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Benefits of living on a vegan diet? - Page 2
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Thread: Benefits of living on a vegan diet?

  1. #51
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Study: Vegan diets healthier for planet, people than meat diets

    3774 calories per day!! When you think about it, if you're eating a take-out meal such as McDonalds or similar, each day, then it's probably not hard to achieve 3774 cals per day.

    Thanks for posting that Yoggy! There's some interesting info in there like this:


    While methane and nitrous oxide are relatively rare compared with carbon dioxide, they are — molecule for molecule — far more powerful greenhouse gases than carbon dioxide. A single pound of methane, for example, has the same greenhouse effect as approximately 50 pounds of carbon dioxide.
    A single pound of methane, for example, has the same greenhouse effect as approximately 50 pounds of carbon dioxide.

    This is devestating.

  2. #52
    PainterLady
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    Default Re: Study: Vegan diets healthier for planet, people than meat diets

    Wow! Great article!

  3. #53
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is a vegan diet more healthy? Evidence please.

    There's actually a lot of articles documenting effects of eating meat and dairy products - and also a number of studies comparing vegans with others. I think we'll see more and more of these since more and more people go vegan.

    Here's a one I just came across:
    Study Finds Vegan Diet Reverses Diabetes Symptoms
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  4. #54

    Default Re: Is a vegan diet more healthy? Evidence please.

    i agree with pilaf. "the china study" is really good, and the guy who's written it, can back up all of his claims.

  5. #55
    Soul Rebel
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    Default Re: Is a vegan diet more healthy? Evidence please.

    Have your friend read The China Study, Diet for a New America and The Food Revolution.

  6. #56
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    Default What are the health benefits to being a vegan?

    Hello.
    I am very new to veganism, to show an example of this I will share with you that I decided to become one yesterday. I was reading the post/replys on this website and looked at other information, this helped me greatly to see that I wanted and should become vegan.
    But thats off topic.
    Anyway I was talking to my mother earlier today, and told her of my new found diet. She was as supportive of it but expressed concern
    about my portein and iron needs. She also was wondering if it made your weight fluctucate or decrease. I asumed it would decrease...please correct me if I am wrong.
    She also asked me what real health benefits there were with being vegan.
    I did not know how to reply to this.
    If you know of any could you please tell me, to help her and myself understand more about it?

  7. #57
    frank language's Avatar
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    Default Re: What are the health benefits to being a vegan?

    Well, first: your weight is likely to decrease, but it still depends on what you eat and how efficiently your burn the calories. The things you eat are likely to be more digestible; I find after a big meal, I can expect to feel "normal" again a lot sooner than when I used to eat meat and animal products.

    There are polls here about whether people feel they have more energy since adopting a vegan diet--I do. Since most people eat too much protein, it really isn't hard to get enough protein from vegetable sources. As for iron, I take an iron supplement; some people need to, some people don't.

    Welcome and good luck!

  8. #58
    Good sperm
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    Default Re: What are the health benefits to being a vegan?

    By avoiding dairy, eggs and meat and eating a healthy vegan diet you will be reducing your risk of heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes, stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Parkinsons, Alzheimers and obesity.
    If you eat plenty of fruit and veg and don't eat junk food you'll get plenty of iron, calcium and vitamins. I was pretty health conscious as a veggie but since going vegan I have felt so much healthier.
    Have a look here for some more info on diet, and read John Robbins 'The Food Revolution' and Dr Campbell's 'The China Study' for some more in-depth discussion of the health risks of an omni diet not to mention the cruelty and ecological devastation involved.

  9. #59
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    Default Re: What are the health benefits to being a vegan?

    I never worry about iron, and I always seem to get enough. I know this because I've had the levels checked. (They always check it for you when you donate blood too.) If you're really worried and want to make sure you're eating high iron foods, eat things with sesame seeds, like tahini. Very high in iron. There are other threads on here about foods high in iron.

    But the main health benefits of a vegan diet are reduced risk of heart disease and reduced risk of various cancers. General increased immune system due to all the plant foods. Also, lower cholesterol levels!

    And then you are also free of all the dangers that come with eating animal products... food borne illnesses like salmonella, mad cow, undercooked foods, tapeworms.
    I eat nutritional yeast by the spoonful.

  10. #60
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    Default Re: What are the health benefits to being a vegan?

    Hopefully you are feeling excellent having read the previous posts!
    I have also noticed that my skin and hair are really healthy since becoming vegan.

  11. #61
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    Default Re: What are the health benefits to being a vegan?

    What they said - you are consuming a diet with no cholesterol just great food (as long as you avoid junk like crisps).

    People are totally obsessed with protein - why I do not know, it's not like we are all entering olympic weight lifting. I just can't understand this protein obsession, I am more concerned about trace minerals, iron and vitamin C than protein!!!!!!! Most of which are severly lacking in the omni diet!
    Pulses amongst other things will give you all the protein you need.

    I find my nutrient chart invaluable and make sure I eat something out of each vegan food group each day - it is on the wall in my kitchen:

    http://www.lizcookcharts.co.uk/nutri...479e4217ee1480
    Silent but deadly :p

  12. #62
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    Default Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    Another beneficial statement for fruit and vegetables.

    I've also read recently that male instances of breast cancer - are increasing.

    It would be nice to see some research work done in this area.


    Vegetables and Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    Two new reports from the Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) study show that diets including at least five fruit and vegetable servings a day reduce mortality by nearly 50 percent in women previously diagnosed with breast cancer.

    A June report in the Journal of Clinical Oncology showed that women who followed the five-a-day recommendation and remained physically active had a nearly 50 percent reduction in mortality risk during the seven-year study period (1). A report in the July 18, 2007 edition of Journal of the American Medical Association shows that recommendations for even greater fruit and vegetable intake did not extend benefits beyond those achieved by the five-a-day group (2). The WHEL study included more than 3,000 women.

    Prior reports from the WHEL study have shown that diet changes alter the hormones that influence cancer growth. In a substudy of 291 participants, increases in fiber and reductions in dietary fat were associated with reduced serum concentrations of estradiol, bioavailable estradiol, estrone, and estrone sulfate (3).

    Previous studies have shown that low-fat, high-fiber diets improve cancer survival. The Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WINS) study showed that reducing dietary fat and boosting fiber cut the risk of cancer recurrence by 24 percent (4).


    1. Pierce JP, Stefanick ML, Flatt SW, et al. Greater survival after breast cancer in physically active women with high vegetable-fruit intake regardless of obesity. J Clin Oncol 2007;25:2345-51.

    2. Pierce JP, Natarajan L, Caan BJ, et al. Influence of a diet very high in vegetables, fruit, and fiber and low in fat on prognosis following treatment for breast cancer: The Women’s Healthy Eating and Living (WHEL) randomized trial. JAMA 2007;298:289-98.

    3. Rock CL, Flatt SW, Thomson CA, et al. Effects of a high-fiber, low-fat diet intervention on serum concentrations of reproductive steroid hormones in women with a history of breast cancer. J Clin Oncol 2004;12:2379-2387.

