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Thread: Vegans and calcium

  1. #1
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    Default Vegans and calcium

    From the 'Veganforum 1'-archive:

    globesetter Posted: Apr 3 2004, 03:22 PM

    I keep fairly good track of how much I eat of some main nutrients, like calcium, but I am always wondering if I am accurate enough, etc. I found this nifty calcium calculator - you have to fill out how often you eat the sample foods - takes about 10 minutes, and gives an average daily intake of calcium.

    http://www.calciuminfo.com/calculator/f5.htm

    I was happy to see my average is 922 mg per day! Even though this is just a ballpark figure, because its an average, and because I eat some foods with calcium that are not on the list, its nice to get confirmation I am close to what I should be getting.

    They didn«t have soy milk as an option on the list, so I used the 1% cow milk as a subsititute - my soy milk has the same calcium per cup as cow milk.

    Have fun.



    webster Posted: Apr 3 2004, 06:11 PM

    I would reply, but I am too busy dashing out the door to go buy calcium tablets ...

    123 out of 1000. Oh dear. And here I thought I was doing pretty good ...

    It was a bit of fun though, and very easy to use.



    patunia Posted: Apr 3 2004, 09:56 PM

    Yikes! Time to chow down on more broccoli! 166! I think my score is too low, because there's a lot I eat that wasn't on their lists. Plus I was in a bit of a hurry while filling it out.



    Guest: marinoa Posted: Apr 3 2004, 11:31 PM

    You can always log your food on fitday.com, you can also add any foods that are not in their database by entering values from the your food's nutrition label. I find that I easily meet the calcium requirements. I do get 60% from fortified OJ and fortified soy milk. the remainder I get from regular foods. sometimes tofu.



    tricia Posted: Apr 4 2004, 12:42 AM

    Wow mine was 1440.. i thought i was gonna be low.. guess not.. now im happy...



    sexyjacksparrow Posted: Apr 4 2004, 09:02 AM

    I got 720, whic is not perfect but is better than I thought. Most of what I get comes from fortified foods such as soya milk (I drink the chocolate flvoured stuff and have the normal on cereal).

    Kerry x



    globesetter Posted: Apr 4 2004, 09:29 AM

    Marinoa, thanks for fitday.com - that is a GREAT site - I wish I had it when I first went vegan!


    all the best,
    globesetter
    Last edited by tricia; Apr 23rd, 2004 at 12:29 AM.

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    tricia's Avatar
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    Vegan-pagan-homeschooling momma to Khaila (5) and felines Gamma (3) and Mickey (3 mnths) and new foster cat Holly (2)

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    I was wondering how much calcium I really get in a day. Thanks for the link.

  4. #4
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    Default Lack of calcium and B12 deficiency

    Hi,

    below are some (of many) sources that suggest that too little calcium can affect your vitamin B12 levels. According to "Vegans deficient in three nutrients - meat eaters in seven" and other sources, calcium is one of the most important nutrients vegans should pay attention to. (It's not difficult to get enough calcium, but you need to know where to find it).

    Vegans are known to have lower B12 levels than non-vegans, and to me, it doesn't look like there is one cause for the low B-12 levels among vegans, but many. Could lack of calcium be a more important part of the vegan/B12 issue than most people think?

    From http://www.livingwithms.co.uk/ms/nutrit.html :
    "B12 needs to be combined with Calcium for proper absorption"

    From http://foodsupplements.homestead.com/B12.html :
    " B-12 METHYLCOBALAMIN 1000 mcg 1 or 2 a day. Methylcobalamin is the preferred type. Cyanocobalamin must be converted to methyl or adenosyl cobalamin by the body. Required for fat and carbohydrate metabolism and formation of blood cells . Deficiency results in mental confusion ,anemia , homocystenia, brain damage, tinnitus ,asthma , and depression . B-12 deficiency leads to heart risk. ( Science News 2-16-02 ) May benefit multiple sclerosis patients. Deficiency is widespread in people over sixty years of age. Blood test to determine B-12 level is recommended. Alcohol, estrogen, oral contraceptives, sleeping pills interfere with utilization. Natural sources are liver, beef, pork, eggs, milk, and cheese , except where soil is deficient in cobalt . ( 19 ) Needs calcium for absorption. Microwave cooking destroys B-12."

    From http://www.chinatown-online.com/cons.../nutrition.htm
    "B12 Depleting Factors: Alcohol, coffee, tobacco, calcium deficiency."

