them in the dehydrator and use them later for croutons in soups.

The best way to learn to make bread is just to go for it. I find it very satisfying and such a treat as well. It's never like what you buy in the store, but much better. And you'll learn a lot from your mistakes as well, soon you'll be loving it so much that you never want to go back ;). Well that's what it was like for me anyway!

Good luck! :)

Back-Space
Feb 2nd, 2011, 04:30 AM
I use a machine as well but I do it often so I'll try and give some advice.

Unrisen bread doesn't just make it un-fluffy, it makes it inedible.

I think home baked bread lasts about 5 days in an air tight container, it won't be so good towards the end though. I think bread made by hand may be more prone to mould as you'll have added bacteria making it but it's usually dry and unpleasant before it goes mouldy anyway.

There's a widely spread idea that putting bread in the fridge will cause it to go stale faster. It would only be true if you put the bread in unwrapped due to the constant air circulation so if you've got room put it in the fridge in a sealed container.

Unrisen bread would be more like a giant cracker, right? :p I'll have to divide a recipe up and make bread every 2 or 3 days. Don't think I'll be able to eat the recipes worth in 5 days :p