PDA

View Full Version : Teetotal, no alcohol - support



Pages : 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9

eggplant
Aug 22nd, 2006, 11:24 PM
I've been a teetotaler for a few years now, mostly because I realized that alcohol didn't agree with my digestive tract (I'm not sure why it took me 20 years to figure that out!). The nice side effects are that I also save money and cut calories. My bf hardly ever drinks and I don't go to bars much anymore, so it doesn't affect me that much. I just drink water if I'm with people at a bar, and they never seem to care. If you're used to hanging out with friends for whom alcohol is an important part of their lifestyle, I can see how it would be awkward for you, but why should they care whether you drink or not? I would question the nature of those friendships if this is a huge issue for them.

RachelJune
Apr 25th, 2007, 10:54 PM
.

sprite1986
Apr 25th, 2007, 11:00 PM
Same with me recently. I just haven't been drinking that much, and when I do, I feel really terrible the next morning, which is actually enough to put me off drinking the night before. :(

RachelJune, I know what you mean about feeling pure. When I have drunk the night before, I feel really clogged up and unhealthy the day after (not just hungover), and it takes me a day and a half before I feel healthy again, and free of 'toxins' (haha).

Marrers
Apr 26th, 2007, 03:47 AM
Interesting thread although I've only had time to read the last 2 pages so far.

I've just done 4 weeks without alcohol and feel no better or different at all - which is a bit disappointing as it would be an incentive to cut down or give up. (I gave up for almost 6 weeks last year with the same lack of effect.)

I was just wondering how long was it before you felt the health benefits? Have I just not been alcohol-free for long enough? I would have thought I'd see the effects by now. :(

berta_the_aspie
Apr 26th, 2007, 10:32 PM
ur not meant to actually FEEL the health benefits on ur body. i mean carnivores could say the same thing about goin vegan: "its been a month - i dont feeel anything" but that doesnt mean that theyre not healthier. (just like the poll we had here on the forum - some people voted that they felt no difference what so ever)

Korn
Apr 27th, 2007, 12:05 AM
some people voted that they felt no difference what so ever)
(...but most people did feel a difference (http://www.veganforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=376).) :)

berta_the_aspie
Apr 27th, 2007, 12:23 AM
well yeah i felt a huge difference when goin vegan, but i dunno about goin sober cause i have never had a drink so i cant say. i'm just comparing here. my point is everyone who go vegan and sober will feel a psychological positive effect which is good, so they might not need to feel a physical effect on their body to keep on stayin sober...

Marrers
Apr 27th, 2007, 02:21 AM
i have never had a drink so i cant say. . . my point is everyone who go vegan and sober will feel a psychological positive effect . .

. . feel no better or different at all

Like I said I feel no different at all - that includes no psychological effect and none of the things normally associated with giving up drinking when you have been a regular drinker.

I was asking those who have given up drinking for their experiences Berta - you do not have any experiences in this area if you have not ever even had one alcoholic drink, so I'm not sure why you feel the need to deliver your opinions in such a spikey manner - "your point" seems not to be based on any facts or even anything you have heard or read. :confused:

berta_the_aspie
Apr 27th, 2007, 09:38 AM
uhm oh so I've no facts whats that about? you don't know that for all you know I could be an expert on alcoholism with a PHD.
I'm not tryin to be a besserweissser here or anything I was just trying to encourage you to keep on tryin to go sober - even tho you feel no different yet. and even tho you don't feel any better psychologically/psysically it is proven that its healthy to stay sober so surely your psysical health must be better (without you actually feeling it)

auntierozzi
Apr 27th, 2007, 09:50 AM
I drink alcohol very rarely. It hasn't always been the case. In my late teens and early twenties I just couldn't go to a party with out needing to feel a bit merrier than usual..Over the years I have gained in confidence and realized that alcohol has a really big and bad effect on me. I become quickly, very silly..and I don't really like that feeling. It's not really me! I want to experience life with my eyes wide open and my heart 100% in it. I will have an occasional glass but it really is occasional.

Marrers
Apr 27th, 2007, 10:50 AM
. . .for all you know I could be an expert on alcoholism with a PHD.
Well I assume if you were you would have said so in your reply to Korn.


. . .I was just trying to encourage you to keep on tryin to go sober - even tho you feel no different yet.
In that case thankyou for your efforts. :)

owen
Apr 30th, 2007, 08:27 AM
I've just done 4 weeks without alcohol and feel no better or different at all - which is a bit disappointing as it would be an incentive to cut down or give up. (I gave up for almost 6 weeks last year with the same lack of effect.)