    4. Chlebowski RT, Blackburn GL, Thomson CA, et al. Dietary fat reduction and breast cancer outcome: interim efficacy results from the Women's Intervention Nutrition Study. J Natl Cancer Inst 2006;98:1767-76.
    For information about nutrition and health, please visit www.pcrm.org/.

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    I Think, Therefore I Am A Vegan

  13. #63
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    Default Re: Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    thanks frank! i know someone who is very sick with breast cancer right now. its very sad.
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  14. #64
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    Default Re: Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    me also.

    shes been fighting for years and years...

    i offered her the china study and she gave it back one day later and said she didnt want to read it...

    so ive stopped trying to help. i give her support, but i guess she thinks that it couldnt possibly be her diet that is giving her recurring breastcancer....
    the aim of life is to live, and to live means to be aware, joyously, dunkenly, serenely, divinely aware.
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  15. #65
    BlackCats
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    Default Re: Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    Thanks Frank for the info - I thought I read that male instances of breast cancer were increasing because guys were gaining weight and developing breast tissue like a woman?

    I used to work for a hospice charity and I heard the view expressed often that if people are ill they should be able to do what gives them pleasure eg: smoke, eat junk food, drink alcohol (which I can sympathise with)

    Its strange though that a diet rich in fruits and veggies can be seen as a deprivation/ punishment?

  16. #66
    cobweb
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    Default Re: Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    I heard on the (radio) news a couple of days ago that there's been a 'disapppointing' new study to show that a high intake of fruit and veg doesn't make any difference to Cancer sufferers! .

  17. #67
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    Default Re: Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    Quote Aphrodite View Post
    Its strange though that a diet rich in fruits and veggies can be seen as a deprivation/ punishment?
    Yes that's very bizarre, we feel deprived if we run out of those things!!!
    Silent but deadly :p

  18. #68
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    Default Re: Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    Bit of commentary here which explains the report cobweb read.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/healt...77699720070717

    Some well dodgy research methodology in there, plus some misreporting I'd say.

  19. #69
    cobweb
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    Default Re: Vegetables & Fruits Double Breast Cancer Survival Rates

    thanks, Harpy, will have a read.

  20. #70
    nonegiven
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    Default Scientific health studies including vegans

    In response to a question in the topic about Veganism and mental health, I thought I would dig out some serious scientific studies including veganism.

    May be there is some place or way to get the originals and upload them to the forum/site?
    Health effects of vegetarian and vegan diets

    Key TJ, Appleby PN, Rosell MS. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2006; 65(1):35-41.

    Vegetarian diets do not contain meat, poultry or fish; vegan diets further exclude dairy products and eggs. Vegetarian and vegan diets can vary widely, but the empirical evidence largely relates to the nutritional content and health effects of the average diet of well-educated vegetarians living in Western countries, together with some information on vegetarians in non-Western countries.

    In general, vegetarian diets provide relatively large amounts of cereals, pulses, nuts, fruits and vegetables. In terms of nutrients, vegetarian diets are usually rich in carbohydrates, n-6 fatty acids, dietary fibre, carotenoids, folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin E and Mg, and relatively low in protein, saturated fat, long-chain n-3 fatty acids, retinol, vitamin B(12) and Zn; vegans may have particularly low intakes of vitamin B(12) and low intakes of Ca. Cross-sectional studies of vegetarians and vegans have shown that on average they have a relatively low BMI and a low plasma cholesterol concentration; recent studies have also shown higher plasma homocysteine concentrations than in non-vegetarians.

    Cohort studies of vegetarians have shown a moderate reduction in mortality from IHD but little difference in other major causes of death or all-cause mortality in comparison with health-conscious non-vegetarians from the same population. Studies of cancer have not shown clear differences in cancer rates between vegetarians and non-vegetarians. More data are needed, particularly on the health of vegans and on the possible impacts on health of low intakes of long-chain n-3 fatty acids and vitamin B(12). Overall, the data suggest that the health of Western vegetarians is good and similar to that of comparable non-vegetarians
    Last edited by Korn; Nov 27th, 2011 at 11:50 PM. Reason: This was the first post in a similar thread

  21. #71
    nonegiven
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    Default Re: Scientific health studies including vegans

    Fracture risk in vegetarians and nonvegetarians

    Appleby P, Roddam A, Allen N, Key T. Comparative fracture risk in vegetarians and nonvegetarians in EPIC-Oxford. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2007; 61(12):1400-1406.

    Objective: To compare fracture rates in four diet groups (meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans) in the Oxford cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Oxford).

    Design: Prospective cohort study of self-reported fracture risk at follow-up.

    Setting: The United Kingdom.

    Subjects: A total of 7947 men and 26 749 women aged 20-89 years, including 19 249 meat eaters, 4901 fish eaters, 9420 vegetarians and 1126 vegans, recruited by postal methods and through general practice surgeries.

    Methods: Cox regression.

    Results: Over an average of 5.2 years of follow-up, 343 men and 1555 women reported one or more fractures. Compared with meat eaters, fracture incidence rate ratios in men and women combined adjusted for sex, age and non-dietary factors were 1.01 (95% CI 0.88-1.17) for fish eaters, 1.00 (0.89-1.13) for vegetarians and 1.30 (1.02-1.66) for vegans. After further adjustment for dietary energy and calcium intake the incidence rate ratio among vegans compared with meat eaters was 1.15 (0.89-1.49). Among subjects consuming at least 525 mg/day calcium the corresponding incidence rate ratios were 1.05 (0.90-1.21) for fish eaters, 1.02 (0.90-1.15) for vegetarians and 1.00 (0.69-1.44) for vegans.

    Conclusions: In this population, fracture risk was similar for meat eaters, fish eaters and vegetarians. The higher fracture risk in the vegans appeared to be a consequence of their considerably lower mean calcium intake. An adequate calcium intake is essential for bone health, irrespective of dietary preferences.

    Sponsorship:The EPIC-Oxford study is supported by The Medical Research Council and Cancer Research UK. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 7 February 2007; doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1602659

  22. #72
    nonegiven
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    Default Re: Scientific health studies including vegans

    Weight gain by diet group

    Rosell M, Appleby P, Spencer E, Key T. Weight gain over 5 years in 21 966 meat-eating, fish-eating, vegetarian, and vegan men and women in EPIC-Oxford. Int J Obes (Lond). 2006; 30(9):1389-1396.

    Background: Cross-sectional studies have shown that vegetarians and vegans are leaner than omnivores. Longitudinal data on weight gain in these groups are sparse.

    Objective: We investigated changes in weight and body mass index (BMI) over a 5-year period in meat-eating, fish-eating, vegetarian, and vegan men and women in the UK.

    Design: Self-reported anthropometric, dietary and lifestyle data were collected at baseline in 1994-1999 and at follow-up in 2000-2003; the median duration of follow-up was 5.3 years.

    Subjects: A total of 21 966 men and women participating in Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition aged 20-69 years at baseline.

