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Thread: Poor vegan, cheap living

  1. #51
    PinkFluffyCloud
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    Ooh, Kevster, I never iron, either, just give things a shake and hang them up in a warm place.

  2. #52
    Cloudy's Avatar
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    Quote cedarblue
    whaaaaaat???
    what cereal do you have kev?
    Well, he says cereal, I think he means straw
    I bet Yoda was a vegan

  3. #53
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    I've met mr kevster, and I can beleive he puts water on cereal.

  4. #54
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    Muesli is preferable.

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    Quote feline01
    What's tinea?
    I believe it is also known as atheletes foot? It is a fungal nail/skin infection. Pretty itchy and gross

  6. #56
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    People piss in public pools. Ugh!

  7. #57

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    Yuk - I hate public pools. They are soooooooo diseased and full of grotty germs People can be so gross. And in the toilets, you always see old grandmas with their wrinkly boobs sagging down to their waistlines

  8. #58
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    Plus the chlorine turns my hair green. I guess they need that much chlorine to kill the germs. I don't blame Eve for not wanting to put her face in the water!

  9. #59
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    Quote Banana
    Yuk - I hate public pools. They are soooooooo diseased and full of grotty germs People can be so gross. And in the toilets, you always see old grandmas with their wrinkly boobs sagging down to their waistlines
    I go to two public pools, and they are both absolutely spotless. Of course there are chemicals, but unlike the old-style that used to bring tears to ones eyes from the chlorine, it is different now. However, I do go at 6am when there are only a few of us, up to 6 or 8. Once crowds come, I'm off, and I certainly never swim with other people's kids. Don't trust them not to wee.

    As for old grandmas, well I'm an old grandma, but my boobs are neither saggy nor wrinkly, but firm and apparently attractive. I'd line them up with yours any time!
    Eve

  10. #60
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    Eve, you kill me!! Who has been inspecting your attractive boobs?????????????

  11. #61
    I eve's Avatar
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    I overhear comments from the guys!
    Eve

  12. #62
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    A likely story!

  13. #63
    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    you have us all intrigued eve! hmmmmm...you're not thinking of doing a 'geoff' are you??????????????


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    This is a UK based site, but there are some good ideas for everyone, no matter where you are from.

    There are some good vegan recipes too

    http://www.frugal.org.uk/

  15. #65
    I eve's Avatar
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    I like your new avatar cedarblue, though I liked the previous one too! But what do you mean, 'doing a geoff'? What's he been up to lately?

    Libby, I like the Frugal Living, thank you.
    Eve

  16. #66
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
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    Eve you crack me up! I hope my boobs are firm and ripe when I get to be of "grandma" age.

  17. #67
    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    Quote eve
    I like your new avatar cedarblue, though I liked the previous one too! But what do you mean, 'doing a geoff'? What's he been up to lately?

    Libby, I like the Frugal Living, thank you.



    eve, check out the members list and go to geoffs name, you'll see what i mean

  18. #68
    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    oh poop, its gone now!

    ne'er mind, it was 'cheeky' though

  19. #69
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    Geoff was demonstrating how to live cheaply in the clothing department...

    Another tip,

    Shaving your hair, saves on the hairdresser, saves on lots of shampoo and conditioner, don't have to be concerned about 'whether my hair is looking good today'. Don't block up the plug hole. Don't need to use a hairdryer, thus saving on electricity... the list i am sure is endless.

  20. #70
    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    when my towels look a bit threadbare i just wash them and take them to my local vets, they're always pleased to take them.

    carrier bags double up as bin liners.

    if you like your washing to smell nice, drop about 4/5 drops of an essential oil into the fabric softener section of washing maching before washing, it gives the washing a fresh smell and if you use lavender, lemon, orange or grapefruit it acts as a mild antiseptic too.

  21. #71
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    I just made a baby toy today. Took an empty plastic spring water bottle, washed and dried it and added some beans then tightly capped it. The babies love rolling it around and shaking it. That certainly is cheap entertainment for the kids.

  22. #72
    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    Quote Kevster
    Shaving your hair, saves on the hairdresser, saves on lots of shampoo and conditioner, don't have to be concerned about 'whether my hair is looking good today'. Don't block up the plug hole. Don't need to use a hairdryer, thus saving on electricity... the list i am sure is endless.
    good points Kev, although i'm not about to shave all my hair off i never use a hair dryer though i always let my hair dry naturally (also because hair dryers blast your brain with electromagnetic radiation, so i'm told). i also never go to the hairdressers, because i have long straight hair i can just get the ends trimmed by a friend and don't need to use any styling products.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

  23. #73
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    Quote feline01
    I just made a baby toy today. Took an empty plastic spring water bottle, washed and dried it and added some beans then tightly capped it. The babies love rolling it around and shaking it. That certainly is cheap entertainment for the kids.


    For a moment I thought you said you had made a 'baby boy' today!!!

    I used to make toys like that all the time, Feline! I also used to buy a lot of baby clothes from the second hand shops.

