Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 69

Thread: Environmental concerns

  1. #1
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Arrow Environmental concerns

    I wonder if this might be a suitable place to post environmental concerns? For example, in the IPS, Sonny Inbaraj reports on the threat that East Asia's rich biodiversity faces, with 95 percent of its forests already lost because of uncontrolled logging and wildlife being decimated at alarming rates, may well create what the World Bank calls 'silent forests', completely devoid of animals.

    In a report released ahead of next week's World Conservation Congress to be held in the Thai capital between Nov 17-25, the World Bank pointed out that the region's impressive economic growth has brought about environmental degradation at alarming rates. ''Economic growth in the East Asia-Pacific has increased demand for natural resources such as land for non-timber forest resources,'' as a result deforestation continues to accelerate the seemingly inexorable fragmentation and loss of terrestrial and aquatic habitats,'' it pointed out. (The report in full at http://ipsnews.net/new_nota.asp?idnews=26224 )
    Eve

  2. #2
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2208 - from E/environment magazine today.
    Eve

  3. #3
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    Seems that as people get older, they aren't scared of dying, but scared of getting Alzheimers. "Exploring the Aluminum/Alzheimer’s Link" is an article by by Melissa Knopper in the environment mag. http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2187
    Eve

  4. #4
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    Today's UK Independent reports that up to one million farmed salmon and sea trout escaped from their sea cages during the storms that ravaged Scotland last week, triggering fears that the country's remaining wild salmon stock could be wiped out.
    Environmentalists fighting to secure tougher legislation governing fish farms are worried that the mass escape will have a detrimental effect on the remaining numbers of wild salmon in Scotland's rivers.

    Opponents of fish farms estimate that up to 400,000 fish have escaped every year for the past five years but the force of last week's storms meant many more fish escaped at once.
    Eve

  5. #5
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    And this really is a concern: Professor Diamond, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, has spent many years studying the reasons why some societies in history thrived and others slipped into decline. He warned yesterday that an environmental collapse that would transform the world into a "global Somalia" could begin in 50 years if we fail to do anything about it. The article in full is at
    http://news.independent.co.uk/world/...p?story=603040
    Eve

  6. #6
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    Expanding urban sprawl is putting a third of America's endangered species at risk of extinction - says an article in the E/magazine this week. Read in full here: http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2216
    Eve

  7. #7
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default

    From The Independent

    Countdown to global catastrophe
    Climate change: report warns point of no return may be reached in 10 years, leading to droughts, agricultural failure and water shortages
    By Michael McCarthy, Environment Editor
    24 January 2005


    The global warming danger threshold for the world is clearly marked for the first time in an international report to be published tomorrow - and the bad news is, the world has nearly reached it already.

    The countdown to climate-change catastrophe is spelt out by a task force of senior politicians, business leaders and academics from around the world - and it is remarkably brief. In as little as 10 years, or even less, their report indicates, the point of no return with global warming may have been reached.

    The report, Meeting The Climate Challenge, is aimed at policymakers in every country, from national leaders down. It has been timed to coincide with Tony Blair's promised efforts to advance climate change policy in 2005 as chairman of both the G8 group of rich countries and the European Union.

    And it breaks new ground by putting a figure - for the first time in such a high-level document - on the danger point of global warming, that is, the temperature rise beyond which the world would be irretrievably committed to disastrous changes. These could include widespread agricultural failure, water shortages and major droughts, increased disease, sea-level rise and the death of forests - with the added possibility of abrupt catastrophic events such as "runaway" global warming, the melting of the Greenland ice sheet, or the switching-off of the Gulf Stream.

    The report says this point will be two degrees centigrade above the average world temperature prevailing in 1750 before the industrial revolution, when human activities - mainly the production of waste gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), which retain the sun's heat in the atmosphere - first started to affect the climate. But it points out that global average temperature has already risen by 0.8 degrees since then, with more rises already in the pipeline - so the world has little more than a single degree of temperature latitude before the crucial point is reached.

    More ominously still, it assesses the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere after which the two-degree rise will become inevitable, and says it will be 400 parts per million by volume (ppm) of CO2.

    The current level is 379ppm, and rising by more than 2ppm annually - so it is likely that the vital 400ppm threshold will be crossed in just 10 years' time, or even less (although the two-degree temperature rise might take longer to come into effect).