    Results: The mean annual weight gain was 389 (SD 884) g in men and 398 (SD 892) g in women. The differences between meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in age-adjusted mean BMI at follow-up were similar to those seen at baseline. Multivariable-adjusted mean weight gain was somewhat smaller in vegans (284 g in men and 303 g in women, P<0.05 for both sexes) and fish-eaters (338 g, women only, P<0.001) compared with meat-eaters. Men and women who changed their diet in one or several steps in the direction meat-eater --> fish-eater —> vegetarian —> vegan showed the smallest mean annual weight gain of 242 (95% CI 133-351) and 301 (95% CI 238-365) g, respectively.

    Conclusion: During 5 years follow-up, the mean annual weight gain in a health-conscious cohort in the UK was approximately 400 g. Small differences in weight gain were observed between meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans. Lowest weight gain was seen among those who, during follow-up, had changed to a diet containing fewer animal food.International Journal of Obesity (2006) 30, 1389-1396. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0803305; published online 14 March 2006

  23. #73
    nonegiven
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    Default Re: Scientific health studies including vegans

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids by diet group

    Rosell MS, Lloyd-Wright Z, Appleby PN, Sanders TA, Allen NE, Key TJ. Long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in plasma in British meat-eating, vegetarian, and vegan men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2005; 82(2):327-334.
    BACKGROUND: Plasma concentrations of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are lower in vegetarians and in vegans than in omnivores. No data are available on whether these concentrations differ between long- and short-term vegetarians and vegans.

    OBJECTIVES: We compared plasma fatty acid composition in meat-eaters, vegetarians, and vegans and examined whether the proportions of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3; EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3; DPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3; DHA) were related to the subjects’ duration of adherence to their diets or to the proportions of plasma linoleic acid (18:2n-6; LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3; ALA).

    DESIGN: The present cross-sectional study included 196 meat-eating, 231 vegetarian, and 232 vegan men in the United Kingdom. Information on anthropometry, diet, and smoking habits was obtained through a questionnaire. Total fatty acid composition in plasma was measured.

    RESULTS: The proportions of plasma EPA and DHA were lower in the vegetarians and in the vegans than in the meat-eaters, whereas only small differences were seen for DPA. Plasma EPA, DPA, and DHA proportions were not significantly associated with the duration of time since the subjects became vegetarian or vegan, which ranged from <1 y to >20 y. In the vegetarians and the vegans, plasma DHA was inversely correlated with plasma LA.

    CONCLUSIONS: The proportions of plasma long-chain n-3 fatty acids were not significantly affected by the duration of adherence to a vegetarian or vegan diet. This finding suggests that when animal foods are wholly excluded from the diet, the endogenous production of EPA and DHA results in low but stable plasma concentrations of these fatty acids

  24. #74
    nonegiven
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    Default Re: Scientific health studies including vegans

    Key TJ, Fraser GE, Thorogood M, Appleby PN, Beral V, Reeves G, Burr ML, Chang-Claude J, Frentzel-Beyme R, Kuzma JW, Mann J, McPherson K.

    Mortality in vegetarians and nonvegetarians: detailed findings from a collaborative analysis of 5 prospective studies. Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Sep;70(3 Suppl):516S-524S.
    "There were no statistically significant differences (SS) between the vegans and the regular meat-eaters for any cause of death.

    The overall mortality rate, or death rate for "all causes," was 1.00 (after adjusting for age, gender, study group, and smoking status). That means the death rate for the vegans did not differ at all from the regular meat-eaters."

    Disease Vegan Deaths
    Heart disease 17
    Stroke 4
    Lung cancer 2
    Stomach cancer 2
    Colorectal cancer 1
    Breast cancer 0
    Prostate cancer 0
    Other causes 42
    Total 68

  25. #75

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    Default Re: Scientific health studies including vegans

    Copyright on scientific papers is usually held by the person who wrote the paper and the journal which published it, so I doubt it would be legal to publish whole studies on vegan forum.
    If you were interested, you could obtain copies of the papers by writing to the corresponding author, and summarise the findings here.
    See my local diary ... http://herbwormwood.blogspot.com/

  26. #76
    nonegiven
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    Default Re: Scientific health studies including vegans

    Or anyone at a University could access them via JSTOR or similar.

    I am sure that abstract and conclusion if fully accredited would be acceptable to the copyright holders (400 words etc).

  27. #77

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    Default Re: Scientific health studies including vegans

    Probably. If the Kornator is ok with it.
    See my local diary ... http://herbwormwood.blogspot.com/

  28. #78
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Link: "Plant-Based Diet Helps Reduce Premature Aging and Disease Risk"

    Plant-Based Diet Helps Reduce Premature Aging and Disease Risk

    Plant-Based Diet Helps Reduce Premature Aging and Disease Risk
    posted 9/16/08

    In a study released today by The Lancet Oncology, Dean Ornish, M.D., and colleagues found that comprehensive lifestyle changes, including a low-fat vegan diet, increase the body’s ability to fight premature aging, cancer, heart disease, and other chronic diseases. Twenty-four men participating in a prostate cancer study switched to a plant-based diet and added daily exercise and relaxation techniques. Among other beneficial effects that were previously reported, the intervention led to increased levels of telomerase, an enzyme that protects and repairs DNA. Blood levels of telomerase increased by an average of 29 percent during the study.

    Ornish D, Lin J, Daubenmier J, et al. Increased telomerase activity and comprehensive lifestyle changes: a pilot study. Lancet Oncol [advance online publication]. September 16, 2008; DOI 10.1016/S1470-2045(08)70234-1.


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  29. #79
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Study: Vegan diets healthier for planet, people than meat diets

    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  30. #80
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Plant consumption: reduced disease risks

    There are many studies that confirm links between the consumption of animal products and serious health problems (diabetes, cancer, heart disease). The conclusion is often that "animal product X" increases the likelihood that people will suffer from "disease Y". We have several threads about this on our forum, eg. these two about cancer risk and consumption of animal products:

    Cancer, adaptation and the vegan diet
    High B12 levels associated with an up to 3-fold increased prostate cancer risk
    Another cancer study
    Cancer and animal products
    Red meat and cold cuts linked to colorectal cancer

    But there's another side of this which isn't discussed very often, namely the fact that more and more links are found between consumption of certain plant foods and the decrease of certain health risks/problems. The two are of course related, and it's of course hard to find out if a diseased meat eaters is ill because he has been eating too much animal products or because he has had a too low consumption of plant foods.

    Anyway - the idea behind this thread is to collect links showing a link (protective or healing) between plants and *not* getting diseases, getting them later than others, or having a greater chance to get well again. Some of us already have posted such links as separate threads, and while it's good idea to have a separate thread for each case, this thread can also be used as an index of other threads about this topic.

    It seems that a main health problem with consuming animal products is that non-vegans necessarily consume less plants, because for every slice of bread with something animal derived on it, you'll most likely eat less vegan food that day, simple because the animal stuff you had made you a little more full than you were before you are it, which means that you'll be less hungry and therefore eat less of something else - and that this 'something' else would be a plant based product for a vegan, but maybe some other animal products for a non-vegan.



