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Thread: Ways to help the environment

  1. #1

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    Default Ways to help the environment

    Are vegans more eco-friendly? I think the answer is obviously yes- as animal welfare anwareness goes hand in hand with eco-awareness.

    How many of you use your feet or bike instead of diriving - or if you have long distances public transport instead of private?

    How many of you recycle? How much do you recycle? Even kitchen waste?

    How many of you are water-savers and energy efficient light bulbs etc?

    How many of you have veggie gardens of your own?

    ...

  2. #2
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    This year, I celebrated Earth Day by starting a bottle and can recycling program at my work. I have made special boxes for the employees and visitors to put their empty drink bottles and cans into. When the boxes are full, I take them in to the local grocery store, and they send them away to be recycled. The money collected goes into a staff piggy bank and when we have enough, we'll decide what to do with it.

    At home, I recycle as much as I can - however, living in an apartment building, we aren't supplied with the same recycling collection programs as the houses in the area (ie, cardboard and paper recycling). If I lived in a house, I would do all of that plus have a compost heap!

    As a member of EarthSave Canada, I have become a lot more aware of the human toll on the environment, and have started to really look at the way that I live and how I can reduce my environmental footprint eg, water wastage, electricity use, using recycled paper products etc.


    Yes, I agree - I think vegans do tend to be more ecologically aware than your average joe.

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    I am a student so of course recycling without the facilities and a car is very difficult but I definietely want to recycle when I have my own place - paper, bottles, cans, etc an garden wste if i have a garden so that i can have some really nice veggie growing in home composte!

    At the moment the best I can do is turn lights out wherever I go that arent in use - most students seem to take electricity for granted if they are not paying for it and I try to be mindful of water usage. I try to use minial cling film and alumiumI keep my heating down to a minimum and I always use my feet instead of th buses or taxis. If I have long distances to travel I have no choice but to use public transport as I have no private vehicle anyway! If and when I get my driving licence and a car - I would hope to run it on one of the more eco-friendly energy sources.

    At home I cycle or walk everywhere - sometimes catch trains into the city. We have a fantastic recycling program - one bin for general waste, one for glass, and one for paper cardboard plastic milk bottle. The cans are steel instead of aluminium so they go in the general waste and are pulled out by magnets by the disposal poeple. There are lots of bottle banks everywhere and we have a local garden disposal place. Four times a year there is a collection for large objects. We have 2 rubbish, 1 glass and 1 cardboard etc collection a week.

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    i try and do as much as i can to help the environment. our local recycling facilities are pretty poor, so i pay extra to subscribe to a recycling co-operative. i pay them to collect our rubbish and they recycle almost everything. they use an electric vehicle for the collections to reduce pollution and petrol usage. i try not to buy things with much packaging, always reuse carrier bags when i go shopping etc. i buy lots of second hand things and if i need to buy new things i try to buy those made from recycled material.

    i only buy environmentally-friendly cleaning products, toiletries etc. as long as they're vegan too, which are quite easy to get 'cos as you say vegan often goes hand in hand with ecology.

    i use low energy light bulbs in every room of my house, turn every electrical thing off when it's not in use, and i'm thinking about signing up to a green electricity supplier, it'll cost a bit more but like the recycling i think it's worth it. i try not to waste water, and have a few water saving gadgets around the house. i also compost all my organic waste, i've tried growing my own veggies in my small garden but they've all died due to the bad weather and air pollution

    i don't have a car, so i always walk or use public transport. i don't fly any more, partly because i hate it and partly because of the impact on the enviroment.

    hmmm anything else...i think that's about it!

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    I admiree you and will use you as my role-model!


    I also recycle any carrier bags that I get and refuse them unless I need them to line my rubbish bin!!! Most o fmy shopping being done in organic shop- they only give bag son request anyway

  6. #6

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    This being a small campus located in a small town, I find myself in a car maybe once a week, and at that, always carpooling.

    There are recycling bins conveniently located in the breezeway on my floor in the res halls, so I figure, "I'm headed down that way to empty the trash can anyway, why not put papers in the paper bin and bottles in the plastics bin?" When I buy enough on a shopping trip to require a bag, I use that in the trashcan rather than purchasing a roll of trash bags, and whenever I can get away without needing a bag, I tell the cashier I don't need one.