I was just wondering how long was it before you felt the health benefits? Have I just not been alcohol-free for long enough? I would have thought I'd see the effects by now. :(

Hi Marrers,

Here's my take on it: my ex-wife stopped drinking the same time as I did. She didn't notice any difference to her life at all. She stopped just to give me a bit of support, which was decent of her.

I'm a recovering alcoholic. I've not had a drink since 2005 except for one this year at which point I realised I was on the top of a particularly slippery slope for me so I edged away from the precipice. My experience of stopping drinking was very different to my ex-wife's.

And that's because alcohol means entirely different things to us. But the big difference is in our heads, not our bodies.

How much were you drinking?

We're all different but you usually have to be putting away a lot of units a week to feel a physical difference. I've known alcoholics who come to meetings put away well over 100 units a week and not have any physical problems upon stopping.

Wishing you all the best in stopping anyhow.


Owen -- sober and happy

treehugga
May 16th, 2007, 11:53 AM
I think the biggest issue for me was adapting socially. it does feel a bit left out if your one of the few non drinkers, but eventually you get used to it.
My husband gave up alcohol and other drugs about 7 years ago and doesn't miss them not. I also gave up to support him and he gave up meat etc to support me. It's a small sacrifice really.

It's important to remember that alcohol is a poison which is why you get intoxicated. Another reason to leave it alone.

RedWellies
May 16th, 2007, 06:06 PM
I also gave up to support him and he gave up meat etc to support me.
That's lovely, Treehugga.

Jjt
May 17th, 2007, 02:45 AM
I just gave up drinking recently too.I wasn't overdoing it really, but I was drinking alot of beers because I think I have a really high tolerance. I bought a lot of high end beers because I thought it give me better outlook/mentallity about it. From what I can recall about trying to find information about the dangers of alchohol, there isn't near as much information as I would have thought for such a widely used substance. One big thing that I learned is that alchohol doesn't from what I read actually kill brains cells, but it does damage the ends of the nerve receptors or something like that because alchohol causes them them expand and they expand too much and get damaged. But apparently they can repair themselves. Anyways, this is probably the second worse I've heard about alchohol damage. The first is that I was in a lesson about drug abuse and they showed theses sort of xrays of brains of different people doing drugs but they showed the brain waves or something like that and some looked worse than others but the one that was supposed to be a long time alcholic looked like it was melting. It was really bad and I knew nomatter what anbody said that that was really messed up. If you know any long term alchoholics like I have seen they can have permanant impairments and they talk and act like they're drunk even when they're not. Maybe that's some motivation for you not to drink if you think you're drinking too much. There's also other damage like liver and other organ damage.

It sounds like though perhaps you just want to stop drinking for personal/spirital reasons or other reasons besides drinking too much. That is why I stopped drinking because although It did help calm my nerves somewhat, it also numbed me down and took away my heart to an extent. I think that life is much more enjoyable experience sober. But alchohol in moderation is enjoyable too. If you want some information I would just look up "reasons to not drink on the internet" or " harmful effects of alchohol" or something like that. Or just check out a book at the library I'm sure there's something there too.

My best advice for quitting anything is you have to discipline yourself to not want it. I've found that for myself when I quit cigarettes, nothing helped until I truly did not want it. I think for a lot of people, if they really want something they'll go for it sooner or later. It defenitely requires self control too. I really also think it's bad to get yourself into that " I'm a recovering addict, and I'll always be an addict mentallity". It's good to remind yourself that you 're not using that, but also it's time to move on with you're life. There's some people who are weighed down by drug/alchohol addiction and they don't even use drugs. I wrote this list down last week or maybe the week before I think just to give me a quick reminder why I shouldn't be drinking. I'm a Christian so some of this contains Christian reasons, but it's just to give you some ideas if you want.

Reasons not to drink

1. It costs to much, and I can't afford it. It takes away money I coulkd give to God and others.
2.I am extremely prone to becoming an alchoholic, and I drink more than I would like to.
3. It's a bad way of dealing with my problems.
4.It's really not that great anyway.
5.Drunkeness is sin.
6.Being sober is much better.
7.It's not a good example to others, and it gives me a bad image. ( how much I was drinking)
8. It's a burden, and it makes me act foolishly, and stimulates the flesh.
9.It keeps me from prayer as much, and studying Gods word.

One last thing is I think cooking as a hobby is a great way to get some stimuli without drinking. At least that works for me I think, and sleeping also. Sleeping can be a great way to get rid of that nervousness you might have.

Jjt
May 17th, 2007, 03:13 AM
It's important to remember that alcohol is a poison which is why you get intoxicated.


Not trying to go off topic but from what I've studied this isn't true at all, and I think there is a lot of teetotallers who probably push this idea around, but I think it's bad information and it's wrong to push this around.