  24. #74
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
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    lol thats what i thought too pfc.

    i too reuse plastic grocery bags and use them all the time. i also never use a blowdryer, and let my hair dry naturally. ive never found a reason not to.
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  25. #75
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    Quote PinkFluffyCloud
    For a moment I thought you said you had made a 'baby boy' today!!!

    I used to make toys like that all the time, Feline! I also used to buy a lot of baby clothes from the second hand shops.
    One baby boy is enough .

    I've been fortunate, friends have been giving us loads of hand-me-down clothes from their kids so we haven't had to buy too much. Even my friend in Italy brought a bag of used boy's clothes from her friend when she flew to the US a few months ago. What we haven't been given, I've bought on sale-never paid full price for any of their clothing.

  26. #76
    cedartree cedarblue's Avatar
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    i also subscribe to care 2 and send e-cards. it saves on buying cards, envelopes, stamps etc.

    i enjoy looking through their whole site.

  27. #77
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    Oh, that's another thing I do, Cedar, just google 'free e-cards' and you have tons of choice. Try www.free-e-cards-online.com, you can make your own with accompanying music, too!

  28. #78

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    I make my own home made cards out of all sorts of stuff, from scraps of fabric, wool (acrylic), paper, plastic and food packaging. Anything that you find and you have no use for. It can takes a little artistic skill and imagination but I even sell some of mine in a shop.

    I also rap presents up in paper from magazines, not like I ever buy any but someone I live with always seems to be recycling some.

    Most presents come from a charity shop or I make them myself.

    Making my own clothes can be very demanding on time and can turn out to be more expensive but I always knit my own scarves
    Isn't it great how all this trying to save money is also saving the planet!

    I also save some of my glass jars from the recycle box for storing things and I also use margarine/icecream tubs for the same reason. On an enviromental note I also take any extra plastic tubs to uni for textile students to mix there dyes in, i would perfure to recyle them but I can't find a place to take them)

  29. #79
    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    i use old margarine tubs, soya ice cream tubs etc. that i can't recycle as storage tubs for nuts, seeds, dried fruit and taking sandwiches to work and so on. saves money on buying plastic containers.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

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    That is good for the environment too Gorilla

  31. #81
    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    yeah it's interesting how a lot of people think doing things for the environment is expensive, but a lot of things actually *save* you money.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

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    I bought a whole lot of those green bag things from the supermarket when they first came out - they were $1 each and I bought around 20 - but they are very practical, can fit lots of stuff in them. $20 is a small price to pay to reduce wastage, like non-biodegradable plastic bags - although when I forget my green bags, I always use them as bins.

  33. #83
    drummer
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    Cook every day of the week using fresh and unprocessed ingredeints...
    That's hilarious feline, although I am lazy so I do the same thing.....Is this a Brit thing??
    Use natural cleaning products to clean things like white vinegar, lemon juice and boiling water...

  34. #84
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    I don't buy bin liners (trash bags) and just use the bags from the grocery instead.

    I also rewear my clothes and don't iron (although i never thought that was saving the earth to not iron, i'll have to use that one at work)

    I also reuse cups. i get one for the day and rinse it between soymilk, juice, water, etc. instead of running the dishwasher. I keep one for water at nights and wash it every couple days or once a week.

    i wash clothes by hand to save money.

    i have to have a car (live in the US) but i have a very fuel efficent one - about 45 miles to the gallon.

    I keep my gas tank half full and shop around for the cheapest gas. this also helps with fuel economy (car weighs less with less gas, gets better mileage)

  35. #85
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    Quote Banana
    I bought a whole lot of those green bag things from the supermarket when they first came out - they were $1 each and I bought around 20 - but they are very practical, can fit lots of stuff in them. $20 is a small price to pay to reduce wastage, like non-biodegradable plastic bags - although when I forget my green bags, I always use them as bins.
    I love my canvas shopping totes. I bought a bunch for $2 each and keep them in the car for shopping. I hate those plastic carrier bags though if I do get them, I reuse them. Plus, many stores give a minimal discount if you're using your own bags (maybe 2 cents a bag).

  36. #86
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    Coupons!

    The other day while at the supermarket with my dad, I found a big pile of these booklets by an empty cash register. They said Save Money The Natural Way. I thought it was a little info booklet on how to save energy and blah blah blah. NO WAY! It was filled with coupons for different soy and rice milks, vitamins and supplements, natural hair and body prodcuts, and juice and cereal. Hehhe, I'm so going to use them next time I go shopping.

  37. #87
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    I like taters! Is that healthy though? My mom tells me that potatos are a starchy food and she be eatin in moderation.

    Quote cwih57
    I save by making Potatos a staple, you can buy 20 pounds of potatos for less than five dollars, I eat them with every meal. I also rewear clothes, I smell them and if they don't stink I wear them, if they do stink I spray them with downy wrinkle releasor and they are almost always good to go.

  38. #88

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    millet is super cheap (here it's like 80 cents a pound), and lasts a while. it's best to cook it with veggie broth (thats cheaper if you make your own).

  39. #89
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    Default Re: The Cheap Thread

    Pollux does most of his vegan shopping at walmart


    AWW SHIT WHATZ UP FOOL

  40. #90
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    Default Re: The Cheap Thread

    Wow - Walmart sells vegan things?