    And it could be that we're just weird, but my roommate and I constantly forget that we *do* have a ceiling light in our room, so that's rarely used. She was raised without TV; I use my small set only to watch DVDs (and soon will be able to eliminate that tangled-cord-mess setup when my DVD rom-equipped laptop arrives).

    One of the big things that really gets me is that due to the way our student accounts are charged for printer usage, before the actual document comes out, the machine spits out sheet of paper with our network username all huge at the top and nothing else. Major waste, but I use them as scratch paper. Apart from that our campus is very pro-recycling; just the other day the dining halls handed out dry erase boards and mugs made of recycled plastic to discourage the use of paper for writing little notes, etc and the use of styrofoam cups. There were even recycling tips printed on these items.

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    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    I heard it mentioned elsewhere today that in Japan, after washing their hands in a public bathroom, many people carry a handkerchief to wipe their hands dry, rather than using paper towel. Infact, it was said that most public washrooms in Japan do not supply paper towels.

    I don't know how true it is - as I've never been to Japan. Anyway, I thought it was an excellent idea and I am going to start carrying a handkerchief to wipe my hands dry. Cutting down trees for paper towel seems quite stupid when I think about it in this context!

    Roxy

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    That's an excellent idea Roxy. I will definitely start doing that as well. It makes me mad when I'm in a public bathroom and someone uses like 10 paper towels to try their hands. WTF is that? I've oftened wondered how much electricity the blowers used, but it seems like the trend is switching back to paper towels. Now to find me a fancy handkerchief!

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    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    thats always a dilemma for me - to use the air blower or paper towels??
    both are wasteful of different resources.

    sometimes, i use a couple of extra squares of toilet paper (soft...and clean of course!) and just dab my hands with that and then flush it. i figure if i've used some paper originally, a couple of extra squares to flush is ok.

    either that or i just really shake my hands and wipe them on my jeans

  10. #10
    Kevster
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    If i have dark shorts or jeans then a little wipe of water doesn't hurt

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    Quote cedarblue
    thats always a dilemma for me - to use the air blower or paper towels??
    both are wasteful of different resources.

    either that or i just really shake my hands and wipe them on my jeans
    My dilemna exactly! So my solution is the that of wiping on my clothes too!!!!

  12. #12
    snivelingchild's Avatar
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    Default Eco-friendly Tips?

    I've been trying to be as environmentally conscious as possible lately. What things do you all do?
    I'm going to stop using paper towels and use only recycled paper products when I use them at all (like toilet paper). I'm ordering reusable mentrual pads and limits my energy usage. I'm recycling as much as possible and tyring to reduce the packaging on things I buy. I'm getting organic hemp shopping bags for groceries.
    One thing I'm stumped over is facial tissues. I barely use any as I'm never snotty anymore. I hate hankerchief's though. I have an ex-boyfirned who used one and it was disgusting. I think I've settled on just washing with water after sneezing.

  13. #13

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    You know, this is a great idea for a thread, because some of us may do some things that others haven't thought of. It'll be awesome if we could all get more ideas!

    I am very similar to you. I recycle plastic, glass, paper bags (from the grocery store), and cardboard. Unfortunately, I don't have anywhere that I know of where I can recycle paper (copy paper), and if anyone has ideas, please let me have it!

    I use Gladrags, but I still sometimes use tampons.

    I buy organic whenever possible, probably 95%.

    I have to drive a lot sometimes for my job, and as of yet, I haven't done anything to lessen those effects, but one day, I will get a hybrid vehicle!!

    I buy unbleached, partially recycled toilet paper, paper towels, and parchment paper.

    I use environmentally-friendly cleaners, such as dish soap, laundry detergent, and bathroom/household cleaners.

    I buy vegan cat food for my cat, although right now I am giving her 50% vegan and 50% cruel prescription food, as she has UT problems.

    Whenever I find it suitable, I tell people of the effects of factory farming and pesticide use.

  14. #14

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    Oh, yeah, I buy recycled toothbrushes.

    I bought trees as memorial gifts from www.treesforlife.org and will now only buy recycled jewelry, and some of the Christmas gifts I send will be made from recycled glass.

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    I buy recycled toothbrushes with the heads that can be popped on and off to reduce waste, recycled razors for myself.

    I used baking soda as a cleanser often, it's great for gettting rid of stains and grime. Use environmentally-friendly/vegan household cleansers (love Dr. Bronners) and laundry detergent.

