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Thread: Eggs, cancer and mortality

  1. #1
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Eggs, cancer and mortality

    http://www.thehaymeadow.com/artman/p...ticle_58.shtml

    Two excerpts:

    CHICKEN EGGS AND CANCER

    It is interesting that in the early days at Bristol Dr Forbes used to provide a protein powder but discontinued this as he found - as did others - that the cancer does in fact FEED from the protein before it gets metabolised into healthy tissue. Now there is a case for protein powder when the individual is weak, the source and type of protein is very definitely a key factor. While the observation is correct that egg protein has a biological value of 100, caution would be needed, as the downside of commercial eggs (and most free range eggs) is that this protein source is known to contain added carcinogen components.

    The researcher Campbell did many studies with eggs and milk proteins that have been replicated by many other researchers. Essentially, he found that these animal proteins are not desirable to a compromised immune system. To quote:

    “What he discovered was that protein did indeed promote cancer development. However it was not all types of protein. What Campbell discovered was that casein, which comprises 85% of the protein in cow’s milk, promoted cancer in all stages of its development. The safe protein, that which did not promote cancer, was plant based.”
    (This is a little confusing, because while eggs contain animal proteins, they don't contain casein.)
    The carcinogens in eggs are not just the dyes. Of equal concern is that it is not the egg but what is in it that may very well be unhelpful for sensitivity to cancer management. My main concern is the carcinogen dioxin. This foul material (no pun intended) is to be found at alarming levels in commercial and free range eggs in 17 countries in the EU tested so far. The concern is that dioxin, as we know, competes with Estrogens for attachment to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor located on certain cells. After dioxin has attached to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor it is transported to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of cells where it binds to cellular proteins and causes the activation of genes. There is informed debate that this DNA restructuring produces a “Cancer Protein” and much has been written and researched on this topic.

    It is additionally known that the Polyphenol Curcumin partially blocks the toxicity of dioxin (curcumin competes with dioxin for binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor - however dioxin is a more potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonist compared to curcumin, and therefore curcumin can only partially block the effects of dioxin).

    A recent report is quoted below, but there should be concern about the kidneys and the excretory mechanisms for dioxin. In addition, levels of PCBs are much higher than thought even two years ago.

    To be safe, we would need to be aware of the feed provided to the chicken.

    The brief report summary below provides further thought-provoking matters beyond dioxin and PCB.

    A study of free-range chicken eggs found the widespread presence of substances that should be added to the Stockholm Convention: lindane and brominated flame retardants. Twelve locations in nine countries were sampled for brominated flame retardants while 24 locations in 17 countries were examined for lindane. Lindane, beta-HCH and the PBDE flame retardants were found in all samples. Another flame retardant, HBCD, appeared in 80% of the samples. Lindane is a neurotoxin, probable carcinogen, suspected endocrine disrupter and banned in 52 countries. PBDEs resemble PCBs and cause long-term neurological damage. To our knowledge, these are the first sampling data on PBDEs in many of these countries.
    There are some links/discussion related to eggs and cancer here.

  2. #2
    cobweb
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    Default Re: 'Free range' eggs, dioxin, cancer, lindane, protein and flame retardants

    Korn i see you are making your point clearly! .

    Seriously, great links/info .

  3. #3
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Eggs, cancer and mortality

    Increased Egg Consumption Linked to Mortality
    April 10 2008
    In the Physicians' Health Study I, which included 21,327 participants with an average 20 year follow-up, researchers found that those who consumed seven or more eggs per week had an almost 25 percent increased risk of death than those with the lowest egg consumption. For participants with diabetes, the risk of death was twofold compared to those who consumed the least amount of eggs.

    Cholesterol intake is positively correlated to an increased risk of coronary heart disease. One large egg contains approximately 215 mg of cholesterol. The American Heart Association advises eating less than 300 mg per day, and less than 200 mg for those with heart disease. There is no biological requirement for dietary cholesterol.

    Djoussé L, Gaziano JM. Egg consumption in relation to cardiovascular disease and mortality: the Physicians' Health Study. Am J Clin Nutr.2008;87:964-969.

    For information about nutrition and health, please visit www.pcrm.org.

    Breaking Medical News is a service of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, 5100 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20016.

    Reference: PCRM.
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  4. #4
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Increased Egg Consumption Linked to Mortality

    Also (from 1994):
    Egg consumption and cancer of the colon and rectum.


    Eur J Cancer Prev. 1994 May;3(3):237-45.
    Egg consumption and cancer of the colon and rectum.
    Steinmetz KA, Potter JD.