    "There is an ecological timebomb ticking away," said Stephen Byers, the former transport secretary, who co-chaired the task force that produced the report with the US Republican senator Olympia Snowe. It was assembled by the Institute for Public Policy Research in the UK, the Centre for American Progress in the US, and The Australia Institute.The group's chief scientific adviser is Dr Rakendra Pachauri, chairman of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

    The report urges all the G8 countries to agree to generate a quarter of their electricity from renewable sources by 2025, and to double their research spending on low-carbon energy technologies by 2010. It also calls on the G8 to form a climate group with leading developing nations such as India and China, which have big and growing CO2 emissions.

    "What this underscores is that it's what we invest in now and in the next 20 years that will deliver a stable climate, not what we do in the middle of the century or later," said Tom Burke, a former government adviser on green issues who now advises business.

    The report starkly spells out the likely consequences of exceeding the threshold. "Beyond the 2 degrees C level, the risks to human societies and ecosystems grow significantly," it says.

    "It is likely, for example, that average-temperature increases larger than this will entail substantial agricultural losses, greatly increased numbers of people at risk of water shortages, and widespread adverse health impacts. [They] could also imperil a very high proportion of the world's coral reefs and cause irreversible damage to important terrestrial ecosystems, including the Amazon rainforest."

    It goes on: "Above the 2 degrees level, the risks of abrupt, accelerated, or runaway climate change also increase. The possibilities include reaching climatic tipping points leading, for example, to the loss of the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets (which, between them, could raise sea level more than 10 metres over the space of a few centuries), the shutdown of the thermohaline ocean circulation (and, with it, the Gulf Stream), and the transformation of the planet's forests and soils from a net sink of carbon to a net source of carbon."

  8. #8
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    4,977

    Default

    I recently aquired a new digital camera and I found this article, regarding digital cameras and the environment, to be very interesting.

  9. #9
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default

    Emissions policy in disarray as Brussels rejects Blair's 'bungle'
    By Geoffrey Lean, Environment Correspondent

    13 February 2005

    Britain's plans for combating global warming have been rejected by the European Commission for being too lenient to industry, throwing them into disarray.

    The rejection - which comes just days before the Kyoto Protocol, tackling climate change, comes into force on Wednesday - is a personal humiliation for the Prime Minister, who insisted on watering down the plans in response to industry pressure.

    It further undermines his credibility as he seeks to use Britain's presidency of the European Union and the G8 group of wealthy countries to push the issue up the international agenda this year.

    The Secretary of State for the Environment, Margaret Beckett, will tomorrow announce that the Government has no alternative but to accept the EC's rebuff, and will outline measures to try to keep Britain's programme on track.

    This is only the latest of a series of government climbdowns since Mr Blair announced his intention to lead the world in the fight against climate change. Late last year Labour had to admit that it was not on target to meet an election promise of reducing pollution by carbon dioxide - the main cause of global warming - by 20 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020.

    Britain will meet a less stringent target laid down under the Kyoto Protocol but only, to ministers' huge embarrassment, as a result of action taken by their Conservative predecessors; carbon dioxide emissions have actually increased since Labour took power.

    Yet 10 days ago leading experts from around the world, meeting - at Mr Blair's invitation - in Exeter, warned that global warming was proving to be more catastrophic than previously predicted, and that there was only a decade left in which to take effective action against it.

    The latest embarrassment arises from Britain's contribution to Europe's main instrument for tackling global warming, a so-called emissions-trading scheme.

    Under it, industries are given pollution allowances but are allowed to trade them. So firms that succeed in reducing their emissions below the limit can make money by selling part of their allowances to those that overshoot. The scheme offers a flexible, and fashionably free-market, way of cutting pollution, but crucially depends on tight limits on the allowances.

    Under the scheme, each EU country has to submit a national limit to the EC, and then share it out to individual industries and firms.

    Britain submitted its plan by the deadline of March last year, adding the proviso that it might revise it later. In July, having heard no more, the EC formally accepted it.

    However, industry, which had originally pressed for the scheme as the most business-friendly alternative, then put pressure on ministers to relax the limits. Patricia Hewitt's Department of Trade and Industry took up its cause, leading to a row with Mrs Beckett's Department for the Environment, which insisted on sticking with the original plan.

    Eventually Mr Blair personally resolved the row, deciding to increase the limits by 6.6 million tons of carbon dioxide. His decision caused a political and public outcry, with opposition spokesmen accusing him of hypocrisy.

    But the EC has now called his bluff. It told the IoS late last week that it had "no intention" of accepting Mr Blair's revised figures, adding: "Britain submitted its plan, and we are sticking to it."

