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Thread: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

  1. #301

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    Default Re: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

    This might be a silly question but have you tried Ebay?

  2. #302

    Default Re: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

    I get my D2 online. I use Deva brand, which is Vegan Society certified. The Deva website has a link that lists different places around the world that sell their products (online or in store). I saw a few listed for the U.K. but nothing for Ireland. I find their prices reasonable but then I am fortunate that there are places that sell Deva products in my country. Unfortunately for some stupid reason this last time I ordered the 2400 IU tablets and my body cant tolerate them, even if I cut them in half or thirds. My neck and face get brown spots all over and I just dont feel well. I was fine with the lower 800 IU dose. The only place in the city where I live I have been able to find ergocalciferol (d2) is at a particular health food store. I LOVE that store. Its just a hole in the wall and not too many people know about it but they have a lot of vegan friendly products. The upscale Whole Foods Coop I get my groceries at doesnt even carry ergocalciferol. I mentioned to the owner that they are the only place in Duluth that sells D2 supplements and to please not stop ordering them! I have in turn been helping to advertise them where I can. For anyone from Minnesota wanting to know its Betty Lous Health foods.

    At any rate ergocalciferol is very hard to find anymore in stores other than fortified in vegan friendly foods. I never buy any of my vitamins (DHA, calcium/magnesium, D2, B complex) in mainstream stores as the ingredients put into them are horrible. I dont know what people did before the age of the internet.

  3. #303

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    Default Re: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

    I just realised how little D2 my supplement has in it, 10 IU (200% RDA). Its the Vegan Societies own brand multi vitamin, but I also get some from margarine, non dairy milk and bread.

  4. #304
    Draíochta Blueberries's Avatar
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    Quote Firestorm
    bread.
    Do you make bread with D2 or buy it?
    Houmous atá ann!

  5. #305

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    Default Re: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

    I buy it - Burgen buckwheat and poppy seed bread

  6. #306
    CATWOMAN sandra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

    Quote Firestorm View Post
    This might be a silly question but have you tried Ebay?
    Haven't tried Ebay, Firestorm........I'll look into that option.
    I like Sandra, she keeps making me giggle. Daft little lady - Frosty

  7. #307
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

    I just came across this, and haven't double checked the info with other sources yet. But it seems that several types of mushrooms can provide vit. D, especially if they are re-exposed to sunlight for some time before ether are eaten. Or at least: it would be good with more research on this....
    http://www.health.com/health/gallery...4538_5,00.html
    Check to see if vitamin D–rich 'shrooms, like Dole's Portobello Mushrooms, are available at a store near you. They're perfect for vegetarians looking for plant-based foods that contain the vitamin. Dole's portobellos will give you 400 IUs of vitamin D per 3-ounce serving (about 1 cup of diced mushrooms).
    http://www.powerofmushrooms.com.au/h...ion/vitamin-d/

    Mushrooms naturally produce vitamin D when they see sunlight (or another source of UV light). Through the action of sunlight, they convert their abundant ergosterol to ergocalciferol (vitamin D2). Wild mushrooms in Europe commonly have 2-40 mcg vitamin D/100g (Mattila 1994; Mattila 2002; Teichman 2007).
    Farmers generally don’t subject their mushrooms to light other than during growing operations and harvesting, so cultivated mushrooms are low in vitamin D. Mushrooms from retail stores can have 1-5 mcg vitamin D per 100g, possibly due to UV light exposure in-store (University of Sydney analysis 2013, unpublished).
    Store-bought mushrooms are able to generate over 20 mcg per serve after being placed in sunlight for a couple of hours in the midday sun (Simon 2011; Phillips 2013). A study by the University of Sydney showed that leaving mushrooms in the midday winter sun for about an hour produced about 10 mcg of vitamin D in a 100g serve. That is a significant amount of vitamin D when you consider our daily requirements for vitamin D are 5-15 mcg, the higher level for older people.
    Unfortunately, mushrooms begin to shrivel and brown if they are left for extended periods in the sun so mushroom farmers have found a way to generate vitamin D conveniently just after they have harvested the mushrooms.
    If the mushrooms are exposed to a short burst of ultraviolet light after harvesting they quickly generate vitamin D, while retaining the good looks and nutrition of the mushroom. Once consumed, the vitamin D2 in mushrooms is converted to 1, 25 (OH) ergocalciferol. Both vitamin D2 and D3 act in the same way in the body.
    - See more at: http://www.powerofmushrooms.com.au/h....YrFAn3e6.dpuf
    http://mushroominfo.com/all-about-vitamin-d/

    For information on vitamin D and mushrooms from the United States Depart of Agriculture (USDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on vitamin D and mushrooms, see the following resources:


    Vitamin D helps build and maintain strong bones by helping the body absorb calcium. Vitamin D is available via diet, supplements and sunlight, which is why D is also referred to as the “sunshine vitamin.” Increased debate about the extended health benefits and required quantities of vitamin D prompted the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to conduct a 24-month review on dietary reference intakes (DRIs) for vitamin D and calcium. Results validated the importance of vitamin D for its role in promoting bone growth and maintenance, and for the first time ever, the committee set a recommended intake level for vitamin D – 600 IU.1
    The current recommended intake level of 600 IU is triple the value from 1997 that was previously considered adequate for most adults (200 IU).2 With a little more attention to food sources of vitamin D, Americans can achieve their D requirements through diet. When building your plate to maximize vitamin D, consider mushrooms. USDA’s National Nutrient Database – the foundation of most food and nutrition databases in the U.S. – includes the vitamin D values of many foods, but mushrooms stand out as the only source of vitamin D in the produce aisle and one of the few non-fortified food sources. In fact, the IOM recognizes them as the exception to the rule that plant foods don’t naturally contain vitamin D.





    3 Values are based on a single serving, which is 84 grams.


    The excerpt above from the USDA National Nutrient Database shows the vitamin D values for multiple mushroom varieties. All mushrooms contain vitamin D, but growers also have the ability to increase D levels by exposing mushrooms to ultraviolet light. Similar to humans, mushrooms naturally produce vitamin D following exposure to sunlight or a sunlamp: mushrooms’ plant sterol – ergosterol – converts to vitamin D when exposed to light. Exposing mushrooms to as little as five minutes of UV light can produce a significant quantity of vitamin D, demonstrating that this process could provide a significant, unique plant source of vitamin D for vegetarians and individuals who do not drink milk, the major fortified food source.4 While all mushrooms contain vitamin D at various levels, retailers currently offer a variety of light-exposed mushrooms which can provide close to 400 IU of vitamin D per serving (approximately 4-5 white button or crimini mushrooms, or one portabella).
    - See more at: http://mushroominfo.com/all-about-vi....iTuk2ULb.dpuf
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  8. #308
    Not currently a vegan
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    Default Re: Vegans, vitamin D and the sun

    We can give Vitamin D from the sun and also many other sources. Vegan foods contain most of the nutrients. It depends on the choice of each individual to think about their way of intake of vitamins.

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