    ---

    When I eat bread, I usually eat rye bread. Here's something I found today when googling rye:

    Rye, lignans and human health

    A short excerpt:
    Experimental evidence suggests that increased fibre intake, with a high intake of whole grains, is related to increased insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, intake of wholegrain products was associated with a decreased risk of diabetes in women in two prospective studies. Thus, the outcome of epidemiological and experimental studies suggests that substitution of refined-grain products with wholegrain products may decrease the risk of, or alternatively delay, the onset of diabetes. It is also reasonable to assume that the protective effect is associated with some factor(s) in the dietary fibre complex.
    http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=1315848
    Factors in rye bran and soy protein may inhibit prostate cancer growth. The effect is more apparent for rye than for soy. Further studies are needed to identify the effective substances and to explore the mechanism of action.
    Last edited by Korn; Nov 19th, 2011 at 02:24 PM. Reason: Merged with similar threads
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  31. #81
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    Default Re: Plant consumption and decreased health risks: An index of various findings

    This is a great post and idea. It's easy to be anti-animal products but I try to be pro-plant foods. I feel that a lot of vegans I know don't eat very many fruits and vegetables. When I find articles I will also post them here. This will be great.
    pro-vegetable

  32. #82
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    Default Re: Plant consumption and decreased health risks: An index of various findings

    Dr Duke's Phytochemical Database is a really interesting website that lists the chemicals and activities in a huge range of food and medicinal plants in a database that is searchable by different criteria, eg concentration of chemicals / activities of plants.

    http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/

    It confirms that plant foods are full of valuable nutrients and protective natural chemicals that aren't available from animal 'foods'.

    But on the other hand it's perfectly possible to be vegan and miss out on the range of goodness available from the plant kingdom, simply by filling up, not with animal foods, but white bread, chips etc.
    once in a while you can get shown the light
    in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  33. #83

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    Default Re: Plant consumption and decreased health risks: An index of various findings

    I'm surprised I haven't seen anyone in this forum talk about Gerson Therapy - it's an all vegan natural therapy developed over 100 years ago that has been shown to completely eradicate cancer (no kidding). I've had several friends and clients go through the therapy who have all completely reversed their cancer.

    The key to the diet is eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables and juicing them every day.

    There are some pretty cool videos online you can watch about Gerson Therapy like the one below on my blog

    http://healthandwellnessnewsnow.blog...ut-gerson.html

  34. #84
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Plant consumption and decreased health risks: An index of various findings

    I've posted a link to this site earlier, but there's already someone who are working on the same idea as I had for this thread, so here's the link again:

    Vegan Monthly, edited by John Livesey (PhD).

    The health section of his list/table contains a lot of links between various diseases and the preventing and sometimes healing/reducing effect of plants of various kinds. Some links between animal products and certain diseases are also opsted.

    Here's the list without embedded links. Go to his site for links to the actual articles.

    Soy consumption improves breast cancer survival.

    Meat increases risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Meat increases the risk of cancer , legumes and fruit lower it.
    Whey raises insulin and casein raises IGF-1 in boys.

    Fish consumption associated with increased diabetes risk.

    Fish does not contribute to the healthfulness of the Mediterranean diet.
    Weight-loss diets based on plant rather than animal proteins better lower cholesterol levels.

    Milk increases height of girls.

    Milk increases risk of acne in adolescent girls and boys. [girls] [boys]
    Casein raises IGF-1 and whey raises insulin levels.

    Soy consumption reduces premenopausal breast cancer risk in Chinese women.

    Dairy protein raises serum IGF-1 concentrations.

    Rigorous meta-analysis shows that Mediterranean diet helps prevent heart disease.

    Vegan diet reduces risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Soy consumption, especially in childhhod, reduces breast cancer risk in Asian American women.

    Cancer incidence is lower among vegetarians.

    Mediterranean diet pattern reduces cognitive impairment.

    Mediterranean diet pattern reduces death rates.

    Meat increases risk of colorectal cancer.

    Diets high in fruit and vegetables reduce risk of acute myocardial infarction (heart attack).

    Dairy protein and calcium associated with increased prostate cancer rate.

    Red meat raises blood pressure, non-haem iron reduces it.

    Plant-based diet reduces blood pressure.

    Mortality increased by frequent egg eating.

    Meat consumption raises risk of diabetes.

    Red meat raises cancer risk.

    Vegan diet better for weight loss.

    Diet high in vegetables, fruit, whole grains and legumes reduces risk of heart attack.

    Plant-based diet reduces risk of melanoma.

    Meat contributes to colon cancer recurrence.

    Broccoli and cauliflower reduce risk of prostate cancer.

    Fibre reduces risk of breast cancer and meat increses it.

    Dairy consumption increases risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Increased fish intake associated with higher risk of stroke in men.

    Western "meat-sweet" diet raises breast cancer rates in older Chinese.

    More evidence that meat increases breast cancer risk.

    Meat and fat consumption associated with risk of squamous cell carcinoma.

    Cured meats damage lungs.

    Meat, especially processed, associated with breast cancer risk.

    A diet rich in fruit and vegetables helps protect from asthma and allergies.

    Meat increases risk of diabetes.

    Vegetarian men smell sexier.

    The BBC tries out the Chimpanzee Diet - with reductions in cholesterol, blood pressure and weight.

    Meat increases oxidative DNA damage and cooked vegetables reduce it.

    Red meat consumption increases risk of a type of breast cancer.

    Bacon increases risk of bladder cancer.

    Vegetable sources of fat and protein lower heart disease rate compared to animal sources.

    Vegetarians have lower levels of CRP.

    Meat consumption associated with degenerative arthritis and soft tissue disorders.

    Eating vegetables slows cognitive decline.

    Two studies find meat consumption increases risk of colorectal cancer. and

    More fibre lowers CRP

    Avoiding milk lowers risk of metabolic syndrome

    Cow's milk is insulinotropic - and is an IGF-1 secretogogue too.

    Vegetarian diet lowers hsCRP.

    Vegetarian diet help lower body weight.

    Meat consumption increases risk of arthritis.

    Fruit and vegetables reduce risk of stroke.

    Whole milk increases risk of rectal and ovarian cancer.

    An apple a day really does keep the oncologist away!

    Mediterranean-style diet reduces risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Moving toward a vegan diet reduces age-related weight gain.

    Plant food reduces and meat increases blood pressure.

    Fruit, vegetables and cereals reduce risk of melanoma.

    Public health implications of meat production and consumption.

    Life-long vegetarians are at no developmental disadvantage.

    Vegetarianism reduces risk of heart disease.

    Changing from omnivorous to vegetarian diet increases ferritin levels.

    High vegetable and fruit intake reduces risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Soy reduces risk of hip fracture.

    Cereal fiber and whole-grain intake associated with slowing of coronary-artery atherosclerosis.

    Low-fat vegan diet very effective for weight loss.

    Soy consumption reduces risk of prostate cancer.

    Vegetarians less likely to have insulin resistance.

    Vegetables in childhood diet decreases adult stroke risk and fish increases it.

    Near-vegan diet may help stop or even reverse prostate cancer.

    High intakes of dairy foods and lactose may increase the risk of ovarian cancer.