    I would LOOOOVE for the babies to only wear organic cotton but it is so expensive, no way can afford it. Also wish we could use regular diapers but not enough time or space (no washing machine or dryer) so they wear non-chlorine bleach, wood pulp based disposable diapers and non-alcohol based baby wipes made with aloe vera. Organic, vegan baby wash and shampoo as well. No OTC's for them, homeopathic teething gel and colic remedy (when they were teeny), tea tree oil in a humidifier for their first colds).

    Cat eats dead animal but use PetGuard which allegedly does not tests on animals and uses no by-products.

    We recycle EVERYTHING. Actually, it is mandatory here which is fantastic. Our apartment complex has separate bins for regular trash, paper and aluminum/glass/plastic.

    I would LOVE not to have to drive so far for my job (40 miles a day+) but am stuck with it right now. As hybrids become better-designed and we get some money (should only take a few years), that would be my car of choice.

    What we don't do for the environment: still use regular toilet roll (husband loves one brand), don't recycle the cat food cans because the smell grosses both of us out, drive too much, too much plastics between household items and baby toys, need kinder lighbulbs but they are a bit pricey and the list goes on ...

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    snivelingchild's Avatar
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    Are you talking about light bulbs that last longer? If so, they actally save you money.

    It's great that you're apartment complex is like that. The nearest recycling center here is 100 miles away!!!

  17. #17

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    Yeah, I used to only have to drive 3 minutes to recycle everything (except copy paper), and now I have to drive about 15 min. each way. It sucks.

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    Yeah. Well, today I had to throw away 8 phone books, bags of perfectly recyclable paper, and tons of recyclable plastic!! Even the one 100 miles away doesn't take glass!

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    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    We use recycled toilet paper and paper towel (use minimal paper towel).

    We also recycle all of our drink containers (our apartment building doesn't provide recycling bins - we have to take them in ourselves). There is no where around here that takes paper or cardboard. A while ago, I started a recycling program at work (because we go through heaps of water and pop bottles there).

    We use environmentally friendly cleaners such as Seventh Generation.

    I buy from an organic grocery store (only place where I can really be assured of getting organic) but it is 20km away However, because of the distance I try to only go over there once every 10-14 days.

    We use environmentally friendly/cruelty free personal care products.

    When I'm not working at night, I try to walk to work as much as possible.

    Still though - I feel like there is still a lot that I can do to lessen my impact on the environment. Next on my list is to give those new light bulbs a go

  20. #20
    snivelingchild's Avatar
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    Also, turning unplugging appliances when not in use is good. I'm trying to do that more. I just sold my TV, but if I get a new one, I'll hook it up to a switch that plugs into the wall to turn the power to it on and off, so I won't have to reach behind the TV everytime.
    I keep the fridge and freezer down to the lowest temperatures. From now on, at present giving occations, I'm going to ask for eco-friendly things, including gift certificates for online organic cotton and hemp clothing free trade stores.
    I also use old water bottles and fill them with self filtered water.

  21. #21
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    Quote snivelingchild
    I've been trying to be as environmentally conscious as possible lately. ... One thing I'm stumped over is facial tissues. I barely use any as I'm never snotty anymore. I hate hankerchieves though. I have an ex-boyfriend who used one and it was disgusting. I think I've settled on just washing with water after sneezing.
    Like all of you, I try to recycle as much as poss. However, sniveling child, in my view if you're not using tissues, then a hanky is important. If you sneeze or cough without covering your mouth and nose with a large hanky, you're spreading millions of microbes around the place. It's rather annoying when talking with people in a room, and somebody sneezes without covering up. In fact recently I was in a meditation room, and someone had a cough or cold, and kept coughing out aloud without covering. I don't suppose there's anyone on this forum who lived through WWII, but at school and in work, there were notices that said 'coughs and sneezes spread diseases'. I guess that stayed with me!
    Eve

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    snivelingchild's Avatar
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    Well I always cover with my hands, then wash. I don't know about you, but I've rarely been able to grab a tissue in the .1 seconds before I sneeze.

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    We use recycled TP and buy paper towel where you can "choose the size", so you're not pulling a huge sheet off for wiping your mouth during dinner. I'm thinking of buying some washable napkins, but that's for partly selfish reasons. (I bought some embriodery patterns and I need something to put them on! )

    Our city has a curbside recycling program, so we recycle newpapers, glass, plastic, and cans. At work, I throw all my paper in a cardboard box and take it to the baler when it's full. The bales are recycled.