    In a desperate attempt to save face, Mrs Beckett will tomorrow accept the EC's ruling, but will announce that Britain will not reduce the individual, more relaxed, limits for individual businesses under the revised plan.

    She believes that industry, despite its protestations, will not need to emit as much pollution as it says. But if it does, she will crack down on emissions later to ensure that the EC's ruling is observed.

    Last night Michael Jack MP, chairman of the parliamentary select committee shadowing Mrs Beckett's department, described the episode as a "bungle". And Peter Ainsworth MP, chairman of the powerful Environmental Audit Committee, added: "Mr Blair's habit of trying to please everybody all the time has landed him in a predictable mess.

    "It is time he translated his expressions of concern about climate change into action at home. Until he does, he cannot expect the rest of the world to listen to him."

  10. #10
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    I read at the beginning of an article, "The British ban the hunting of wild foxes, at the same time breeding 20 MILLION pheasants artificially every year to be shot ... the British pass laws, making cruelty to goldfish a criminal offence, while the loathsomeness of fish farming is added to the horrors of fatory farming."

    Quite a paradox.
    Eve

  11. #11
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    http://news.independent.co.uk/world/...p?story=611811 for the story on the £6bn pipeline that threatens endangered Western Pacific grey whale.
    Eve

  12. #12
    Kevster
    Guest

  13. #13
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default

    Air pollution takes six months off your life, international experts find
    By Geoffrey Lean, Environment Editor
    20 February 2005


    Air pollution is shortening the lives of Britons by more than six months, a startling unpublished European Commission report reveals.

    The draft report, which will be presented to EU experts tomorrow, shows that more than 32,000 people die from breathing contaminated air in Britain each year, far more than had been thought.

    This means that the toll from the pollution, much of which comes from cars, is more than nine times greater than the number of deaths from road accidents.

    Yesterday, Tim Yeo, the shadow environment minister, called the results a "jolt" and called on the Government to consider them "very urgently indeed". The report, which has been sent to governments, industries and pressure groups, is the first attempt to work out the toll of the pollution throughout Europe.

    In all, it concludes, about 310,000 Europeans die from air pollution each year. More than 90 per cent of the toll comes from tiny particulates that cause heart failure. They are emitted by traffic (particularly diesel engines), industry and domestic heating. The other deaths are due to respiratory diseases caused by ozone, produced when sunlight reacts with pollutants emitted by vehicle exhausts.

    Across Europe, the report adds, life expectancy is reduced by 8.7 months as a result of breathing in pollution. Britain does better than most countries, with an average of 6.7 months of life lost.

    Germany has the most deaths, more than 65,000 a year, followed by Italy at 39,000, with France third and Britain fourth. Luxembourg, with its small population, has the least, at 282 a year, followed by Estonia, with 456.

    Lost life expectancy is worst in Belgium, where on average people lose 13.6 months of life, and the Netherlands, at 12.7 months. The Finns are the least affected, losing just 3.1 months on average, followed by the Irish at 3.9 months.

    Previous estimates - by a government committee - suggested that someone living in London would lose only three weeks of life as a result of breathing polluted air, while the highest previous estimate for the number of deaths stood at 24,000.

    Yesterday Mr Yeo said: "I think we have all been guilty of some complacency about air pollution, and these conclusions come as a jolt."

  14. #14
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default

    Mr Yeo says SOME complacency, what a joke, he clearly has no idea about the impacts of environmental pollution, that's probably why the Tories made him Environment Minister.

  15. #15
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    Today, there's an article beginning: "One of Britain's most eminent scientists has attacked President Bush for acting like a latter-day Nero who fiddles while the world burns because of global warming.

    To read in full, click on http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/env...p?story=617595
    Eve

  16. #16
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    I read that the battle over oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) has reached a fever pitch this week. The full article at http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2343
    Eve

  17. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    155

    Default

    I thought this site was interesting. It deals with the forthcoming energy crisis, the consequences for the human population size, for the economy, etc. It's basically a bunch of links to various articles. In particular, I thought that Revisiting Carrying Capacity: Area-Based Indicators of Sustainability (which deals with the ecological footprint issues) and The Olduvai Theory: Sliding Towards a Post-Industrial Stone Age were interesting, but there's much, much more to find, most of which I have not yet read.

  18. #18
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default

    Industry fury as Beckett [reluctantly] retreats over UK carbon allowances
    By Michael Harrison Business Editor and Stephen Castle in Brussels
    12 March 2005

    The government was forced into a humiliating climbdown yesterday over the amount of carbon British industry will be allowed to produce under new European Union emission trading rules.