    Colorectal cancer risk is positively associated with high consumption of red and processed meat.

    Non-milk drinkers may be protected against insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome.

    Mediterranean diet improves longevity.

    High consumption of vegetables, fruits, legumes and whole grains most effective for lowering cholesterol in a low fat diet.

    No evidence that milk consumption good for bones.

    Milk consumption associated with increased risk of Parkinson's disease.
    C-reactive protein and IGF-1 lower in raw food vegans than in omnivores.

    Milk consumption increases insulin and insulin resistance.

    Mortality from coronary heart disease decreases 30% when vegetable protein substituted for animal.

    Red meat is associated with development of inflammatory arthritis.

    Legume (but not meat, fish or dairy) consumption is associated with longevity.

    Red and processed meat consumption increases risk of colorectal cancer. Largest study yet.

    Fruit & veggies decrease risk of stroke.

    Milk protein stimulates insulin secretion and increases insulin resistance.

    High milk consumption increases risk of a type ovarian cancer.

    Increased fruit and vegetable intake reduces mid-life weight gain.

    High fruit consumption good for teenage bone health.

    High meat consumption increases risk of type 2 diabetes in women and men

    Higher soy consumers have lower cholesterol levels.

    Vegan wholefood diet better for weight loss and much better for cardiac disease risk factors than Atkins-type diet.

    Meat consumption increases relapse rate of ulcerative colitis.

    Red meat, processed meat, cholesterol, animal protein and heme iron are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Ovarian cancer risk increased by dietary cholesterol and eggs and decreased by vegetables.

    Fresh red meat and processed meat associated with rectal cancer.

    Soy protein better than casein for diabetics.

    High fruit consumption reduces the risk of age-related maculopathy.

    Green vegetables and fresh fruit protect against endometriosis but red meat increases risk.

    Higher intakes of red and processed meats may increase stroke risk.

    Increasing fiber, fruit and vegetable intake reduces estogen in breast cancer patients.

    Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet reduces the concentrations of inflammation and coagulation markers.

    Changing to a vegetarian diet makes you more lean.

    Cured meat consumption is correlated with risk of childhood brain tumour.

    Soy milk is better than cow milk for improving lipid profile and lowering lipid peroxidation.

    Red meat consumption increases mortality in those with high transferrin saturation.

    Vegetarians are more insulin sensitive than ominvores.

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk is increased by animal protein, saturated fat, eggs and dairy products, and decreased by fiber.

    The risk of gout is increased by meat and seafood consumption.

    Meat consumption tends to increase blood pressure and fruit & vegetables to decrease it.

    A high fiber diet is associated with a lower risk of breast cancer.

    Vegetarians may have lower rates of colorectal cancer.

    Higher plasma lycopene levels are associated with a lower risk of heart disease in women.

    Farmed salmon is high in pollutants.

    Higher dietary fiber intake slows the progression of atherosclerosis.

    Vegetarian diets may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and the risk of complications.

    Meta-analysis find meat consumption associated with risk of breast cancer.

    Meat/fish consumption in late pregancy raises cortisol in offspring, green veges lower it.

    New evidence that Crohn's disease is caused by a bacterium frequently found in cow milk.

    A suitably selected vegetarian diet lowers cholesterol as much as does lovastatin.

    Higher tomato consumption is associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

    Soy and isoflavone consumption appear to reduce risk of prostate cancer.

    Animal fat is the main source of dioxin in the diet.

    Intake of animal fat is associated with an increased risk of premenopausal breast cancer.

    Crohn's disease is probably caught by drinking cow's milk.

    Calcium balance remains positive when changing to a vegan diet.

    Fruit and vegetables to prevent and treat osteoporosis?

    Vegans have lower blood pressures than meat eaters.

    Vegans have a higher bone formation rate than omnivores but the same resorption rate.

    Chinese study finds that diets high in red meat and eggs increase the risk of colon cancer and diets high in fruit and vegetables lower the risk.

    Eating less meat boosts longevity.

    Soy protein is better for bone health than milk protein.

    Eating fish or fish oil increases the risk of cardiac death in men with angina.

    High milk intake does not lower hip fracture risk in post-menopausal women.

    Vegan diet a cure for type 2 diabetes?

    Dairy products may contribute to development of Parkinson's disease in men.

    Soy beans are a good source of iron.

    Vegan diet cuts heart disease risk.

    Nut consumption and dietary vitamin E both reduce risk of dementia.

    Dietary phytoestrogens appear to have beneficial effects on obesity & diabetes.

    Regular nut consumption reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes.

    High red meat and low vegetable consumption increases colorectal cancer in Singaporeans.

    Eating more than 15g/day of ham and/or sausage is associated with greater risk of hyperplastic colorectal polyps.

    Allium vegetables may decrease risk of prostate cancer.

    Two studies show that changing to a vegetarian diet improves blood lipids.

    Vegetarians have better glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity

    Dietary CLA appears ineffective against breast cancer in humans.

    Framingham study suggests that fruit and vegetables, not dairy, increase bone density in men.

    Soy consumption during adolescence may reduce breast cancer risk later in life.

    Low potassium intake linked to stroke.

    Cow's milk beta-casein A1 may be a risk factor for heart disease and type 1 diabetes.

    Two studies indicate that frequent egg consumption may increase risk of ovarian cancer.

    Adding soy to the diet is more effective than adding either low fat dairy food or casein for reducing the risk of heart disease.

    A diet high in vitamin E slows cognitive decline.

    Soy consumption probably reduces the risk of breast cancer.

    Increased fruit and vegetable intake reduced blood pressure in a controlled trial.

    Low iron status is no more prevalent among vegans than omnivores.

    Diet rich in vitamin E-containing foods may reduce Alzheimer's disease risk.

    High fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with decreased all-cause mortality.

    Higher fibre and monounsaturated fat intake seems to reduce risk of early menarche.

    A diet high in vitamin C and magnesium correlates with better lung function.

    Dietary cholesterol linked to bowel cancer.

    Among South Asian migrants in England, a high intake of vegetables, pulses and fibre halved the risk of breast cancer.

    Vegetarian teenagers have a healthier diet than their meat-eating peers.

    Supplementing a low protein diet with soy protein lowers blood pressure.

    Why do populations who consume low-calcium diets have fewer fractures than do Western societies who consume high-calcium diets?

    Meta-analysis suggests egg consumption adversely alters the cholesterol profile.

    A very low fat, vegan diet can lessen the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

    High-meat, low carbohydrate diets in pregnancy result in raised blood pressure in adult offspring.

    Flaxseed (linseed) consumption improves the lipid profile in women.

    There is an inverse correlation between legume consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease.

    In older women higher cholesterol and LDL levels are associated with increased likelihood of cognitive impairment.

    Frequent consumption of tomato products is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer.

    Eating processed meats raises diabetes risk in men.

    Increasing fibre in the diet improved mental health.

    A recent review concludes that for CHD prevention, animal products should be eaten only sparingly.

    Increased fiber intake from fruit, vegetables and wholegrains correlates with reduced heart disease.