    I still have a lot of cleaners from before-vegan, but Trader Joe's makes it so affordable to buy enviro-friendly products that I will be able to replace them as they run out.

    I also have lots of pre-vegan lotions and perfumes. I threw some of them out, and kept just the ones that I use a frequently. When they run out, I will buy vegan. My makeup is all vegan. (mascara, powder, and chapstick)

    I drive to work (it's 45 minutes away!), but I may have a new job closer to home that I can bike to during warm months.
    -JK

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    anyone who is thinking about using energy-saving light bulbs, i can definitely recommend them. i've changed over all my household light bulbs, and they may be a bit more expensive in the short-term, but they save you so much more money over the life of the bulb.

    i recycle everything possible, but the council only collect newspaper from the kerbside so i carry all my glass etc. to the bottle bank and pay a local recycling co-operative to take away things like plastic, which the council don't take at all. it doesn't cost me that much, and i think it's worth it, but i'd be grateful if the council would give a tax discount for people who use the co-op, as it reduces the trash they have to collect

    i have a compost heap and don't use any chemicals on my garden, or in my home. i buy a fair amount of organic food. i always turn appliances off at the wall and have a go at my boyfriend if he leaves anything on standby i have my central heating on as low as possible, and heat only one room if i'm going to be staying in there. i'm considering signing up to a green electricity supplier, and i'd love to get solar panels installed on my house but that is an expense that is way out of my budget unfortunately

    i try not to buy new things, preferring second-hand stuff if possible, especially clothes. if i really need an item of clothing that i can't get second-hand, i try to buy organic cotton or hemp. other goods like toilet roll, kitchen roll, computer paper etc. i always buy recycled.

    i use biodegradable sanitary protection at the moment but i'm going to order some washable ones soon.

    i do not own a car and probably never will, as i like walking and i'm lucky enough to have a great bus system around where i live and work, any further afield and the trains aren't too bad either.

    there's probably other stuff but i can't think of anything else right now
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

  25. #25

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    I recycle aluminum, plastic, glass, cardboard and newspapers. No office paper recycling site nearby though I use some of the tons of paper I get in the mail and at meetings as scrap paper (the backs are blank). I'm in the process of setting up a bin at work for aluminum and plastic drink bottles. I requested recycled paper notebooks from management but so far haven't gotten them. I'm saving up to buy organic, fair trade bath towels to supplement what we now have. I mainly buy clothes from second hand shops. I buy about 50 percent organic food. I use Seventh Generation, Dr. Bronner's and similiar household and body products. I drive 30 minutes one way to work :-( I compost kitchen waste. I've started a tiny garden at my house. Just found out about a new organic farm nearby!!!
    Am planning on getting a pet door to the uninsulated laundry room where the litter box is. Right now we have to leave the door cracked. I wash clothes on cold. Try to only bathe every other day or every three days but that is hard!!! Plan to buy some of the "good" light bulbs.
    I think really long and hard before buying new stuff, try to reduce my wants.

  26. #26
    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    glass
    plastic
    ali foil
    paper
    cans
    batteries
    old foreign coins i find
    comp used ribbons
    old clothes
    wood
    uncompostable garden waste
    compost


    an animal sanctuary i support will take the coins and comp ribbons to raise money for themselves and the rest go into appropriate boxes at the city dump.


    also use the energy efficient bulbs and have put 1/2 a brick in my toilet cystern to reduce the amount of water used when flushing.

  27. #27
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    Quote cedarblue
    glass
    plastic
    ali foil
    paper
    cans
    batteries
    old foreign coins i find
    comp used ribbons
    old clothes
    wood
    uncompostable garden waste
    compost


    an animal sanctuary i support will take the coins and comp ribbons to raise money for themselves and the rest go into appropriate boxes at the city dump.
    CB, I have a jar of foreign coins, mostly useless European coins that are now useless. If it's not too expensive, would you like me to mail them to you? I can't find anywhere here that will take them .

  28. #28
    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    most decent of you my dear, if you still have my address!

    thank you on behalf of the hillside animal sanctuary

    or you could mail to them direct!

  29. #29
    Geoff
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    Does anyone know of a good cause that wants used postage stamps? I save them but can't find anyone in Oz who wants them.

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    One of our key 'green' activities is to always accept handme downs!