    Full story:

    http://news.independent.co.uk/busine...p?story=619238

  19. #19
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    Good news on neem seeds, here: http://www.biotechimc.org/or/2005/03/4010.shtml
    Eve

  20. #20
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default

    The oil under this wilderness will last the US six months. But soon the drilling will begin

    Senate backs exploitation of Alaskan wildlife refuge

    John Vidal, environment editor
    Friday March 18, 2005
    The Guardian

    It is described as the last great American wilderness and has been the battle ground between America's most powerful oil interests and environmentalists for more than two decades. But yesterday the giants of the energy industry were celebrating a significant victory and looking forward to the chance to move into one of the most lucrative oil fields left in the US, following the Senate's narrow 51-49 decision to open up the pristine Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northern Alaska.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/oil/story/...440750,00.html

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    189

    Default

    Study highlights global decline

    The assessment found that human activities, particularly the spread of modern agriculture, have caused irreversible changes to the natural world.
    It cited as an example the over-use of water for farming, which puts pressure on fresh drinking supplies. Land that has been farmed too intensively is also becoming barren.

  22. #22
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Goldman Prize Honors Activists in Developing Nations - April 26, 2005. The San Francisco-based Goldman Environmental Foundation recently announced the six 2005 winners of its prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize. Here's the E/mag url with the article in full:
    http://www.emagazine.com/view/?2493
    Eve

  23. #23

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NSW, Australia
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Greenpeace Russia is asking for help from the international cyberactivist community. Why? The Russian Government has given permission to build what will be the world's longest pipeline, running 4,188km (2,602 miles) from central Siberia to the Russian Far East and the Sea of Japan. The pipeline's end point, the oil terminal, will be built in Southwest Primorye that is a home to over a quarter of Russia's endangered species, including the Amur (Siberian) tiger and the 30 last remaining Amur leopards.

    The terminal will also threaten the Far East Marine Biosphere Reserve - Russia's only marine reserve with the status of UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

    (From Greenpeace)

  24. #24
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Getting back to environmental concerns - a leak of highly radioactive nuclear fuel dissolved in concentrated nitric acid, enough to half fill an Olympic-size swimming pool, has forced the closure of Sellafield's Thorp reprocessing plant. This from today's UK Guardian. Full article at http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/st...479483,00.html
    Eve

  25. #25
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Save the planet? That's so cool... says the Independent: The rest here:
    http://news.independent.co.uk/world/...p?story=637028
    Eve

  26. #26
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    ETC report that in a breathtaking display of political interference, the Canadian govt has blocked entry of Africa's chief negotiator for the Cartagena (biosafety) Protocol. He was scheduled to attend UN meetings beginning next week in Montreal. The Protocol is the UN treaty that governs the international movement of genetically modified (GM) organisms.

    Dr Tewolde Berhan Gebre Egziabher, the Ethiopian government's chief scientist and its representative to the Montreal-based UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) had his passport returned without the requested Canadian visa yesterday, without explanation.

    The renowned scientist submitted his passport to the Canadian embassy on May 5 and had planned to fly to Oslo, Norway for inter-regional negotiations prior to attending the Montreal meetings that begin on May 25. Because his passport was returned only May 17, Dr Tewolde was forced to miss the Oslo meeting.

    Since the Rio Earth Summit of 1992, Dr Tewolde has been one of the most well known leaders among African diplomats addressing environmental issues.
    But during the negotiations on a UN treaty on crop genetic resources adopted in Rome last year, Dr Tewolde spoke on behalf of all developing countries in demanding the right of farmers to save and exchange seeds and in opposing "life patenting" (intellectual property over biological products and processes). In negotiations that led to the Cartagena Protocol, the Ethiopian clashed with his Canadian counterparts, demanding higher standards to prevent GM contamination. At UN meetings in Montreal and around the world, Dr Tewolde has spoken passionately against Terminator technology (gm seed rendered sterile at harvest time, forcing farmers to buy new seeds each growing season).

    The Ethiopian scientist had made it known that he would be coming to
    Montreal next week to press for the labeling of gm seeds and food products and for companies and governments to accept liability when their seeds lead to GM contamination. Canada has so far failed to ratify the UN biosafety protocol and is known to be opposed to compulsory GM labeling and liability.

    "Dr Tewolde is one of the most respected scientists in his field," said Pat Mooney, Executive Director of ETC Group in Ottawa, "If the Canadian govt can't make sure Dr Tewolde has his visa for the opening of the meetings, Canada does not deserve to host the Convention on Biological Diversity." ETC Group is a Canadian-based international civil society organization with observer status in the UN.