    High consumption of animal products and low consumption of vegetable products is associated with increased breast cancer mortality.

    Restricting intake of animal protein and salt reduces the recurrence rate of calcium oxalate stones in men with hypercalciuria.

    Low consumption of plant foods and high consumption of red meat appear to increase the risk of lung cancer.

    High intakes of vitamin A as retinol (from animal sources and supplements) are associated with with hip fracture in post-menopausal women whereas vitamin A as carotene (the plant form) is not.

    Vegan diet and exercise tends to slow the increase of PSA in men with elevated PSA post- prostatectomy.

    Even when both groups are eating healthy diets, ovo-lacto vegetarians show a better blood lipid profile than omnivores.

    A diet high in phytoestrogen is associated with higher bone mineral density in post-menopausal women.

    Citrus fruit pectin may be anti-carcinogenic.

    A gluten-free vegan diet improves rheumatoid arthritis.

    Populations consuming low-calcium diets have fewer fractures than do Western societies consuming high-calcium diets. Diets high in fruit and vegetables, not dairy products, help prevent fractures.

    Exposure to cow's milk is a major risk factor for both diabetes and multiple sclerosis.

    Case control study finds animal-derived nutrients associated with higher risk of stomach and esophageal cancers. Plant-derived nutrients are associated with a lower incidence. [more]
    A case of sacroliitis is much improved by a vegan diet.

    Physician's Health Study shows that high calcium intake from dairy products may increase risk of prostate cancer.

    "Western" cancers may be related to consumption of animal products.

    A vegan diet may protect against Parkinson's Disease.

    A long-term study shows that soy-based infant formula is just as safe as cow's-milk-based formula. [more]
    Low potassium intake (that is to say, low fruit and vegetables) is associated with increased risk of stroke.

    Vegetarians can expect to live two years longer than meat-eaters.

    Meta-analysis indicates that meat consumption is associated with a modest increase in colorectal cancer risk.

    Thickening of the walls of arteries may be related to low levels of lutein.

    Diet low in animal protein improves blood glucose in Type 2 diabetics.

    Among elderly Chinese women vegetarians have one third the risk of heart disease.

    Eating fruit and vegetables is good for the lungs.

    Consuming small quantities of nuts cuts heart disease risk.

    Those with the highest plasma vitamin C levels have half the death rate of those with the lowest levels - so eat up your fruit and vegetables (supplements not effective!).

    Even low-fat dairy products should not be consumed since the removed fat still enters the food chain to cause heart disease. Red meat likely increases the risk of cancer. Much other epidemiologically based advice on diet and exercise.

    Foods of animal origin are associated with a higher prevalence of asthma in Taiwanese teenagers.

    Elderly Americans eat too much meat.

    Low animal product consumption could be the reason Alzheimer's disease and dementia are less than half as common in Ibadan as in Indianapolis.

    Energetic promotion of the 5+ A Day message could reduce cancer incidence by a third

    High soy milk consumption appears to greatly reduce risk of prostate cancer.

    A high ratio of animal to vegetable dietary protein is related to hip fracture in women

    Low density lipoproteins of Taiwanese vegans and vegetarians are less oxidizable than those of omnivores

    The Cornell China Study finds that the higher the proportion of plant-based foods in the diet, the lower the rate of coronary artery disease , that animal protein is not needed to promote childhood growth , and that a substantial change in American dietary patterns from animal based foods to plant based foods must occur for there to be a substantial change in disease incidence patterns.

    Vegan diet-based lifestyle programme rapidly lowers plasma homocysteine levels

    Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity & cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity

    Vegetarian children grow and mature similarly to their omnivorous counterparts

    Can a dairy-free diet cure breast cancer?

    Is the increasing Western rate of obesity due to consumption of animal protein?

    A low-fat vegetarian diet improves the serum lipid profile in women

    There is consistent and strong evidence that a high risk of colo-rectal cancer is associated with a low intake of vegetables and of whole grains

    The Oxford Vegetarian Study finds that non-meat-eaters have a 20% lower death rate overall than meat eaters (and only half the risk of an emergency appendectomy!) and, of particular interest to vegans, mortality from ischemic heart disease is positively associated with dietary cholesterol

    Vegan men have lower levels of the hormone IGF-1, which may result in a lower risk of some cancers.

    So do women.

    A living food vegan diet seems to benefit rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Healthy vegan diets are becoming much easier to sustain with the increasing availability of a variety of plant foods, nutritional supplements and sound information

    An almost vegan diet reverses coronary heart disease with improvement continuing for at least 5 years

    Eating soy lowers cholesterol and reduces the risk of osteoporosis

    Cross-cultural comparisons show that animal foods are strongly linked to coronary heart disease.

    Consuming dairy products does not protect against bone fractures in women or in men

    Egg consumption correlates with the incidence of cancer of the colon and rectum.

    Animal product consumption is positively associated with major diseases and all-cause mortality.
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  35. #85
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    Default Raspberries and rasperry seed oil

    Red Raspberries
    Health Benefits
    Red Raspberries contain strong antioxidants such as Vitamin C, quercetin and gallic acid that fight against cancer, heart and circulatory disease and age-related decline. They are high in ellagic acid, a known chemopreventative, and have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. Red raspberry ketones are currently being used in Japan as a weight loss supplement. Red raspberry seed oil is creating market interest in the cosmeceutical industry because it is rich in Vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acid and has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 24-50.

    High in polyphenolic compounds known for their anti-cancer properties.
    Contain strong antioxidants such as Vitamin C, quercetin and gallic acid.
    Have a high ORAC level – ORAC is a measure of the antioxidant capacity of a substance. Red raspberries with an ORAC of 24 µmole/TE/g are similar to blueberries, well known for their antioxidant values.
    Raspberries have been shown to inhibit the production of COX-I and COX-II enzymes. Anti inflammatory products like ibuprofen and aspirin, inhibit COX-I and COX-II resulting in the reduction of pain associated with arthritis, gout and other inflammatory conditions.
    Eating whole berries has been shown in scientific studies to be more beneficial than taking the individual phytochemicals in the form of dietary supplements.
    Red raspberry oil is creating interest in the cosmeceutical market (skin care products which provide health benefits). The oil from raspberry seeds is rich in Vitamin E, Omega-3 fatty acids and has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 25-50.
    Red raspberry ketones are currently being used in Japan as a weight loss supplement in a pill form and as an external patch.

    Red Raspberry Seed Oil
    (Rubus idaeus)

    Cold pressed - Certified Organic, Product of Canada

    Extraordinarily high in Omega-3 and Omega 6 fatty acids, Red Rasperry Seed oil is a superb anti-oxidant. It contains 83% essential fatty acids. Much research is available online showing the healthcare benefits of internal use of Red Raspberry Seed oil. Its high level of Vitamin E is known to be give it an important role in skin repair and conditioning. Although this Red Raspberry Seed Oil is certainly produced for internal use, we are not licensed to produce or sell food supplements, so we recommend it for skincare and cosmetic applications.

