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Thread: B12 in shiitake

  1. #1
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default B12 in shiitake

    From http://danr.ucop.edu/ihrmp/oak34.htm :


    'According to Dr. Kanichi Mori, the shiitake lowers serum cholesterol, has both strong anti-tumor and anti-viral properties, has very low fat, no starch, and more vitamin B12 than milk and fish.'
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  2. #2
    chakra's Avatar
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    Default Twelve bucks a pound and worth it.

    They don't weigh much. Still $12/lb is steep. Hopefully the cost will eventually be easier. From my first try the shitake seemed richer and just feels more nutritious.
    I am a tangerine ;)

  3. #3
    PinkFluffyCloud
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    Do you have to eat the Mushrooms raw to benefit from the B12?

  4. #4
    Kim[ba]'s Avatar
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    Default

    I have had a very bad reaction to shiitakes when I've eaten them raw, cooked, and in capsule form I get really nauseated and then have bad, but quick, diahrrea. Anyone know what might be the cause of this? Is it an allergy? I don't get this reaction from white buttons, or portabellas.

  5. #5
    1vegan
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    Quote Korn
    From http://danr.ucop.edu/ihrmp/oak34.htm :


    'According to Dr. Kanichi Mori, the shiitake lowers serum cholesterol, has both strong anti-tumor and anti-viral properties, has very low fat, no starch, and more vitamin B12 than milk and fish.'
    I tried to find some more info on this, but couldn't find it

    I found a interview with Dr.Kanichi Mori, but in that interview there was no mention of shiitake.

    After a small search (30 minutes only) I can only say that it's bases on a article in the American Healt Magazine in May 1987. (and I can't find that article online)

    On the IVU site they say:
    Mushrooms cultivated on manure enriched compost will contain vitamin B12. If the mushrooms are not over washed before use they will contain some B12. There is 0.26ug of vitamin B12 in 100g of mushrooms. A serving of 4-6 mushrooms weighs 75g.
    (Italized part, italized by me)

    But they mention manure, while Shiitake grow on logs of wood.

    So far I can't find anything to back the claim Dr.Kanichi makes.

    I did find a few mentions that mushrooms contain a b12 analog / non-active b12.

    Australian Consumer Organisation
    http://www.choice.com.au/viewArticle...tid=100008&p=3

    This one does at least give a source, but I couldn't find the source they mention online
    http://www.trianglevegsociety.org/gr...v11_1/b12.html

    I'm not that what the page Korn links to is wrong, but I'd like to see more info before I really trust it.

  6. #6

    Default

    Shiitake grow on wood naturaly, but it is possible to grow them in compost. The thing about fruiting fungi is that it doesn't care what it's grown on, only that it's enzymes can break it down and that it has the nutrients it needs.

    B12 analogs/real B12 is a marketing thing, there is no such thing as pure B12 in anything found in nature. Not unless you can find a situation where every molecule a bacterium encounters is cobalt. That does not happen.
    Fungi will absorb B12 directly regardless of the molecule it's based on.

    Also shiitake is best cooked, as fungi can harbor salmonella and other pathogens. Also raw fungi fruit are not especially damaged by cooking like plants are, as they are mostly amino acids.

    Lastly, shiitake are pretty easy to grow. Unless keeping a contant environment and spraying a mist of water on a mushroom patch is too hard, you can grow your own.

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