From what I read it has to do with how you body digests it. If you drink more than your body can properly digest in a certain time, then toxins are released into your body. You can search for it and find more information on it, but here is just one page I quickly found.

here is a short page on "alchohol is a poison" ( http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/Controversies/1119724191.html (http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/Controversies/1119724191.html))

A poison is any substance that is capable of causing injury, illness or death to an organism. 1 (http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/Controversies/references/1119724191.html#1) Salt, water and oxygen are all poisons because in high enough quantities they can harm people. Too much salt in a diet can cause serious health problems, hyper hydration can kill athletes, and too much oxygen given to a premature infant can cause permanent blindness.
Toxicologists emphasize that “the dosage makes the poison.” Although salt, water, oxygen, aspirin, alcohol beverages, and many other substances can cause poisoning in excessive amounts, it makes no sense to call them poisons.


(“ETHYL ALCOHOL IS A POISON. No intelligent person knowingly ingests poison unless they want to die prematurely.” 4 (http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/Controversies/references/1119724191.html#4) )


So why do so many groups and organizations insist on calling alcohol a poison? Apparently to stigmatize alcoholic beverages and frighten people into alcohol abstinence. The tactic was first used effectively by the Anti-Saloon League, the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, the KKK and other anti-alcohol groups. 2 (http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/Controversies/references/1119724191.html#2) The technique is still widely used today. 3 (http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/Controversies/references/1119724191.html#3)
Honest communication doesn’t mislead or deceive. Calling alcohol a poison is misleading and deceptive.

References

1. Department of Environmental Health & Safety, University of Michigan. Poison. (http://www.dehs.umn.edu/homeiaq/glossary_frame.html#p); (http://www.dehs.umn.edu/homeiaq/glossary_frame.html#p);) Natural Resources Defense Council. Poison (http://www.nrdc.org/reference/glossary/p.asp); (http://www.nrdc.org/reference/glossary/p.asp);) Wikipedia. Poison (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poison (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poison))
2. Hanson, David J. Preventing Alcohol Abuse: Alcohol, Culture, and Control. Westport, CT: Praeger, 1995. See also “The Ku Klux Klan (KKK), Alcohol, and Prohibition” (http://www2.potsdam.edu/alcohol-info/Controversies/1107362364.html) (http://www2.potsdam.edu/alcohol-info/Controversies/1107362364.html)). The Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) insisted that “Medical writers, without exception, class alcohol as a poison.” However, the scientists of the Committee of Fifty for the Investigation of the Liquor Problem reported that this was an erroneous assertion. Billings, John S., et al. (for the Committee of fifty for the Investigation of the Liquor Problem). Physiological Aspects of the Liquor Problem. Boston & NY: Houghton Mifflin, 1903. However, even today, the WCTU insists that “alcohol is a poison” (http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:Xwx2ymGV1eMJ: (http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:Xwx2ymGV1eMJ:)
www.wctu.org/hearing_alcoholhealthclaims.html (http://www.wctu.org/hearing_alcoholhealthclaims.html)
+%22Alcohol+is+a+poison%22&hl=en) as does the Prohibition National Committee of the Prohibition Party (http://www.prohibition.org/statesman_200406.PDF) (http://www.prohibition.org/statesman_200406.PDF)). It insists that “ETHYL ALCOHOL IS A POISON. No intelligent person knowingly ingests poison unless they want to die prematurely.”
3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and SAMHSA’s National Clearinghouse for Alcohol & Drug Information. Black History Month. “Alcohol is a toxin or poison.“ (http://www.health.org/seasonal/blackhistory/diabetes.aspx); (http://www.health.org/seasonal/blackhistory/diabetes.aspx);) Students Against Destructive Decisions or SADD (formerly Students Against Drunk Driving) Silent Killer. “Alcohol is a poison.”(http://bhs.broo.k12.wv.us/BHS/Clubs/SADD/A-Poising.htm); (http://bhs.broo.k12.wv.us/BHS/Clubs/SADD/A-Poising.htm);) Washington State Coalition to Reduce Underage Drinking. “alcohol is a poison” (http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:kUfisHHIXmoJ:clearinghouse.adhl.org/ (http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:kUfisHHIXmoJ:clearinghouse.adhl.org/)
campaigns/ruad/ed_art.html+%22Alcohol+is+a+poison%22&hl=en); Parent Resources and Information on Drug Education (PRIDE) Alcohol alert “Alcohol is a poison“(http://www.pride.org/alcohol.htm); (http://www.pride.org/alcohol.htm);) the Seventh-Day Adventist Church. “Alcohol is a poison.” (http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache: (http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:)
L_JgRvexUuwJ:news.adventist.org/ data/2000/04/
0959715024/index.html.en+%22Alcohol+is+a+poison%22&hl=en)
4. Prohibition National Committee - Prohibition Party. The National Statesman, 2004, 70(4), 3 (http://www.prohibition.org/statesman_200406.PDF) (http://www.prohibition.org/statesman_200406.PDF)).