    Red Raspberry Oil is known especially for its prevention of gingivitis, rashes, eczema and other skin lesions. It is useful in skin creams, bath oils, and tooth paste. Raspberry seed oil is emollient, lubricating, conditioning, creates a lipid barrier providing protection to the skin and provides moisture retention for the skin. Its anti-inflammatory properties are greater than those of better known oils such as virgin Avocado Oil, Grapeseed Oil, Hazelnut Oil and Wheatgerm Oil. (Oomah, et al 2000.)

    Red Raspberry Seed Oil may act as a broad-spectrum UV-A and UV-B shield. It has shown an SPF of between 28 and 50 and thus is a valuable ingredient in natural sunblocks and sunscreens. It has a long shelf life because of its high phospholipid content, and may increase the stability of other carrier oils when blended with them. (Oomah, et al 2000.)

    "Raspberry Seed Oil contains exceptionally high levels of alpha and gamma tocopherols (vit. E), vit. A and omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. This provides the skin with significant broad spectrum protecion from damaging UV-A and UV-B rays."

    Oils of Nature, 2008, O'lenick, Steinberg, Kelin and LaVay



    Read more: http://www.naturesgift.com/carrier_o...#ixzz0itjhVYGi
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  36. #86
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Plant consumption and health risks

    More Fruits and Vegetables and Less Fat Help Reduce Hormone-Related Cancer
    December 18 2008
    High-fiber, low-fat diets reduce recurrence of breast cancer by 31 percent in women with higher estrogen levels, according to a new report from the Women's Healthy Living and Eating Lifestyle Study. Almost 3,000 breast cancer survivors were randomly assigned to either a special high-fiber diet including five vegetable servings, 16 ounces of vegetable juice, and three fruit servings daily, or a comparison diet based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's five-a-day guidelines - a total of five servings of fruits and vegetables daily.

    Study/Research Reference: Gold EB, Pierce JP, Natarajan L, et al. Dietary Pattern Influences Breast Cancer Prognosis in Women Without Hot Flashes: The Women's Healthy Eating and Living Trial. J Clin Oncol. Dec 15 2008.
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  37. #87
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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  38. #88
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Nursingdegree.net: 57 Health Benefits of Going Vegan

    Last edited by Korn; Jul 1st, 2010 at 08:28 AM.
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  39. #89
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    Default Re: The Healthiest Diet of All

    Here are some vegan doctors discussing what the healthiest vegan diet would be...

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  40. #90
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default 57 health benefits of eating vegan from nursingdegree.net

    From nursingdegree.net:
    57 Health Benefits of Going Vegan

    An excerpt:

    Vegans are frequently misunderstood as fringe eaters with an unnatural passion for animal rights. While many vegans do feel passionately about animals, its time for others to see that a vegan diet and lifestyle go way beyond animal rights. Following a healthy, balanced vegan diet ensures a host of health benefits as well as prevention of some of the major diseases striking people in North America. Read these blogs to find out about the health benefits or going vegan or just provide better information to your patients.

    Nutrition
    All of the following nutritional benefits come from a vegan diet full of foods such as fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans, and soy products.
    Reduced saturated fats. Dairy products and meats contain a large amount of saturated fats. By reducing the amount of saturated fats from your diet, you’ll improve your health tremendously, especially when it comes to cardiovascular health.
    Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates provide energy for your body. When you don’t have enough carbohydrates, your body will burn muscle tissue.
    Fiber. A diet high in fiber (as vegan eating usually is) leads to healthier bowel movements. High fiber diets help fight against colon cancer.
    Magnesium. Aiding in the absorption of calcium, magnesium is an often overlooked vitamin in importance to a healthy diet. Nuts, seeds, and dark leafy greens are an excellent source of magnesium.
    Potassium. Potassium balances water and acidity in your body and stimulates the kidneys to eliminate toxins. Diets high in potassium have shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer.
    Folate. This B vitamin is an important part of a healthy diet. Folate helps with cell repair, generating red and white blood cells, and metabolizing amino acids.
    Antioxidants. For protection against cell damage, antioxidants are one of the best ways to help your body. Many researchers also believe that antioxidants help protect your body against forming some types of cancer.
    Vitamin C. Besides boosting your immune system, Vitamin C also helps keep your gums healthy and helps your bruises heal faster. Vitamin C is also an antioxidant.
    Vitamin E. This powerful vitamin has benefits for your heart, skin, eyes, brain, and may even help prevent Alzheimer’s Disease. A diet high in grains, nuts, and dark leafy greens is full of Vitamin E.
    Phytochemicals. Plant-based foods provide phytochemicals, which help to prevent and heal the body from cancer, boost protective enzymes, and work with antioxidants in the body.
    Protein. That protein is good for your body is no surprise. It may be a surprise to learn that most Americans eat too much protein and in forms such as red meat that are not healthy ways of getting protein. Beans, nuts, peas, lentils, and soy products are all great ways to get the right amount of protein in a vegan diet.

    Disease Prevention
    Eating a healthy vegan diet has shown to prevent a number of diseases. Find out from the list below what you could potentially avoid just by switching to a healthy, balanced vegan way of eating.
    Cardiovascular disease. Eating nuts and whole grains, while eliminating dairy products and meat, will improve your cardiovascular health. A British study indicates that a vegan diet reduces the risk for heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. Vegan diets go far in preventing heart attack and stroke.
    Cholesterol. Eliminating any food that comes from an animal and you will eliminate all dietary cholesterol from your diet. Your heart will thank you for that.
    Blood pressure. A diet rich in whole grains is beneficial to your health in many ways, including lowering high blood pressure.
    Type 2 diabetes. Not only is a vegan diet a weapon against Type 2 diabetes, it is also "easier to follow than the standard diet recommended by the American Diabetic Association." Read more about it here.
    Prostate cancer. A major study showed that men in the early stages of prostate cancer who switched to a vegan diet either stopped the progress of the cancer or may have even reversed the illness.
    Colon cancer. Eating a diet consisting of whole grains, along with fresh fruits and vegetables, can greatly reduce your chances of colon cancer.
    Breast cancer. Countries where women eat very little meat and animal products have a much lower rate of breast cancer than do the women in countries that consume more animal products.
    Macular degeneration. Diets with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, especially leafy greens, carrots, pumpkin, and sweet potatoes, can help prevent the onset of age-related macular degeneration.
    Cataracts. Much the same way macular degeneration is headed off by a vegan diet, cataracts are also thought to be prevented through the intake of the same fruits and vegetables. Produce high in antioxidants are also believed to help prevent cataracts.
    Arthritis. Eliminating dairy consumption has long been connected with alleviating arthritis symptoms, but a new study indicates that a combination of gluten-free and vegan diet is very promising for improving the health of those suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.
    Osteoporosis. Bone health depends on a balance of neither too much or too little protein, adequate calcium intake, high potassium, and low sodium. With a healthy vegan diet, all four of these points set a perfect scenario for preventing osteoporosis.
    More here: http://www.nursingdegree.net/blog/19...f-going-vegan/
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  41. #91
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    Default Re: 57 health benefits of going vegan from nursingdegree.net

    Excellent!