    From http://www.noni-juice-distributor.us...t_glossary.htm :
    "Calcium (as calcium phosphate): the bodyês most abundant mineral. Every cell needs calcium to survive. Calcium is necessary for body synthesis of B12 and uses vitamin D for absorption. It works with phosphorus to build sound teeth and bones, with magnesium for cardiovascular health and skeletal strength. It helps blood clotting, lowers blood pressure, prevents muscle cramping, maintains nervous system health, controls anxiety and depression, and insures quality rest and sleep."

    From http://www.leaflady.org/cancer.htm
    About B12: "Utilization assisted by calcium. [...] More effective when taken with B complex and Vitamin C, Lecithin, Potassium, Calcium, and Sodium."


    From http://www.unhinderedliving.com/VitaminB12.html
    "When taking B12, it is a good idea to also supplement with calcium at the same meal, as calcium assists with absorption. There must also be hydrochloric acid present. A properly functioning thyroid gland also helps with absorption of B12"

    Finally, about calcium and tap water: (From http://www.pharo.com/health_and_heal...0_contents.asp )
    "Despite assurances from water companies, tap water is full of potentially dangerous chemicals - even, in some areas of Britain, including the highly controversial fluoride, and also probably residues from the contraceptive pill. Heavy metals in the water are believed to prevent the absorption of calcium. Natural water is high in calcium, necessary for strong teeth and bones, although the fizzy sort is also high in sodium (salt), so don't drink it often."
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  5. #5

    Default what is calcium carrageenan?

    I know it's a thickener in pudding but is it an animal biproduct?

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    Quote vegematarian
    I know it's a thickener in pudding but is it an animal biproduct?
    It's vegan. You can check ingredients here.

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    Default Excessive Calcium Causes Osteoporosis

    Must read
    www.4.waisays.com
    How Milk Causes Osteoporosis
    Auschwitz begins wherever someone looks at a slaughterhouse and thinks: they're only animals.
    -Theodor Adorno (1903-1969), German Jewish philosopher forced into exile by the Nazis

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    Default Calcium, Protien, B12

    alright here is my delema I am having an arguement with someone on another forum who claims humans need meat to have a natural diet so I need some natural ways to get B12, Protien and calcium. Don't get me wrong I am not an idiot I know how to get protien and calcium natuarly for the most part but I need your input.

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    Protein.
    B12 and thoughts on "Can a Natural Diet Require Supplements?".
    For information on diet of early humans' in relation to calcium please read peer-reviewed (scientific) articles by dr Loren Cordain, world's leading paleo-diet researcher. Although she is pro-meat, she explicitly states that humans did not use milk and dairy products for the most part of our existance and our bones were better then than they are now.

  10. #10

    Default calcium carbonate and other ingredients

    i was searching for something bready this morning, and cheerios seemed vegan friendly....but what about the ingredient "calcium carbonate"? is this an animal product? (i hope not cause i'm currently snacking on them) thanks if u know.
    Also. a while back someone posted a really comprehensive site about ingredients that u may not expect to be animal based. does anyone remember it?

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    http://www.veganpeace.com

    click the ingredients list

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    Calcium carbonate can me made of oyster shells, but it doesn't have to be that way. In fact, most calcium carbonate is vegan. Always write to manufacturer of the product containing CC.

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    Where Do You Get Your Calcium? A Play in One Act

    Characters:
    Narrator
    Bartender
    Person off the street

    Scene: Bartender in empty pub wiping bar with rag:

    Narrator: "The number one source of calcium in the American diet is milk. The number one source of saturated fat in the American diet is also milk. It all depends on what you want with your calcium."

    (Person of the street enters stage right; sits down on bar stool.)
    Person: "I'd like some calcium, please."

    Bartender: "How do you want it?"

    Person: "Straight up."

    Bartender: "Sorry, sir, we don't have any straight calcium, it all comes premixed."

    (Bartender goes back to wiping with his little bar rag)
    Person: "Well how do most people take it?"

    (Bartender sighs and takes out some milk (maybe in a black and white "cow" spotted pitcher and a glass)
    Bartender: "Most people take it this way. (He starts slowing pouring) where it comes premixed with saturated fat and cholesterol, and antibiotics and pesticides and paratuberculosis and pus..."

    Person: (Obviously distraught) "Pus! Is there any way I can get my calcium without the pus?!"

    (Bartender stops pouring)
    Bartender: (Quizzically) "No pus?"