    We sort through them, size them, place them in the appropraite person's 'too big box', and the next time we need new clothes we go shopping in the box first. As we outgrow things we pass them on to other families with smaller children. I hate thinking about all the clothes in the landfill that people would love to have.
    We also cut up and recover usable material from hole filled jeans, etc. and make them into jean quilts for a local shelter.

    In terms of gardens, we accept all garden overload from all the neighbors. Zucchini, tomatoes, apples- we glean it all. When we lived in an apartment and had no garden space we let the word get out that we'd be available to weed and water peoples gardens in the neighborhood while they were on holidays. Our pay would be ripe produce for the time they were gone (it would be wasted otherwise anyway!) and then some of the crop later in the year. For a little well enjoyed time in the dirt we got great food!

    Now that we have lots of garden space we still get extras from others and it never goes to waste. If I actually have too much I'll make up a basket for sharing with any apartment dwellers I know, plus we participate in a 'grow a row program' for the local foodbank.

  31. #31
    ♥♥♥ Tigerlily's Avatar
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    In my province (I live in Canada) everyone recycles and composts. It's the law.

    I also walk a lot to my destinations because we are too small for public transport. I don't know about the efficient water and light bulbs....

    And this summer I plan on growing a garden!

  32. #32
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    What province are you in Tigerlily? I am in BC

  33. #33
    ♥♥♥ Tigerlily's Avatar
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    Pei.

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    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    Very far away from here lol.

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    wow Tigerlily it's actually the law that people must recycle and compost where you live? that's great. in the UK, even when recycling facilities are provided, there's no law saying people have to recycle. the government were thinking about bringing in an extra tax for people who produce more than a certain amount of trash, but i don't think they're going to do it now which is a shame. it seems like some people really need an incentive to get off their butts and do something.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

  36. #36
    ♥♥♥ Tigerlily's Avatar
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    Yep, they won't pick up your garbage if it isn't properly sorted. But there is a problem with illegal dumping on beaches and in fields. Shame, some people can't take the extra 3 seconds to figure out what's recycable, compost, or "waste"...

  37. #37

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    Wow, i can't believe you guys don't have home pick up of recyclables! I had no idea!

    Here (Ontario) it's not law, but we do have recycling pick up so we make very good use of it. Even though it comes out of our taxes, it is "free" to people insofar as the service is there without the cost of going to a recycling depot of some sort.

    We recycle everything we can. The city recently cut back on the plastics it will take, but we kept them in a bag downstairs anyway to take to my dad's place where they ARE accepted, and also tried to find substitute products in different packaging. Now the city has reinstated it for next fall, so we will hold onto it until then. We also compost. We have a composter in our back yard. We throw out very little trash. We have cotton bags that we carry our groceries in. We have the energy efficient bulbs (11 and 13W) bulbs all through our house. We have one car even though we could easily afford two, and Mr. meatless takes public transit to work-- he is only able to do so because we based our home buying decision heavily on where public transit is. Our one car is a honda civic. We take a product's origin into consideration when buying.

  38. #38
    PinkFluffyCloud
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    Our recycling facilities are not good here.
    What happens with old 'white goods' like fridges, in Canada?
    There is a problem with them here, but i think plans are being made to recycle them.

    I always use the energy saving light bulbs, but I don't know what to do with plastic (i.e bottles), and am terrible for boiling the kettle and forgetting to use the water, then re-boiling.

    I think just not buying things that I really don't need is very energy efficient, and economical!!

  39. #39
    Geoff
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    What's happening with recycling in Brisbane:
    http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/BCC:S...021:pc=PC_1268

  40. #40

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    i'm always eco-conscious even though i can't always help using styrofoam plates and unrecycled toilet paper because i live with my fiance's parents. but things i can control like water and light i use very sparingly and am always aware of waste (or lack thereof ). i don't drive and i don't plan to until i get a hybrid car! so until then i always ride with my fiance when there's other errands that need to be taken care of. we're also going to be planting an organic garden-i can't wait!
    the one big downside is that i don't think there are any recycling centers in my area! i just moved here so i'm unsure, but definatley am going to find out.
    i also save and reuse things.

  41. #41
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    Quote Geoff
    What's happening with recycling in Brisbane:
    http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/BCC:S...021:pc=PC_1268
    Vancouver and the lower mainland here in BC have a lot to learn from the Brisbane City Council! I live in apartment building and feel very ripped off, that we don't have any recycling bins at all! The council don't supply them.