    Division of Epidemiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55454-1015.
    We systematically reviewed 15 previous case-control and cohort studies that examined egg consumption as a risk factor for cancers of the colon and rectum. Nine of the 11 studies of colon cancer reported risk estimates consistent with a positive association; in three of these studies the association was statistically significant. The positive association for egg consumption was generally stronger for females than for males, and for cancer of the proximal, rather than distal colon. Six of eight studies of cancer of the rectum reported risk estimates consistent with a positive association; in two of these studies the association was statistically significant. Notably, in every study that met specific design criteria (defined a priori), risk estimates were consistent with a positive association. Two studies reported seven- to eight-fold increases in risk with high egg consumption. In some studies, positive associations remained after adjustment for intakes of macronutrients or for other food groups. The presence of a variety of bioactive compounds, including cholesterol, lends biological plausibility to a role of egg consumption in the aetiology of colorectal cancer.

    PMID: 8061589 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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  5. #5
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Eggs and cancer

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.2910510603/abstract

    Multivariate conditional logistic regression modelling indicates that consumption of eggs is associated with increased risk for colon cancer (odds ratios by quartile: 1.0, 1.58, 2.02, 4.66), as are some dairy products (ORs of 1.93 for the highest quartile of consumption of cheese).
    (1992, first published online 2006)

    International Journal of Cancer
    Volume 51, Issue 6, pages 851–857, 30 July 1992
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  6. #6
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Egg consumption and cancer of the colon and rectum

    Egg consumption and cancer of the colon and rectum (1994)

    We systematically reviewed 15 previous case-control and cohort studies that examined egg consumption as a risk factor for cancers of the colon and rectum. Nine of the 11 studies of colon cancer reported risk estimates consistent with a positive association; in three of these studies the association was statistically significant.

    [...]

    Notably, in every study that met specific design criteria (defined a priori), risk estimates were consistent with a positive association. Two studies reported seven- to eight-fold increases in risk with high egg consumption. In some studies, positive associations remained after adjustment for intakes of macronutrients or for other food groups.
    European Journal of Cancer Prevention,
    May 1994 - Volume 3 - Issue 3
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  7. #7
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Data from 34 countries: Eggs and colon, rectal and bladder cancer

    http://www.cancerproject.org/ask/eggs.php
    While egg consumption and cancer risk have not been studied as thoroughly as the consumption of meat and dairy products as they relate to cancer risk, there is still enough evidence to encourage dietary alternatives to both egg whites and egg yolks. The most convincing evidence points to egg consumption as increasing risk for colorectal cancer and bladder cancer.

    A case-control study done in Argentina found that people consuming approximately 1 ˝ eggs per week had nearly 5 times the colorectal cancer risk compared with individuals consuming less than 11 eggs per year. And, the World Health Organization analyzed data from 34 countries and determined that egg consumption was significantly and positively correlated with mortality from colon and rectal cancers in both men and women. Moderate egg consumption also tripled the risk of developing bladder cancer as determined by a case-control study of 130 newly diagnosed bladder cancer patients published in the journal International Urology and Nephrology.ly correlated with mortality from colon, rectal cancers
    References:
    Iscovich JM, L'Abbe KA, Castelleto R, Calzona A, Bernedo A, Chopita NA, Jmelnitzsky AC, Kaldor J. Colon cancer in Argentina. I: Risk from intake of dietary items. Int J Cancer. 1992 Jul 30;51(6):851-7

    Zhang J, Zhao Z, Berkel HJ. Egg consumption and mortality from colon and rectal cancers: an ecological study. Nutr Cancer. 2003;46(2):158-65.
    Radosavljevic V, Jankovic S, Marinkovic J, Dokic M. Diet and bladder cancer: a case-control study. Int Urol Nephrol. 2005;37(2):283-9.
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  8. #8
    Karma Junkie vava's Avatar
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    Default Re: Data from 34 countries: Eggs and colon, rectal and bladder cancer

    Wondering how long it will be and how many pieces of research will need to be carried out before the mainstream think about the correlation between cancers and animal products. I am sure there are other forums that discuss such studies but they don't as far as I know crop up where the mainstream will see or hear about them. Pity.
    even perfect isn't perfect - Rubyduby 4th July 08

  9. #9
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eggs, cancer and mortality

    From Science Daily, yesterday:
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0813155640.htm

    Newly published research led by Western's Dr. David Spence shows that eating egg yolks accelerates atherosclerosis in a manner similar to smoking cigarettes.
    Surveying more than 1200 patients, Spence found regular consumption of egg yolks is about two-thirds as bad as smoking when it comes to increased build-up of carotid plaque, a risk factor for stroke and heart attack. The research is published online in the journal Atherosclerosis.
    Atherosclerosis, also called coronary artery disease, is a disorder of the arteries where plaques, aggravated by cholesterol, form on the inner arterial wall. Plaque rupture is the usual cause of most heart attacks and many strokes.

    Full article here:
    Egg Yolk Consumption Almost as Bad as Smoking When It Comes to Atherosclerosis, Study Suggests

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  10. #10
    baffled harpy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eggs, cancer and mortality

    That seems as though it would give egg-eaters pause. It doesn't seem to have been picked up by the mainstream press here much so far apart from http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...e-8007762.html but perhaps it will be now it's been on Science Daily.

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