treehugga
May 17th, 2007, 11:59 AM
yes. its worked out well for both of us and our kids :)

frank language
Jun 28th, 2007, 03:35 AM
You may already have been following the tenents of sXe without knowing it exists. If that's the case, claiming won't have that big an impact on your life, except compressing different areas of your lifestyle into one convenient phrase or label.
That's what I find; I fit into sXe enough without having consciously gone into it. I quit drinking and drugs 18 years ago simply because I'd had enough; also, I couldn't tolerate them anymore and to continue would have been literally suicidal.

Quitting drinking laid the foundation for my eventually giving up--or I prefer to day "getting rid of" dairy and meat almost six years ago. I wish it had been sooner. Actually, when I first quit drinking, I started smoking and smoked (tobacco) for about five years before I put that down. We can always fine-tune our acts, and there are still things I find difficult about veganism; it's one day at a time, as they say. It's great to have the support here.

Gorilla
Jun 28th, 2007, 05:12 PM
i'm avoiding alcohol almost completely at the moment, because every time i've had even just one drink recently it's made me feel quite depressed. it used to only affect me occasionally but i'm now finding i can't tolerate the depressive effects at all any more.

fiamma
Jun 28th, 2007, 05:24 PM
I'm the same Gorilla - I find drinking really does nothing for me any more, and here you need a car to get anywhere at night so I'm kind of forced to anyway :)

It feels good to have a clear head in the mornings too.

emmapresley
Jun 28th, 2007, 05:49 PM
i drink way too much..periodically..intermittent binge drinking...i think i may have an addictive personality and am either an *all or nothing* type...but am on a no drinking thing atm. think all this stuff is hereditary..my dad died a particularly violent death through alcoholism and my grandad died with excessive alcohol use as a contributory factor. it scares me a little bit that it's so easy to get hold of and so socially acceptable. i love drinking, being drunk but don't like how it makes me get a little bit psycho in the noggin and how crappy i feel after drinking. soo..non for me for a bit.

i haven't though, found that i feel significantly better if i don't have any for a while..i just know that now im 35 yrs old, it just seems a lot harder to recover from loads of wine or whatever. :confused:

apologies if this doesn't help..just bunging in my thoughts :)

cobweb
Jun 28th, 2007, 07:09 PM
I don't touch the stuff - haven't for around 2 years now. The only thing I find is that I often get/feel excluded if and when there are social occasions, being vegan AND teetotal :rolleyes: .

RachelJune
Jun 28th, 2007, 10:42 PM
i'm avoiding alcohol almost completely at the moment, because every time i've had even just one drink recently it's made me feel quite depressed. it used to only affect me occasionally but i'm now finding i can't tolerate the depressive effects at all any more.

Definately a wise idea, Gorilla :)

Speaking from personal experience, depression + alcohol = very, very bad news!! In particular, alcohol and antidepressants combined are a recipe for disaster :eek: Please just don't do it.

Maybe it works differently for everyone, but I made this mistake in the past and the result wasn't pretty :( I also know a person who went completely off the edge and ended up in hospital recently because he didn't realise how dangerous it was to drink when taking anti-depressants.

For most people alcohol can be enjoyed quite safely in moderation and I don't see a problem with that, although I personally choose not to drink at all. But remember alcohol is a depressant, and so those who already have depressive tendencies should certainly stay well clear. It might seem to block out your problems for a little while, but in reality it only makes things far worse.

Gorilla
Jun 28th, 2007, 10:46 PM
i'm not taking anti-depressants at the moment, but i know from past experience it's definitely best not to drink at all while taking them. at the moment i feel depressed almost as soon as i've had a drink, the effect is immediate. so i haven't even been enjoying drinking and then feeling bad afterwards. still, it's healthier i suppose.

Ginger
Jun 29th, 2007, 02:57 PM
I haven't had a drink for 10 days now, partly for weight loss reasons but also as I had been drinking way too much :( I'm not very strong willed when I walk into Sainsburys and they have buy one get one free on boxes of 20 bottles of beer :eek: I was pretty disgusted at how quickly I was getting through them (aprox 4 bottles to my husbands' 1). I've always drunk too much, since I was a teenager. It has been lovely to go to bed with a clear head and wake up without a manky mouth :eek: . I have also noticed that my gums have stopped bleeding when I brush my teeth in the morning :) , it really worries me what damage I've been doing to myself. Don't know how long I'll keep it up for but at the moment I feel really good.