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    oh i forgot something else we do.

    We rarely use our dryer, instead, we hang all our clothes to dry on clotheslines we have strung through our basement, and we use an all-natural, enviromentally friendly laundry soap.

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    Quote PinkFluffyCloud
    Our recycling facilities are not good here.
    What happens with old 'white goods' like fridges, in Canada?
    There is a problem with them here, but i think plans are being made to recycle them.

    I always use the energy saving light bulbs, but I don't know what to do with plastic (i.e bottles), and am terrible for boiling the kettle and forgetting to use the water, then re-boiling.

    I think just not buying things that I really don't need is very energy efficient, and economical!!

    There's some special method they use to empty all the fluids out, and i think they try to recycle some of the materials.

    We recently replaced our 20 year old fridge (came with our house) with a brand new one that uses 1/3 of the energy!! We tried to give the fridge away but the person who was going to take it backed out at the last minute so we had to have the store take the fridge away and do the environmental thing they have to do by law.

  44. #44

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    Quote Artichoke47

    I am very similar to you. I recycle plastic, glass, paper bags (from the grocery store), and cardboard. Unfortunately, I don't have anywhere that I know of where I can recycle paper (copy paper), and if anyone has ideas, please let me have it!
    Hi artichoke47

    I dont know if you live in a town or what, but if you live rural there are a couple of thing you can do with paper if you dont have a recycle point.

    First, if you compost, paper can be added as an ingredient as long as it is shredded etc or rolled up to provide air pockets in the heap which helps accelerate the composting process. Propabably the best way to recyle is composting, putting back into the earth the stuff we use.

    Next, if you have a wood burner or range, you can burn paper after processing it into fire logs. Paper burning has neutral status when considering carbon burning etc. It obviously cuts down on fuel bills, whether using fossil fuels like coal, or using main supply which more than likely comes from burning power stations which use coal or oil or nuclear.
    Making a fire log isnt so hard. Get an old discarded large oil drum or similar and throw your torn or shredded paper into it filled with water and let it soak and get all mushy. Leave it for days. Next, remove the material and squueze the water from it. Best to use a make shift mould or you can buy a paper brick maker. Leave your bricks to dry out and use in the burner.

    There are also a few fun things you can use paper for in the home, like making a draught insulator with old nylons and shredded paper to keep those draughts coming in at winter beneath the door. An old sock would be more adventorous and maybe stitch a face onto it or something..the kids can join in if applicable to have a bit of fun.

    Paper mache is also something that we can do as a way of utilising paper rather than getting it landfilled or incinerated.

    Some of these things, I know wont be everybody's cup of tea, but better that than letting the authorities deal with it. It will only be burnt or landfilled.
    That goverment is best which governs not at all. Thoreau

  45. #45
    PinkFluffyCloud
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    I am a bit 'funny' about recycling newspapers, they are turned into bedding for Racehorses (other Horses, too, but mostly Racehorses).

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    Quote PinkFluffyCloud
    I am a bit 'funny' about recycling newspapers, they are turned into bedding for Racehorses (other Horses, too, but mostly Racehorses).

    Hi PFC

    I didnt know that!

    Where abouts in England are you? I was in Bath in the summer for a week and I found the best Vegan restaurant ever! Cant remember the name of it, though. Still, superb!!!
    That goverment is best which governs not at all. Thoreau

  47. #47
    PinkFluffyCloud
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    Actually, Celtic, I'm not too far from you - near Holyhead!!

  48. #48
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    Quote PinkFluffyCloud
    I am a bit 'funny' about recycling newspapers, they are turned into bedding for Racehorses (other Horses, too, but mostly Racehorses).
    i'd never heard that either PFC, and i'm not doubting you, but i believe a high proportion of recycled newspaper goes into making more newspapers. most newspapers these days are at least 50% recycled paper (i work in the newspaper industry )
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

  49. #49
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    That is good news, Gorilla!
    Maybe things have changed these days?
    I wonder what papers are used for the horse bedding now?
    I feel better about recycling mine now, thanks!!

  50. #50

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    Quote PinkFluffyCloud
    I wonder what papers are used for the horse bedding now?
    Perhaps, the 'Racing Post'?

    Holyhead, only a short swim away. Bit cold today though
    That goverment is best which governs not at all. Thoreau

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