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    Default Scientific proof as to the benefits of eating vegan

    I was discussing with my boyfriend the other day what would happen if we lived together (he's an omnivore), as his idea of cooking is driving to McDonalds, ordering take away or making mi goreng, so I would want to do all the cooking.
    His reason for not being a vegan at the moment is that he is too lazy to cook vegan food (even though eating a piece of fruit is easier than driving to McDonalds for a snack), and when I said I would do the cooking, he said that he doesn't think a vegan lifestyle is all that healthy. So, if anyone out there has links or names of scientific studies, or websites (preferably with a .gov .edu or .org ending), it would be greatly appreciated if you could post them here. Because I've looked and so far only managed to find one or two, which rant on about B12, calcium, protein, etc deficiencies in vegan and basically say the only benefits is a lowered risk of heart disease, and being skinnier.
    Last edited by Korn; Nov 27th, 2011 at 11:50 PM. Reason: This was the first post in a similar thread

  43. #93
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    Default Re: Scientific proof as to the benefits of eating vegan

    Hi,
    It's going to be hard to find studies generally comparing living on a plant based diet with living on a standard diet, because most studies are about specific topics, not general topics.

    This statement is often quoted (see below). It's from American Dietetic Association ("the world's largest organization of food and nutrition professionals"), and generally based on independent studies from reliable sources:

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat (including fowl) or seafood, or products containing those foods. This article reviews the current data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, n-3 fatty acids, iron, zinc, iodine, calcium, and vitamins D and B-12. A vegetarian diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, supplements or fortified foods can provide useful amounts of important nutrients. An evidence-based review showed that vegetarian diets can be nutritionally adequate in pregnancy and result in positive maternal and infant health outcomes. The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals. The variability of dietary practices among vegetarians makes individual assessment of dietary adequacy essential. In addition to assessing dietary adequacy, food and nutrition professionals can also play key roles in educating vegetarians about sources of specific nutrients, food purchase and preparation, and dietary modifications to meet their needs.
    There's a broad range of studies documenting all kinds of unwanted side effects of consumption of animal products. Here, for example, is a collection of independet studies showing the link between the 20-30 most common cancer types and intake of various animal products:
    20-30 types of cancer and animal products (eggs, fish, milk, meat)
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  44. #94

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    Default Re: Scientific proof as to the benefits of eating vegan

    Well, google for the "China Study".

    It's the largest study on the link between nutrition and health undertaken so far (> 10 years, 6500 participants), and the basic findings of it was that those who follow a plant based diet do typically not fall prey to the "diseases of affluence" like cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabets etc.

    Those of the participants (the study was done in rural china) who changed their "traditional" plant-based diet for a western-style animal-product-centered diet also had the same amount of occurrence of these diseases (like we have in "industrialized" countries)

    Best regards,
    Andy

    PS: Of course, if your idea of a vegan diet is French fries, vegan pizza and pasta, cupcakes and buckets of sprite, then the health bonus will not be the same. In fact, you can live a very unhealthy life as a vegan, not just as an omni.

  45. #95
    Jaitee
    Guest

    Default Re: Scientific proof as to the benefits of eating vegan

    andy_T the china study doesnt actually say what people think it does ill link you to an article that broke it down and proved that he jumped to many many wrong conclusions

    http://rawfoodsos.com/2010/07/07/the...act-or-fallac/

    in short he ignores some evidence because it contradicts him and he only used caesin in his studies yet claims it proves all animal protein is bad....that would be like me saying that i say a guy eat nightshade and die therefore all plants are bad
    its been a while since i read that whole article but i think it also showed that either campbells own study or someoneone elses study actually resulted in the monkeys or rats he gave large amounts of caesin too living longer

  46. #96
    vito27
    Guest

    Default Re: Scientific proof as to the benefits of eating vegan

    i knew it, i knew it, I KNEW IT!!!!!
    i shake my fist in the air!!!

  47. #97

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Petaling Jaya, Malaysia
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    772

    Default Re: Scientific proof as to the benefits of eating vegan

    Quote Jaitee View Post
    andy_T the china study doesnt actually say what people think it does ill link you to an article that broke it down and proved that he jumped to many many wrong conclusions

    http://rawfoodsos.com/2010/07/07/the...act-or-fallac/

    in short he ignores some evidence because it contradicts him and he only used caesin in his studies yet claims it proves all animal protein is bad....that would be like me saying that i say a guy eat nightshade and die therefore all plants are bad
    its been a while since i read that whole article but i think it also showed that either campbells own study or someoneone elses study actually resulted in the monkeys or rats he gave large amounts of caesin too living longer
    Hello Jaitee,

    thank you for your reply!

    However, please observe that the article by Denise Minger you link to might claim to "prove" some things, but calling it so does not make it a proof.
    There are other replies to the claims in the article, and even a rather detailed response by T. Colin Campbell himself:
    http://www.vegsource.com/news/2010/0...se-minger.html
    http://www.tcolincampbell.org/filead...ercritique.pdf

    I tend to rather believe an international team of university professors who undertook a 10-year-study and published the results in peer-reviewed medical publications than a 23-year old student who analyzes some raw statistical data without the proper knowledge how to do it and then publishes her results on her facebook page. But of course you are free to disagree here.

    Best regards,
    Andy

  48. #98
    Not currently a vegan
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    11

    Lightbulb Re: Benefits of living on a vegan diet?

    Quote gertvegan View Post
    Make no mistake, you and your diet are being manipulated by the vested interests of a consumer society which has no real interest in health but a preoccupation with profit. You don't have to be part of it and can start right now by taking responsibility for your own health and go veg*n. In the process you will help to bring an end the obscenity of factory farming, help to diminish the onslaught which is killing the world's oceans; you will begin to offer hope to the world's starving and the environment will start to recover. It is one of the most important actions you can take in a world which is in frighteningly rapid decline, much of it caused by livestock production, fishing and fish farming.

    This is from the Viva! website, you can read the rest of the article from Viva! HERE.

    Don't get mad, get vegan.

    Hi everyone,
    It really great quote "Health is only wealth" and by being vegan it is somewhat possible.Vegan Diet and daily workout is great combination for those who want to be healthy and fit. So be vegetarian and live you life happily.

    Thanks
    Andry

  49. #99

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Winston-Salem
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Is a vegan diet more healthy? Evidence please.

    Hey there catmogg,

    I am a distance runner and have been completely plant-based (vegan) since January. I can attest that my body performs better on my new diet. Not only has my performance increased (running time), but I can recover from my runs faster than ever. I invite you to check out my blog forkstofeet.com and show your friend how plant-based has changed my life. It could change his as well. Here is an article I wrote about my switch to vegan and exactly how it has promoted my running career and overall health: http://www.forkstofeet.com/2013/07/m...ves-story.html . I hope that you find this resourceful. If you have any other questions, please let me know.

  50. #100

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Study: Vegan diets healthier for planet, people than meat diets

    Definitely health and the environment! Plus being vegan is a great way to keep your body in shape. Below is a great and informative article discussing the health benefits of being vegan.

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