    Dr Tewolde is the recipient of a number of awards and honors for his work in defending biodiversity and the environment. In particular, he received the Right Livelihood Award (also known as the Alternative Nobel Prize).

    For further information:

    Eric Darier, Campaigner, Greenpeace, Montreal (514) 933-0021 x 15; mobile (514) 605-6497
    Pat Mooney, Exec Director, ETC Group (613) 241-2267; mobile (613) 2610688
    Lucy Sharratt, Coordinator, Ban Terminator Campaign, (613) 241 2267
    ______________________________________________
    ETC Group mailing list
    http://lists.etcgroup.org/mailman/listinfo/etcgroup
    Eve

  27. #27
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Brazil arrests civil servants in crackdown on Amazon logging trade
    By David Usborne in New York

    04 June 2005

    The authorities in Brazil were hailing their latest attempt to bring an end to illegal logging of the Amazon rain forest after police arrested 89 people, of whom nearly half were civil servants in the government agency specifically charged with protecting it.

    http://news.independent.co.uk/world/...p?story=643946

  28. #28
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns


  29. #29
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    I'll post a link to a study once I have the okay from the researcher but I read yesterday that the tremendous increase of multiple births in western countries but not be soley due to the increase in use of IVF (in-vitro fertilization). It appears that bovine growth hormones, which is given to cows to increase milk production, effects a particular hormone in humans that is an indicator in the likelihood of conceiving multiples.

  30. #30
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    'US gives way on carbon pollution

    Gaby Hinsliff, Ned Temko, Mark Townsend
    Sunday July 3, 2005
    The Observer

    A historic deal on climate change which would see the US sign up to cut greenhouse gas emissions was last night emerging after a day of frantic negotiations ahead of the G8 summit.
    The draft text hammered out by officials meeting in London is expected to pledge the world's richest countries to wean themselves off fossil fuels - not just to save the planet, but to prevent a worldwide energy crisis.'

    http://observer.guardian.co.uk/polit...520204,00.html

  31. #31
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Extract from the latest Vegano newsletter:
    “If you follow corn back to the fields where it grows, you will find an 80 million acre monoculture that consumes more chemical herbicide and fertilizer than any other crop. Keep going and you can trace the nitrogen runoff from that crop all the way down the Mississippi into the Gulf of Mexico, where it has created (if that is the right word) a 12,000 square mile ‘dead-zone.’ But you can go farther still, and follow the fertilizer needed to grow that corn all the way to the oil fields of the Persian Gulf…Assuming [a steer] continues to eat 25 pounds of corn a day and reaches a weight of 1,259 pounds, he will have consumed in his lifetime roughly 284 gallons of oil. We have succeeded in industrializing the beef calf, transforming what was once a solar-powered ruminant into the very last thing we need: another fossil-fuel machine.”
    (New York Times Magazine “Power Steer” by Michael Pollan, 31/3/2002)
    Dedicated to Helping You Avoid Animal Ingredients

    More specific tips and techniques about Veggie Living are included on my Veggie 'Free Info' Page - available at: http://www.vegano.com.au/vegan_free_info.php
    Rebecca
    Eve

  32. #32
    Cryospark
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Awesome findings
    On the radio a personality which I can't pull into mind right now said
    The particles sent into the atmosphere that cause global warming at the same time have a blanketing effect, in a sense balancing out the warming effect but slowing becoming worse.

    You seen when the particles take control the poisons will be all that we breathe, the warmth is not the least of our troubles. We are looking at becoming venus.

  33. #33
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Britain, France and Germany called today's meeting of the board of governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna and warned Iran if it resumed nuclear-related activities it would breach an agreement to suspend activities during negotiations with the EU, and risk referral to the Security Council.

    But an analyst with the independent nuclear think-tank Basic (British American Security Information Council) said the European strategy was flawed and risked being counter-productive. Although US pressure at today's meeting could lead to Iran being referred to the Security Council, a Basic analyst, Paul Ingram, said that China, which holds a veto, was unlikely to back sanctions against Iran, which has become a major trading partner.

    "It's a non-credible threat. Such policies are inherently dangerous because they invite people to call your bluff," Mr Ingram said.