    They exploit everything else under the sun, so I would've expected that they would be very generous with their animal exploitation as well.

    I hate Walmart.

  41. #91

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    Default Re: The Cheap Thread

    My friend gave me 2 bags of clothes she's lost too much weight to wear at the weekend!

    I haven't had clothes from a friend that way for years, but we (a large group of my friends) used to swap and donate clothes to each other all the time - it's great for refreshing your wardrobe and getting better use out of clothes...I had some great stuff that could be 3rd or 4th hand when I got it and then would last 5-6 years...

    On a similar note, I'm a bit depressed at the mo because the final bits of clothing I bought with my first money on leaving home (summer job and grant cheque (and that should tell anyone who's English how long ago this was)anyone) are disintegrating...clothes hardly last any time anymore...what's a decade between friends!

  42. #92
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
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    Thumbs up healthy but cheap foods?

    ive already gotten some good tips on this, but id like everyones.

    what do you find are the cheapest but healthiest things to purchase. i dont have any money right now and would like to know what things are healthy but cheap, and thought this would make a good thread for other people aswell.

    basically, how to get the best bang for you buck regarding vegan food. lol!

    thanx!
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  43. #93
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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    bulk nuts, fruits and veggies (fresh and on sale...for instance, all the greens at my local store are $.50 a bunch and strawberies are $1.99 for a flat! Also Texas peaches are $.89 a pound.
    I know it doesn't help you but it may help others: find a bread outlet store for cheaper bread...it's on closeout and you have to eat it quickly but I eat a lot of bread with earth balance, toast and such
    bulk rices, flours, beans ect. even just dried store brand beasns are super cheap. I got red and brown lentils 2 for $1

    ~Mel
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  44. #94
    ConsciousCuisine
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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    I have no idea what things cost in Canada, but here is what a teen/young adult needs to be eating some of daily/weekly, if no allergies are present:

    legumes, beans etc. (lentils, pinto beans, black beans, chickpeas etc.)

    vegetables (collard greens, kale, chard, broccoli, cauliflower, beets, spinach, arugula, tomatoes, onions, garlic, carrots, squash, sweet potatoes, mixed baby greens)

    fruits (berries and citrus are your best bets!)

    seeds and nuts (ground flax, sesame, pumpkin, sunflower, walnuts, almonds)

    whole grains (brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa)

    healthy oils (unheated flax, sesame, olive etc.)

    Nutritional Yeast

    B-12, calcium, iron and zinc rich foods and/or a supplement

  45. #95
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    mmm i love those veggies, and berries and citrus are my favorite fruits

    thanx!
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  46. #96
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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    CC said it the best so I can't really add to that except to say watch the sales, use coupons when you can and buy items in season. Don't be afraid to explore the frozen foods section for veggies / fruit and the bulk foods section is your friend in many ways. Pre-made things will almost always run up the bill and so will a lot of specialty items (vegan butter, cheese, sourcream, etc). It's best to spend that money for more useful items such as olive oil, nutritional yeast and B12 supplements or a good multi.
    It's vegan, which means it's vegetarian which means there's nothing unheathy in it. -- my guy trying to explain vegan junkfood.

  47. #97
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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    As already mentioned, dried lentils, beans and peas are incredibly cheap. You need to remember to soak them overnight or for a few hours (apart from lentils which don't need it) and then cook them thoroughly (boil beans hard for at least 10 minutes and then simmer until tender) - but if you have access to a freezer, you can prepare a large quantity and freeze what you don't need.

    Mix them with whatever vegetables are cheap on the day you go shopping and you will have a filling stew or soup for next to nothing. Cold cooked lentils or beans are also a good basis for a nourishing salad. Throw in a few herbs and spices if you have them to make your meals tastier.

  48. #98

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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    How about making your own soups from fresh ingredients? It's much cheaper & healthier than buying tinned stuff and you can make up several large meals in one go.

  49. #99
    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    on a similar note to what Mel said - you may find that if you visit a shop near closing time they'll have perishable food like fruit and veg near their sell-by date reduced in price. if you use them the day you buy them they'll still have plenty of nutrients. last week my local wholefood shop had a huge box of organic cherries and broccoli that they were giving away for free because they were slightly over-ripe.

    have you tried sprouting your own beans/pulses? they're really healthy, you can buy the dried beans in bulk and if you sprout them yourself they're much cheaper than buying them from a shop.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

  50. #100
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
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    Default Re: healthy but cheap foods?

    thanx for all your tips everyone

    gorilla, no i havent tried sprouting but i would like to!

    cc, i know frying isnt a very healthy way to prepare food, but i was wondering if i were to make chinese fried rice, which would be just brown rice, lots of veggies (usually a combination of broccoli, peas and/or tomatoes), organic tamari, garlic powder, nutritional yeast, pepper, sesame seeds, and a little olive oil, would that still be healthy? i fry it for about 3 minutes. u mentioned alot of those foods and chinese fried rice is one of my favorites!
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

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