    Person: "No pus."

    Bartender: "D'ya want the pus on the side?"

    Person: "No pus at all!"

    Bartender "Well, we do have calcium in dark green leafies, collard greens, kale,..."

    Person: (Hesitantly) "Well what does that come with?"

    Bartender: "Well, green leafy vegetables are probably among the most nutritious things on the planet. The calcium comes premixed with fiber and vitamin A and vitamin K and antioxidants and..."

    Person: (Pointing an accusing finger) "Pus?"

    Bartender: "No pus."

    Person: "Well, all right, but I'm not really a vegetable kinda person, is there anything else?"

    Bartender: "Calcium fortified orange juice."

    Person: "Yeah?"

    Bartender: "Calcium comes with vitamin C, potassium, folate, all with this kind of orangy finish."

    Person: (Eyebrows up) "Really?"

    Bartender: "D'ya want one?"

    Person: "Nah, I was really kinda hoping to have somethin' on my cereal."

    Bartender: (Now frustrated) "All right." (Bartenderbrings a carton down hard on the bar) "Fortified soy milk--iron, isoflavones, soy protein, phytochemicals--what d'ya say?"

    Person: (Suspiciously) "Any cholesterol"

    Bartender: "Sorry."

    Person: "Antibiotics?"

    Bartender: "Nope."

    Person: "Pesticides?"

    Bartender: "Nope." (Person starts pointing a finger) "And no pus."

    Person: "I'll take it!"

    (Bartender starts pouring into a bowl and keeps talking, fading away as curtain closes)
    Bartender: "Want some nuts? We got almonds, brazil nuts, sesame seeds... Got some figs too... Have you tried our pinto bean dip..."

    Vegan md

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    That is a really cool little play - they should make a televised version as a TC add for soya milk or for VIVA or the V society...


    Calcium for me as I rarely buy soya milk or fortified products:
    almonds
    kale
    dark leafy greens
    sesame seeds
    tahini

    Protein for me:
    tofu
    tempeh
    nuts and seeds
    beans and pulses and lentils

    B12:
    I eat lots of B12 Meridien yeast spread (like vegemite) but I have heard some controversial debates (and not from anti-veganists either) as to the usability of B12 in fortified foods such as this.

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    Default Coral Calcium

    I have been sprinkling coral calcium onto my oatmeal as a calcium supplement. Is coral calcium really safe and bio-available? The brand is Ocean Milk, if anyone has ever heard of that.

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    I haven't read anything about it, but I just saw this:


    Calcium 'lost' in soy, rice milk
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

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    does the calcium actually come from coral, because isn't coral technically an animal?

    "Corals look like plants, and they don't move around like a lot of animals, but they are animals. What we see as branches actually are whole colonies of coral animals. Each animal, called a polyp, has a hard skeleton and a soft body. This is attached to rock, or to the skeletons of dead polyps. What we sometimes see as flowers actually are the tentacles with which they capture food from the water."

    i just got that off the internet. i've never heard of Ocean Milk or coral calcium before, so if i've got the wrong end of the stick please let me know


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    I thought that sponge was an animal...but not coral...I am not sure if my calcium is actually coral though - I think it might be a seaweed, but I am not sure.

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    interesting. i take a 1000 mg tablet of tums before bed now. (calcium is supposed to make u sleepy, aswell as the fact that u shouldnt take it with a multivitamin or it will affect the absorbtion of other vitamins! i take my multi in the daytime now ) anyone know if thats a good way to get calcium? calcium is such a confusing issue. to get or not to get. ive read so much conflicting information but i suppose all u can do is make the best choice u can.
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

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    [QUOTE=foxytina_69](calcium is supposed to make u sleepy) [QUOTE]

    I heard that too...and I also don't know what to think all about that absorbtion stuff. It is too confusing. Everything conflicts with everything else!

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    well, heres a thought.

    my mother broke both of her legs by falling in the hospital when she had a stroke once. she had osteoporosis and her bones werent healing. they gave her tums everyday to up her calcium intake, and since they did that, her bones had fully healed back to normal (while she was dying so it helped immensely. she got to walk again before she died) without it, they wouldnt. it may not be true for everybody but if thats how it was for her, i assume i have similar body chemistry!
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

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    Yeah! I’ve noticed that there is often quite a lot of sludge left at the bottom of my Soya milk carton. So I scoop it out and use it cooking, in custard, in pasta source and my favourite is to mix it in with melted chocolate (it is really nice once it is solid again)

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    i've been using a liquid calcium supplement because i make my own soya milk. Soya Fresh, the company i buy my soya beans from, say that liquid calcium is absorbed better. it also contains with magnesium because that is supposed to help absorption. read what they say about it here: http://www.soyafresh.co.uk/supplemen...calciumfaq.htm
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    Question Calcium and Iron

    I am confused about calcium and iron - apparently they cancel each other out, like they cannot be consumed at the same meal. But I always see things like blackstrap molasses, figs, dates, tahini and even fortified soymilks claiming to be rich in both iron and calcium. So do you actually absorb anything? If so, is there a 'dominant' nutrient?

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    I don't think I've come across the idea that they cancel each other out - do you have a reference for that one, Banana?

    I did a web search and there seems to have been an experiment with rats suggesting some interaction between the two, but only with abnormally high intakes. And, of course, they were rats, not humans.

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    Excellent advice. I wouldn't take an iron supplement unless advised to by a doctor.

    And for calcium, broccoli and rice/oat/soy/almond milks are great sources! Don't forget that the 1,000 mg/day recommendation is for omnivores, who lose calcium in their urine due to all of the excess protein they eat every day. Some doctors say that 400-500 mg/day for a vegan is sufficient, since we don't usually get excess protein.
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    I was anaemic, and for 6 months was on potent iron supplements - now I am scared that my stores will deplete again

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    Does anyone know if it's possible to OD on calcium? Because I just got some calcium supplements and don't really know how much I should be taking. I know that I'm getting some calcium in my diet, but I'm pretty sure I'm not getting enough (it basically comes down to fortified soy milk), so I figured I could use some supplements. Lately, I've been taking two tablets a day (one tablet being a third of daily value), but maybe I don't really need that much... I'm not sure if I should be concerned.

  30. #30
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    Quote Hasha
    Does anyone know if it's possible to OD on calcium?
    I'm not a doctor or anything, but can't too much calcium give you kidney stones?

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    Quote John
    I'm not a doctor or anything, but can't too much calcium give you kidney stones?
    Oh. Well, I don't know, but I wouldn't be surprised. See, some B12 supplements will have over a hundred times the recommended DV. But a single calcium tablet will only have some 30-40%. So, to me, that suggests that you can take as much B12 as you like, but that you can OD on calcium.

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    Default calcium in mineral water

    I know one brand of mineral water which has more than 500mg of calcium per litre. It could be a good source, but... can our bodies absorb all those minerals in mineral water? If 'yes', then how much? 50%? 20%? 0%?

    Do you drink mineral water? Do you like it?
    I do, specially in summer when is hot and it's very tasty with a bit of lemon.

  33. #33
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    I found a study that confirms that your body absorbs calcium from mineral water as easily as it does from milk. (Osteoporosis International, vol 11, 2000). But, only bottles labeled "mineral water"- not "spring" or "artesian" are guaranteed to contain natural minerals and you get a lot more calcium with some brands than others.

  34. #34
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    I dont know how easy it is to look at this journal as it might be subscription only, i can see it at uni as we have subscriptions to a whole host of science/medical journals.

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    Default Re: calcium in mineral water

    I've found this in:
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association. [J Am Diet Assoc] 2002 Nov; Vol. 102 (11), pp. 1658-62.

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the contribution of mineral water containing different amounts of calcium and magnesium to the total dietary intakes of these minerals DESIGN: Matched case control study using data issued from the Supplementation en Vitamines et Minéraux Antioxydants (SU.VI.MAX) cohort. SUBJECTS: Subjects were water consumers-240 men and 424 women-divided into the following 4 groups (n=166 per group): regular drinkers of a calcium-rich and magnesium-rich mineral water (calcium, 486 mg/L; magnesium, 84 mg/ L), drinkers of a water classified as a moderately mineralized content (calcium, 202 mg/L; magnesium, 36 mg/L), drinkers of 2 low-mineralized waters (calcium, 9.9 to 67.6 mg/L and magnesium, 1.6 to 2 mg/L, respectively), and drinkers of tap waters. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Quantitative data were compared using student's t test. Mean comparisons were performed in multivariate analysis by analysis of variance. RESULTS: Dietary calcium intake provided by the various food groups did not differ between the 4 consumer groups, except for calcium provided by mineral water. According to its calcium concentration, mineral water may contribute to one fourth of the total daily calcium intake. Subjects who regularly drink mineral-rich water have a calcium intake that is significantly higher (P< 10(-3)) than those drinking either low-mineral-content water or tap water. Dietary magnesium intake provided by the various food groups did not differ between the 4 consumer groups, except for magnesium provided by mineral water. Depending on the magnesium concentration of the mineral water, it contributed 6% to 17% of total daily magnesium intake. Drinkers of magnesium-rich mineral water and water with a moderate mineral content had magnesium intakes significantly (P< 10(-3)) higher than those of drinkers on low-mineralized or tap water. APPLICATIONS: Mineral-rich water may provide an important supplementary contribution to total calcium and magnesium intake. For dietetics professionals, it may provide-in place of the usual recommendations concerning the consumption of dairy products-a good way to improve calcium and magnesium intakes, particularly in subjects who don't like dairy products.

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    Default Re: calcium in mineral water

    Another one:
    The British journal of nutrition. [Br J Nutr] 2005 Feb; Vol. 93 (2), pp. 225-31

    It is well known that the intestinal availability of Ca from Ca-rich mineral waters is equivalent to that of milk Ca. However, the effect of associated anions on Ca urinary loss needs to be addressed. The aim of the current study was to compare, under ordinary conditions of consumption, milk and a SO4-rich mineral water as the Ca provider in a large number of subjects consuming the same quantity of Ca from the two sources in a crossover study lasting for an extended period. Thirty-seven healthy women completed a 12-week protocol, divided into four periods of 3 weeks (W). In the first (W1-3) and third (W6-9) periods, dietary Ca intake was restricted to 600 mg/d. In the second (W4-6) and final (W10-12) periods, either 400 ml/d medium-fat milk or 1 litre of a Ca- and SO4-rich mineral water, each providing about 480 mg Ca/d, was added to the diet in a random manner. Dietary evaluation, blood and urinary measures were performed during the last week (W6 and W12) of each Ca supplementation period. The urinary excretion of Ca was higher (0.5 mmol/d more) with water than with milk (P<0.001). An examination of all the dietary factors known to influence calciuria suggested that the acidogenic action of SO4 was responsible for this increased calciuria. Thus, despite an equal Ca intake and assuming an unchanged intestinal absorption, these results suggest that Ca balance is better with milk consumption than with CaSO4-rich water.

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    Default Re: calcium in mineral water

    Journal of clinical gastroenterology. [J Clin Gastroenterol] 2004 Oct; Vol. 38 (9), pp. 761-6.

    GOALS: The study was designed to determine whether high-calcium mineral water is an efficient additional source of dietary calcium, optimizing a method for calcium determination never used for mineral waters. BACKGROUND: It is generally agreed that an adequate calcium intake is necessary for the acquisition of an ideal peak bone mass and for the maintenance of the bone mineral density in adults, in postmenopausal women, and in the elderly. Mineral waters are calorie free, and some, with high calcium levels, might be significant sources of calcium. STUDY: The availability of the calcium contained in a high-calcium mineral water was measured in 27 healthy subjects. In 8 subjects the calcium availability of the water was compared with the calcium availability ingested with milk at the same calcium load. Milk and water were labeled extrinsically with 30 mg Ca. Fractional absorption from the oral dose was determined from plasma samples using ICP-MS technique. RESULTS: At an ingested calcium load of 3.18 mmol, percentage of absorption for water averaged 22.53 +/- 2.53 (mean +/- SD) for men, 22.57 +/- 2.10 (mean +/- SD) for premenopausal women and 21.62 +/- 3.12 (mean +/- SD) for postmenopausal women. Percentage absorption from milk was 23.15 +/- 4.06 (mean +/- SD). DISCUSSION: The calcium from the mineral water is thus highly bioavailable, at least as bioavailable as milk calcium, and ICP-MS appears to represent a reliable and reproducible method for calcium absorption from alimentary sources.

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    Default Re: calcium in mineral water

    Journal of bone and mineral metabolism. [J Bone Miner Metab] 2003; Vol. 21 (1), pp. 28-33.

    For people in Western countries, the vegan diet has the advantage of low energy intake, but the calcium status of this strictly plant-based diet is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the calcium balance of individuals on a vegan diet in comparison with a lactovegetarian diet in a short-term investigation. Seven women and one man, ranging in age from 19 to 24 years, received during the first 10 days a vegan diet based on plant foods and calcium-rich mineral water and a lactovegetarian diet during the following 10 days. Portion size was adapted to the subjects' individual energy requirements. Calcium status was assessed by means of calcium intake in food and calcium output in feces and urine as measured by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In addition, deoxypyridinoline was measured in urine as a marker of bone resorption. The results show a significantly smaller daily calcium intake with an average of 843 +/- 140 mg in the vegan versus 1322 +/- 303 mg in the lactovegetarian diet. Apparent calcium absorption rates were calculated as 26% +/- 15% in the vegan and 24% +/- 8% in the lactovegetarian group (NS). The calcium balance was positive both in the vegan diet (119 +/- 113 mg/day) and in the lactovegetarian diet (211 +/- 136 mg/day) (NS). Deoxypyridinoline excretion showed no significant difference between the two diets (105 +/- 31 and 98 +/- 23 nmol/day). The present results indicate that calcium balance and a marker of bone turnover are not affected significantly when calcium is provided either solely by plant foods or by a diet including dairy products, despite the significantly different calcium intake levels in the diets. We conclude that a well-selected vegan diet maintains calcium status, at least for a short-term period.

  39. #39
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    Default Calcium in Juicing?

    I was wondering if anyone knows if juicing broccoli and kale (plant foods high in calcium) is a good source of calcium? I've been jucing them each day and taking them with flax oil and other juices, but I wonder if I am actually getting the calcium from them?

  40. #40
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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    I'm thinking that yes, you are.
    It's vegan, which means it's vegetarian which means there's nothing unheathy in it. -- my guy trying to explain vegan junkfood.

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    Default Calcium?

    anything that mentionz vitamn D or calcium phosphate , or any wordz next 2 calcium ... would it be something that has milk in it possibly?

  42. #42
    Seaside
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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    From "The Juice Lady's Guide to Juicing for Health" by Cherie Calbom:

    "Plants incorporate minerals, which occur in inorganic forms in the soil, into their tissues. As a part of this process, the minerals are combined with organic molecules into easily absorbable forms, which makes plant food an excellent dietary source of mineral. Juicing is believed to provide even better mineral absorption than whole fruits and vegetables because the process of juicing liberates minerals into a highly absorbable form."

    Best juice sources of calcium:
    kale
    parsley
    dandelion greens
    watercress
    beet greens
    broccoli
    spinach
    romaine lettuce
    string beans
    oranges
    celery
    carrots

  43. #43
    spo
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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    Hi, Kimberly;
    I juice all the time and always try to incorporate Kale into the juice for the high Calcium content. Seaside is right about juicing being a superior way to get nutrition from fruit and vegetable sources.
    spo

  44. #44
    I eve's Avatar
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    Default Re: Calcium?

    not necessarily, could be synthetic.
    Eve

  45. #45

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    Post Re: Calcium?

    I think sometimes calcium phosphate can be derived from ground up animal bone, so you do need to be careful. Having said that, it could also be derived from a mineral source. Vitamin D is created in the skin by sunlight - you shouldn't need to take it as a supplement unless you live mostly in the dark!

  46. #46

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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    Is liquidizing/blending better than juicing? I have a juice machine but I find it very wasteful, like you only get a small amount of juice for the amount of fruit/veggies you put in. I've started putting the stuff straight into my food processor instead and drinking all the pulp as well. If it's too thick I just add a bit water or fruit juice. It's really filling too as you can get a massive amount of fruit into a couple of pint glasses.

  47. #47
    Seaside
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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    I love smoothies! I think that there is a difference between juices and blended drinks, though. Although fiber is a necessary component for health, it can block absorption of nutrients to a certain degree, so for people who really need extra nutrition from fruits and vegetables, it is better to juice them, and save the pulp for something else, like thickening up soups.

  48. #48

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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    Although fiber is a necessary component for health, it can block absorption of nutrients to a certain degree
    Oh, I didn't know that - thanks. Perhaps it would be better to liquidize apples, oranges etc, but juice things like celery and so on. It's never straight forward is it?

  49. #49
    gertvegan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    When I was looking at getting a juicer/blender, I talked to Shazzie of Detox Your World who advised that fibre wouldn't be an issue in my vegan diet. So I opted for a juicer over the blender.

  50. #50
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    Default Re: Calcium in Juicing?

    That's what I figure--I'm getting way more than enough fibre as it is, and drinking a glass of spinach-apple juice is a lot easier than eating a bunch of spinach leaves and a couple apples!

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