    Iran has also taken care to keep the IAEA on board, by reopening the Isfahan site in the presence of UN inspectors. The Iranians, who have the sympathy of other non-nuclear states on the 35-nation IAEA board, insist they have the right to the peaceful use of nuclear energy.
    Eve

  34. #34
    cross barer
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    661

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Scientist finds use for waste plastic

    Just watching the ABC catalyst prgram and saw this story. The scientist has learned that coke, one of the materials used to harden steel during the fabrication process; can be replaced by plastic from drink bottles etc. This supplies carbon to the process instead of using coke, which is a mineral (think it's related to coal?) and means less damage to the environemnt through mining as well as using up what would end up as landfill.

    Thumbs up!!!

  35. #35
    __ __ __ __
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Portland, OR.
    Posts
    37

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    That Aluminum/Alzhiemer's link made me think of all of the articles I have read about Mercury poisoning and Alzhiemer's, and one alittle more recent involving Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease(human form of Mad Cow disease):
    http://www.organicconsumers.org/madc...erCJDkills.cfm


    "The most frequent misdiagnosis of CJD among the elderly is Alzheimer's disease.[55] Neither CJD nor Alzheimer's can be conclusively diagnosed without a brain biopsy,[56] and the symptoms and pathology of both diseases overlap. There can be spongy changes in Alzheimer's, for example, and senile Alzheimer's plaques in CJD.[57] Stanley Prusiner, the scientist who won the Nobel Prize for his discovery of prions, speculates that Alzheimer's may even turn out to be a prion disease as well.[58] In younger victims, CJD is more often misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis or as a severe viral infection.[59]"

  36. #36
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    The US Fish & Wildlife Service announced last week that it is cutting the amount of land set aside for California’s threatened tiger salamander by nearly half, citing as unacceptable the expense of keeping the 184,000 acres in question off limits to development. The disputed land--which has been designated as critical habitat for the eight-inch-long yellow and black amphibian--is in some of the country’s fastest growing areas in California’s Central Valley, as well as east of San Francisco.

    This latest decision by the federal government does not surprise environmentalists, who are bracing for an all-out assault on laws protecting endangered species. Congressional Republicans, White House insiders and conservative federal judges have all expressed interest in gutting the 30-year-old US Endangered Species Act because they say it protects unimportant species at the expense of economic development.
    Eve

  37. #37
    Kiran's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    692

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Talking of environment, I remember something that George W said. Pretty funny. I have also posted this in the jokes thread

    "It isn't pollution that's harming the environment. It's the impurities in our air and water that are doing it."
    ...Governor George W. Bush
    Life is like a boomerang: What goes around comes around - "Karma"rocks!

  38. #38
    cross barer
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    661

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Alternative fuel made from recycled materials:

    I heard on the radio this morning some guy in Germany invented a fuel from dead cats. Apparantly this is unture, this story from cnn.com :

    BERLIN, Germany (Reuters) -- A German inventor said he has developed a method to produce crude oil products from waste that he believes can be an answer to the soaring costs of fuel, but denied a German newspaper story implying he also used dead cats.

    Christian Koch, an inventor and patent holder of the "KDV 500" that he said produces high quality fuel, said he can transform waste products such as paper, rubbish and plastic materials into fuel.

    But Koch, 55, said there was no truth to stories published in Bild newspaper on Tuesday and Wednesday that suggested he used dead cats as part of the mix for his organic diesel fuel.

    "I use paper, plastics, textiles and rubbish," Koch told Reuters.

    "It's an alternative fuel that is friendly for the environment. But it's complete nonsense to suggest dead cats. I've never used cats and would never think of that. At most the odd toad may have jumped in."

    Bild on Tuesday wrote a headline: "German inventor can turn cats into fuel -- for a tank he needs 20 cats." The paper on Wednesday followed up with a story entitled: "Can you really make fuel out of cats?"

    A spokesman for Bild told Reuters the story was meant to show that cat remains could "in theory" be used to make fuel with Koch's patented method.

    The author of the story said Koch had never told him directly that he had used dead cats as the story implied.

    The Web site of Koch's firm, "Alphakat GmbH", says his patented "KDV 500" machine can produce what he calls the "bio-diesel" fuel at about 23 euro cents (30 cents) a liter, which is about one-fifth the price at petrol stations now.

    "I drive my normal diesel-powered car with this mixture," Koch is quoted saying in Bild, next to a large picture of a kitten. "I have gone 170,000 km (106,000 miles) without a problem."

  39. #39

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    hmmm I hate to think of poor dead kitties but helping the environment is always good.
    I know we keep talking about it, but here in the states I want so badly for my parents (who are conservative) to agree w/ me. Honestly, I lay awake at night thinking, if this were to happen in Vermont (predominantly white) people would not be dead lying on the streets. UGH I hate our gov. sometimes. I watched some coverage on it the other day (I usually avoid the news b/c it saddens me) and I spent an hr crying in my bed about it. I just want to help those people. I want someone in a high position to stand up and say, this is NOT OK. Sure, GW is saying that now, but I feel as though something could have been done
    Be thankful for this moment, this moment is your life:)

  40. #40
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,716

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    i just watched on the news a bunch of scientists stating that they do believe its global warming that is causing such horrific hurricanes now and that they ARE getting worse because of it. why can humans just come together and stop the green house gas emmisions and make this planet healthy? its falling apart. doesnt anyone see that? mother nature is getting back at humans for ruining her precious planet. stupid humans! and im sick and tired of hearing all the high up people who actually hold weight in what they say with what will happen, that they dont think we are hurting our environment.
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  41. #41
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Bingos: The current issue of New Internationalist (NI), focuses on the Bingos (Big International Non-Govt Organisations) (and in the US 'non-profits'). NI points out that more money is donated to NGOs than ever before, and humanitarian or environment issues are identified in the public mind more with the Bingos than with govt programs.

    The world’s worst natural disaster, the tsunami, prompted 80% of Britain’s population to donate, and similarly world-wide. These bingos have become powerful institutions, with revenues running into hundreds of millions, even billions. They employ thousands of staff, and their CEOs receive commensurate remuneration. Harold Decker, President of the American Red Cross took severance pay of over a million dollars. The CEO of the Wildlife Conservation Soc gets an annual salary of over half a million dollars. The number of bingos with UN representation has trebled since 1992, and the proportion of donations that went to the biggest charities rose to 45%, while some smaller NGOs face extinction. In Australia, World Vision accounted for over 40% of all funds raised. The WWF has enormous influence of its own.

    As these organisations qualify as charities, and receive govt assistance, there is some significant change to their style. Eg, Oxfam, Britain’s biggest development bingo, tried to align the ‘Make Poverty History’ campaign with Tony Blair’s New Labour Govt. The NI article contends that having more money, does not mean it is a bingo that is better for the people or the cause it claims to serve. There are tax gains, investments, etc. NI points out that some bingos, such as Amnesty International does not have charitable status, and is arguably healthier without it.

    There are several articles on the bingos in the current NI issue; interesting stuff.
    Eve

  42. #42
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    More good news.

    'Man will 'wipe out' rare creatures of the deep
    By Severin Carrell
    Published: 16 October 2005

    The deep ocean is one of the world's last great wildernesses. But not for long. Two kilometres below the surface, scores of rare and exotic species are being wiped out at a dramatic rate.

    These unique species include the goblin shark which boasts a unicorn-like horn, prickly sharks with humped backs and glowing eyes, vast single-celled organisms as large as footballs and tripod fish that stand on their fins.

    In a letter passed to The Independent on Sunday, Britain's leading marine scientists have warned these species face extinction because of the global growth in deep-sea trawlers fishing for edible species such as the orange roughy, hoki and round-nosed grenadier.'

    http://news.independent.co.uk/world/...icle319997.ece

  43. #43
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Vancouver, Canada
    Posts
    4,977

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    I came accross this..........just in time for Halloween. It's kinda cheezy but it makes a point The Climate Mash

  44. #44
    cross barer
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    661

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Denmark fisheries authority demands the immediate end to fishing in order to protect endangered species.

    From Nature online:

    Researchers from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, based in Copenhagen, are advising that fishing activities in many regions of the world's oceans be reduced to zero for the sake of endangered fish. These creatures include many food species, such as the orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus) and roundnose grenadier (Coryphaenoides rupestris), but also deepwater sharks that are often snared as by-catch, such as the Portuguese dogfish (Centroscymnus coelolepis).


    "The only way to do it is to reset the watch," argues Poul Degnbol, chairman of the council's advisory committee on fishery management. "We have to start from a low level and monitor closely. We can only expand when we know what we're doing."

    Working out how many fish we can take without causing a population crash is a priority for fisheries researchers, adds Holm. And until we have that knowledge, fishing has to be cut back to more modest levels, he argues.

    "We're kidding ourselves if we think we will ever have a perfect knowledge," he says. "But we're balancing on the edge of the cliff, and it would be much wiser for us just to take a few steps back."

  45. #45
    rantipole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    asbury park nj
    Posts
    449

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    We've had a few thousand years of our spiritual leaders telling us that humanity is the pinnacle of creation and the world is here just for us. That lead us to develop technology that divorced us from our relationship to nature and further exacerbated our over-inflated sense of importance.

    It's pretty easy to selfishly consume everything around you when you believe it was put there for you in the first place.

    Cheers,
    rant

  46. #46
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    An 80-kilometre-long slick of heavily contaminated water has surged down a river into Harbin, one of China's biggest cities, leaving 4 million people without public water services. The slick of the carcinogen, benzene, hit the capital of China's north-eastern Heilongjiang province, in the early hours this morning. The Songhua River was contaminated by a petrochemical plant explosion in neighbouring Jilin province, 380 kilometres upriver from Harbin.

    The provincial government only acknowledged the environmental disaster yesterday, following days of rumour mongering that led to panic buying and hoarding of water and food supplies in Harbin. People have crowded the airport and railway stations to leave the area.

    China's Xinhua news agency reports the provincial government has told Harbin residents to stay away from the river to avoid possible exposure to airborne contaminants coming off the water. Benzene is an industrial solvent and petrol component, that can cause leukaemia.

    Harbin resident Zhou Qicai says there is growing resentment toward provincial neighbour Jilin over the crisis. "A lot of people here blame Jilin for not acting sooner after the explosion," the resident said. "There were at least several days between the explosion and when they issued any warnings for downstream."

    Russia's environmental protection agency has also said it is concerned the pollution could affect drinking water supplies in its Khabarovsk region, which the Songhua River enters several hundred kilometres downstream from Harbin.
    (AFP/Reuters)
    Eve

  47. #47
    cross barer
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    661

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Money for rainforests bid put to UN
    November 29, 2005

    THE world's 10 rainforest nations, including Papua New Guinea, are asking the United Nations to consider expanding the carbon trading market to reward forest conservation.

    "In the rural areas of my nation, where 80 per cent of the people live, the only real options for economic growth often require the destruction of natural forests in order to trade low-value commodities with the industrial powers. I call this eco-colonialism," PNG Prime Minister Sir Michael Somare said last week.

    "The impacts of global warming are many and serious: sea-level rise … changes in availability of fresh water … and the increasing incidence of extreme events — floods, droughts, and hurricanes — the serious consequences of which are rising to levels which invite comparison with weapons of mass destruction," Lord May (president of Britain's Royal Society) said in an advance copy of the speech he will deliver to the convention (UN's Framework Convention on Climate Change, Montreal).

    "The estimated damage inflicted by (hurricane) Katrina is equivalent to 1.7 per cent of US GDP this year, and it is conceivable that the Gulf Coast of the US could be effectively uninhabitable by the end of the century."

    Using existing carbon trading prices, some economists have estimated that the rainforest nations stand to gain billions of dollars if they are allowed into the pollution credit market.

    The US, the largest emitter of greenhouse gases, rejected (Kyoto), while all other major developed nations except Australia signed it. The protocol, which took effect on January 16, lets countries cutting emissions sell "pollution credits" to countries that do not cut them enough. There is no such incentive for rainforests.

    http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/...026404005.html

  48. #48
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    'California Cows Fail Latest Emissions Test
    James Owen
    for National Geographic News
    August 16, 2005

    Standing around chewing the cud, cows don't look especially threatening. But dairy herds in California are the latest livestock to be branded an environmental health risk on account of their flatulent behavior. '

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...pollution.html

  49. #49
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns

    Just words but quite funny....

    'US retreats at climate change talks

    'Obstructive' White House stung by criticism of its stance as 157 nations extend the Kyoto agreement

    David Adam in Montreal
    Sunday December 11, 2005
    The Observer

    The White House was forced into a U-turn on climate change yesterday after appearing to misjudge critically the international and domestic mood on its efforts to tackle global warming.'

    http://observer.guardian.co.uk/inter...664657,00.html

  50. #50
    Kevster
    Guest

    Default Re: Environmental concerns


Similar Threads

  1. Soy/Soya milk concerns
    By ems.w in forum VEGAN FOOD
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: May 12th, 2011, 05:30 PM
  2. Soya causes environmental damage
    By just_a_grrrl in forum VEGAN FOOD
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: Apr 21st, 2008, 06:21 PM
  3. Environmental Engineering
    By Soul Rebel in forum Human evolution and environmental issues
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Nov 18th, 2006, 02:50 PM
  4. Redwood Asthma UK concerns resolved
    By Nadine in forum Projects, companies & links
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Jun 2nd, 2006, 10:10 PM

Tags for this thread (If you see one or more tags below, click on them if you're looking for similar threads!)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •