Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 51 to 100 of 199

Thread: The cost of healthy food

  1. #51
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    I have definitely noticed that stores like Whole Foods/Trader Joe's/Wild Oats have a large percentage of affluent-appearing shoppers. That does not mean they are veg*ns, just yuppies looking for the lastest trend. But I understand your point, Hasha. Some things are more expensive like supplements and organic fruit and veg and if one is poor, those types of items would be unattainable. I work in an inner-city environment for welfare and though there are 2 grocery stores and 1 small health food store, many items that a vegan would use are not easily located and/or purchased using food stamps. None of my clients have a computer, most don't even have telephones so ordering things online would be a challenge plus mail is often stolen.

    Veganism can be viewed as a luxury of the middle-class/wealthy in some areas of the world such as where I work but in other areas, it can be the norm. A poor vegan who has a plot of land can grow their own food and the veggies would probably have a reliable source of B-12. Calcium could be obtained from greens. Protein from beans and nuts depending on where one lived. One could be vegan and live fairly peacefully if such an environment was available. As eve noted, the more simply one lives, the easier it would be to be vegan.

    Ok, this was really rambling, I hope you understood what I was trying to say. Basically, I see both sides are possible.

  2. #52
    snivelingchild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Lafayette, Louisiana, United S
    Posts
    1,022

    Default

    Just to expand, look at the foods someone might eat if they couldn't afford their own and got donated canned food. This usually consists of beans, peas, green beans, etc. If they can afford to buy cheap food, a stable is ramen noodles, which are vegan except for the flavoring. Rice is another cheap stable.

  3. #53
    PinkFluffyCloud
    Guest

    Default

    I think it can be a luxury - if you want it to be!
    When I was first vegan, I lived on £40 dole money per week, and I used to drink in those days, at least twice a week!
    These days, I spend money on lovely vegan treats when I can afford it (so not at the moment, then!), but, having spent more money on things, I make them last, so I don't think it really works out more expensive.

  4. #54
    John's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    NJ USA
    Posts
    714

    Default

    Don't be fooled. There are plenty of poor veg*ns. There are people who would like you to think that compassion for animals is the domain of the bourgeois, but that's just anti-liberal propaganda. Yes, it can be challenging for poor people to be strict vegans but isn't that the nature of being poor? You have little control over your life when you don't have money.

    I am reminded of a time when I gave a man on the street two dollars so that he could buy a box of chicken nuggets to bring home to his children. In my mind I was thinking that he could feed his family for a couple of days if he bought beans instead. I didn't say that of course, since he was probably going to use the money to buy a pack of cigarettes anyway.

  5. #55
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    I'm certainly not middle-class/wealthy, in fact I live on a aged pension, and rent a Housing Commission 1-bedroom unit. However, I have no habits, such as smoking, drinking, gambling, drugs, etc, nor do I buy take-aways or any other junk. I live a simple life and still manage to buy the odd book, subscribe to a couple of good organisations, etc, and my membership of the gym and pool is an investment in my health. But with food, it is strictly conventional fruit & vegies from the cheapest stores, and I don't eat fancy tofus, just a block of ordinary tofu now and then, that I marinate to make tasty. I eat no sweets or desserts, apart from fruit and peanuts. I consider that my lifestyle is very healthy, and those of my friends who are a similar age to me, wonder why I am so healthy! Most of them are forever shopping for, and eating, what I consider crap foods.
    Eve

  6. #56
    Eating Wildflower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    912

    Default

    What a great topic!

    The ability to pick and choose one's food is the ultimate privilege.

    I try to keep this in the forefront when I think of veganism and definately consider it to be a privilege that I can TURN AWAY certain foods. This in itself is wonderful.

    But veganism doesn't have to be pricey. Vegetables, rice, beans and tofu are some of the absolute cheapest things you can buy.

    Food is a NEED. Vegan donuts and some of the other items listed are LUXURIES.

  7. #57
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    I was thinking of this thread last night while giving the babies their baths. When I was pregnant, I bought organic, herbal, vegan shampoo, body wash and lotion. ALl 3 cost $8US. I"ve been using these same products for the last 8 months and will still get another month or so out of the bottle. Is it really that expensive to spend $8 for something that will last 9 months+. I guess if I only had one baby, the products would last well over a year. I think that is highly affordable and I am secure knowing that my babies are not being covered with chemical-laden, animal-tested, perfume-saturated products. Or the large bottle of Dr. Bronner's castille soap-cost $10 but I've been cleaning with it for over a year and a half.

    As several people have already noted, veganism does not have to be expensive. It can be if one chooses to but it is not inherently a more expensive lifestyle.

  8. #58
    PinkFluffyCloud
    Guest

    Default

    After reading Eve's comments I tried washing my hair with plain vegetable soap tonight, which I had always thought would leave my hair tangly and 'stringy'.
    I'm a convert!

  9. #59
    gothic_ana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    30

    Default

    u know we all have diffrent comforts and diffrents ways of living, that is what makes you unique.
    but the fun of being vegan is going on to the WWW and finding wholesalers to make our own stuff, its cheeper and you know whats in it.
    i have also been on the poorer side of things but u know what i am much happyer knowing that fair enough i aint rich but i still have a roof over my head and some food on the table and family who even though are s**t heads care every know and again.

    take care.
    If i cant kill it i WONT eat it, If i cant look into its eyes and hurt it, I wont take from it.

  10. #60
    gothic_ana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    30

    Default

    being vegan aint bout having richy things or being poor its about a lifestyle your comfortable with and the reasons why you became vegan otherwise you wouldnt be vegan to begin with.
    my man got mad cos somethings r expansive but if i make them it would b cheper in the LONG RUN.
    If i cant kill it i WONT eat it, If i cant look into its eyes and hurt it, I wont take from it.

  11. #61
    l337_v3g4n_1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    A land of Ice and snow. ICELAND!
    Posts
    144

    Default

    http://www.funlol.com/funpages/astheworldturns.html
    this is to remind you that you are not poor, even though it seems like it. Feel blessed that you even have something to eat, and a roof over your heads. Happy new years, and enjoy what you have!
    People once thought my mother is a nut, but I once thought a nut was my mother! :D

  12. #62
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    Another aspect of veganism that I think many vegans follow is the concept of multi-use items. Omnis often buy say toilet cleaner, floor cleaner, counter cleaner etc. while I buy Dr Bronners which does all of that or an oil blend that I use as a massage oil and for cradle cap. We might spend a bit more on an item but get much more useage from it.

  13. #63

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    At home
    Posts
    1,689

    Default

    Like Eve, I try to live quite simply - I make my own food from scratch, like from dried beans/legumes, brown rice, barley and fresh conventional fruits, vegetables and herbs. I buy supermarket brand plain instant oats, rice cakes,hummus, wholemeal bread, tomato sauce (ketchup) etc... We also keep natural peanut butter, sugar free jam and yeast extract spread.

    We (my boyfriend and I) snack on fruit, rice cakes (and for him peanuts and raisins and supermarket brand cookies) and dates or dried fruit. Like Eve, we don't buy desserts. I eat lots of dates instead, or frozen bananas or frozen berries. If I am out for dinner or it is a special occassion, I will get dessert out - usually sorbet I rarely buy convenience meals, besides baked beans (which are dirt cheap) and the odd veggie burger. I spend around $25 on good quality flaxseed oil, but that is really all.

    My boyfriend, who is an omnivore has adjusted well to this much cheaper style of eating, although he does also buy milk, cheese, cold cut meats and eggs

  14. #64
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    On my way to the gym today, I walked by a supermarket that advertised 4 dozen eggs for $1US. My first thought was "what sort of hormones have they pumped these chickens with in order for them to have so many eggs and what kind of conditions are they kept in?" I had a mental image of rows and rows of battery cages with these poor chicks incarcerated there and given horrible meds in order for them to produce more and more eggs until the poor chicks just die. Really freaked me out. But to others, that low cost is a blessing. The sad thing is that what they really think is a blessing is killing the environment, themselves, their children and all those millions of animals. Is it really worth that $1?

  15. #65
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,716

    Question how much do you spend monthly on groceries?

    out of curiosity (and wondering if i spend way too much!) how much money do you usually spend a month on vegan groceries?
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  16. #66
    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sussex, UK
    Posts
    3,925

    Default

    i don't really keep track of how much i spend on groceries so this is an educated guess. i suppose it's something like £85 - £100 a month for both myself and my boyfriend together. is that a lot?

    BTW i thought this might be useful for this thread if people don't know the current exchange rates in different countries: www.xe.net
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

  17. #67

    Default

    I buy mostly organic, rarely processed food and I spend about $600-800/month for one person.

  18. #68

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    St. Paul Minnesota
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Oh my goodness $600 to 800 a month!

    I spend around 150 dollars a month for me alone

  19. #69
    MzNatural's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    240

    Default

    I only buy organic. I spend about $300 monthly, hardly any processed foods for myself. I make my own breads, nut/soy milk and nut butters. I still have vegetables growing in the garden. It has been in the 60ís here in Maryland.

  20. #70
    PinkFluffyCloud
    Guest

    Default

    I estimate that I spend about £60 per week on general groceries for three people (all big eaters), including drinks and treats. A lot of it is Organic, which pushes up the cost.

  21. #71
    Melissa assilembob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Killeen, Tx. USA
    Posts
    265

    Default

    $400 or so a month...sometimes more, sometimes less.
    around $100 a week. That's just me.
    I buy lots of box rice dinners and canned soup as I work long hours and need portable food. (easier to take a box of rice and cook it when i can than lug a cooler!)

    PFC we spend about the same amount but mine is just for me!!!!! And I don't eat a lot

    ~Mel
    ~Mel

    "Sweet songs the youth, the wise, the meaning of all wisdom...to believe in the good in man" - Legend

  22. #72
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,716

    Default

    i spend ALOT on groceries, for three people. probably anywhere from 600-1000 dollars a month :S
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  23. #73
    PinkFluffyCloud
    Guest

    Default

    Assilemob, I only included what I spend on food and drink, I spend extra when I shop on things like animal foods, (feed for my animals, I mean! ), toiletries, etc.
    I also try to make huge vats of Soup, etc, which is cheap nourishment.

  24. #74
    ♥♥♥ Tigerlily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Atlantic Canada
    Posts
    3,920

    Default

    I know my mom spends over $100 Canadian a week buy groceries for the whole family. A lot of it is non-vegan, of course, so I don't consume most of it anymore.

    I don't know how much I spend. I buy soy milk every week and sometimes my own veggies and odd food items...

  25. #75
    MzNatural's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    240

    Default

    Quote feline01
    On my way to the gym today, I walked by a supermarket that advertised 4 dozen eggs for $1US. My first thought was "what sort of hormones have they pumped these chickens with in order for them to have so many eggs and what kind of conditions are they kept in?" I had a mental image of rows and rows of battery cages with these poor chicks incarcerated there and given horrible meds in order for them to produce more and more eggs until the poor chicks just die. Really freaked me out. But to others, that low cost is a blessing. The sad thing is that what they really think is a blessing is killing the environment, themselves, their children and all those millions of animals. Is it really worth that $1?
    Unfortunately there are many that don't think of the reasons behind the low cost of animal products, and there are those who really don't care!

  26. #76
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    If I exclude baby food, I spend around $500-$600US for 2 adults. That includes bottled water which is what the entire family drinks including the cat and as much organic items as possible. My veggy purchases have increased recently because the organic farm I visit has very little due to it being winter. I still get lettuce, aragula, coriander from the greenhouse and some kale and collard greens from the fields but not even every week, depends on the sunlight.

  27. #77
    kriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    at home
    Posts
    768

    Default

    I get my dinners delivered weekly by a vegan food service. It's $70 for a 5 day supply and it's enough food for 2 people (3 big main dishes + 4 side dishes and 1 soup). I spend a lot more weekly, probably $130 alltogether. .. Oh, my dog, he is very cheap -only $20 a month!!
    "Animals are my friends... and I don't eat my friends". ~ George Bernhard Shaw.

  28. #78
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    You are right, MzNatural, but sadly when people are living below the poverty line, they can't be expected to think of reasonings behind cheap eggs, especially those who have never questioned anything. They certainly wouldn't be thinking of hormones pumped into the chickens, or the horrid sort of life those chooks had before they were slaughtered, and can we honestly expect people to spontaneously think of that themselves? I'm just recalling my own parents, when they were hard up, and they bought whatever was the cheapest items on the shelf of the grocer shop. With regards to those who consider that low prices are a blessing, well, isn't ignorance supposed to be bliss? Let us be thankful that we've left that ignorance behind.
    Eve

  29. #79
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    About $150(Aus)/month on groceries for myself.
    Eve

  30. #80
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    Quote kriz
    I get my dinners delivered weekly by a vegan food service. It's $70 for a 5 day supply and it's enough food for 2 people (3 big main dishes + 5 side dishes and 1 soup).
    I wish we had something like that here !

  31. #81

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    5

    Default I spend way too much!

    I probably spend over $100 US on just myself, but I always have so much extra stuff in my house that I really could go at at least a month without shopping at all. I just can't resist good sales. Like, right now, the grocery store at the end of my street has Cascadian Farms frozen veggies for $1 per package. I'm sure I'll go up and by $20 or $30 worth, which will last for months.

    The only things that I really ever buy processed are soymilk, vegan burgers & vegan hot dogs. I have a hard time making a good vegan burgers that don't fall apart on me and I'm not even going to attempt hot dogs. Other than that, I'm all about making my own ... it gives me control of the ingredients and I know exactly what's in it.

    Leah

  32. #82
    AR Activist Roxy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    4,977

    Default

    I spend about $500 - $600 per month. This is for me and half my boyfriend's food. He buys his own non-vegan food.

    BTW - my groceries include not just food, but also, household and personal care products.

    I buy organic (just about everything).

  33. #83

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    41

    Default

    I spend about £80 per week, but thats on pretty much everything (food for me and 2 small children, 2 dogs, 2 cats) inc. household stuff and toiletries.

    About once a month I spend £30 on mail order vegan goodies such as ice creams, fudge, yeast pate, tahini, vegan hotdogs/burgers etc - as I cannot get anything from supermarkets near me other than basic stuff.

  34. #84
    kriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    at home
    Posts
    768

    Default

    Feline,

    These guys are great! I get my food every tuesday on my doorstep, and all I have to do is to leave a check for them I got some meat eaters interested in their service too! I explain that the food can be in the fridge for many days before consumption because it's not meat. That usually settles the anxiety about the "weird vegan ideas." www.veginout.com
    "Animals are my friends... and I don't eat my friends". ~ George Bernhard Shaw.

  35. #85
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    Quote kriz
    Feline,

    These guys are great! I get my food every tuesday on my doorstep, and all I have to do is to leave a check for them I got some meat eaters interested in their service too! I explain that the food can be in the fridge for many days before consumption because it's not meat. That usually settles the anxiety about the "weird vegan ideas." www.veginout.com
    You CA vegans have all the luck . There was a woman in NJ who used to do that for NJ/NYC but she moved and she was very, very expensive.

  36. #86
    kriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    at home
    Posts
    768

    Default

    A good business for anyone interested starting something on their own. I think it would be very popular in other cities too.
    "Animals are my friends... and I don't eat my friends". ~ George Bernhard Shaw.

  37. #87
    feline01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    ?
    Posts
    874

    Default

    Quote kriz
    A good business for anyone interested starting something on their own. I think it would be very popular in other cities too.
    Wish I knew how to cook really well

  38. #88
    kriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    at home
    Posts
    768

    Default

    California vegans are lucky.
    "Animals are my friends... and I don't eat my friends". ~ George Bernhard Shaw.

  39. #89
    kriz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    at home
    Posts
    768

    Default

    More vegan business are needed.

  40. #90

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    At home
    Posts
    1,689

    Default

    Quote eve
    About $150(Aus)/month on groceries for myself.
    CRAP! I spend around $800 - $1000 per month for my boyfriend, Odi and myself - tell me your trick - You are a breatharian right????

  41. #91
    Michelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    AL, USA
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Quote MzNatural
    I only buy organic. I spend about $300 monthly, hardly any processed foods for myself. I make my own breads, nut/soy milk and nut butters. I still have vegetables growing in the garden. It has been in the 60ís here in Maryland.
    MzNatural...wow!! I'm impressed!! I was wondering if you know where Cumberland MD is...I have in-laws living there and we just visited for the holiday.

  42. #92
    Michelle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    AL, USA
    Posts
    73

    Default

    Quote kriz
    I get my dinners delivered weekly by a vegan food service. It's $70 for a 5 day supply and it's enough food for 2 people (3 big main dishes + 4 side dishes and 1 soup). I spend a lot more weekly, probably $130 alltogether. .. Oh, my whippet, he is very cheap -only $20 a month!!
    This sounds like my kind of deal!! You spend about the same as I do...and that includes having dinners delivered? Am I reading that right?


    Anyway...yeah...I spend about $125 per week for my husband and I and my toddler. I could do more or less, but that's about average.

  43. #93
    Leigh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    71

    Default

    I spend between $300 and $400 a month I guess. That's mostly just me, but my bf is over every weekend, so that feeds him too and it also includes the vegies I buy for my dogs. I don't really buy a lot of organic stuff though...

  44. #94
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    Quote Banana
    CRAP! I spend around $800 - $1000 per month for my boyfriend, Odi and myself - tell me your trick - You are a breatharian right????
    Hi Banana, no I'm not a breatharian, but I avoid health food stores like the plague, only going there once every 2 or 3 months to buy a pkt of Nutritional yeast flakes as they're not available anywhere else here. Rest of my groceries I buy at Woolworths, and don't buy anything I really can do without. I do buy peanuts at Woollies too, but mostly I eat fruit and veges. A loaf of Latvian rye bread lasts me a fortnight. I have fruit for brekkie, with a teaspoon of tahini on it and a dessertspoon of LSA, and moistened with Vitasoy. That doesn't cost much. Lunch time I whizz up some carrots and celery for a drink, and I add a dessertspoon of flaxseed oil, then a sandwich of homas, marmite, and tomatoes usually. I don't make an evening meal, but prefer to eat a bowl of peanuts, and sometimes have a mug of cocoa.
    Eve

  45. #95
    PinkFluffyCloud
    Guest

    Default

    Eve, you are an inspiration, I will try and follow the 'Eve Shopping Philosophy' and see how I go.

    I have started avoiding my nearest Health Food Shop. I used to buy Organic Sprouts there, but now grow my own. I order anything else on-line (which I can't get in 'mainstream' shops), to avoid temptation. I have stopped buying sweets and chocolates as I know I will just binge on them. I am washing everything, including my hair, with soap, now, after your suggestion, Eve. Thanks!

  46. #96
    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sussex, UK
    Posts
    3,925

    Default

    Eve, it's funny that Woolworths in Australia sell food, whereas here Woolworths shops in the UK sell toys, CDs, homewares and other junk like that.

    i buy all my dried wholefoods, e.g. lentils, beans, rice, nuts, dried fruit etc. from a shop in my local market which sells them by weight. they charge less if you bring your own containers to be refilled instead of them giving you a bag. it's all organic and really cheap - i can buy a couple of weeks' worth of these foods for less than £10. the rest of my money goes on fresh fruit and veg.

    i don't buy many processed foods and i make my own soya milk (except i can't at the moment because my machine needs repairing!) - that saves me loads of money as cartons cost between 65p and £1.45 depending on where you shop, and making your own costs about 8p. i grow my own herbs, i'm going to start growing my own sprouts and have another go at growing my own veg in my garden once the weather warms up a bit, hope i'll have more luck than my previous attempts!
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

  47. #97
    Goddess foxytina_69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,716

    Default

    eve, what kind of soap do u use?

    pfc, do u have any info on how to grow your own sprouts?
    "you dont have to be tall to see the moon" - african proverb

  48. #98
    I eve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    2,210

    Default

    I use vegano vanilla soap - the ingredients list palm oil, kernel oil, water, macadamia oil, sodium chloride (don't know what that is), and sodium oxide (ditto). The 'blurb' says it combines the fragrance of vanilla with the moisturising effect of macadamia oil in a mild vegetable based soap suitable for the whole family, and no animal testing or ingredients. The soaps were a gift from a NSW vegan.
    Eve

  49. #99
    Melissa assilembob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Killeen, Tx. USA
    Posts
    265

    Default

    you know...when i get behind people at the local grocery store who are lugging two carts of food, i see mostly refined carbs, fatty meats, eggs, cheeses and junk food. They spend roughly $200 on food. A lot of these people go shopping like my family did, every two weeks. That food lasts them 2 weeks. They buy the cheapest foods.
    When my best friend and I shop together (as in when he buys my groceries for me as he does often since I pay for other things) we spend areound $100 for both of us, and he buys that processed, fatty non-vegan food. I buy 90% produce with some convenience foods. He shops every two weeks. I go back each week (buying small things during if food spoils or if I decide I want something else) All together I spend around $100 a week on groceries just for me (that includes when he buys my stuff...!) I spend about the same amount on groceries for just one person that they do for four, sometimes more. It's frustrating to see someone be able to buy a huge family pack of meat for $5 and I spend that much or more on tomatos and lettuce. Produce is way to expensive. One day I was behind one of those families...they were all huge. They looked very unhealthy. I thankful for every day that I eat the way I do cause I have dropped a ton of weight. I would look like them. Spending that money may not be fair, but I think I will save on heart surgery later.

    ~Mel
    ~Mel

    "Sweet songs the youth, the wise, the meaning of all wisdom...to believe in the good in man" - Legend

  50. #100

    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    At home
    Posts
    1,689

    Default

    Yes Mel - I also buy mainly fresh produce items like fruit and veg, plus things like bread, cereal, rice, barley and dried beans, some dates and a couple of other staples (baked beans etc...) and we spend around $150 on food per week - that is for two of us. I work at the supermarket and see people all the time who spend $200 for a whole family and get a hell of lot more - but it is all crap like fish fingers, white bread and macaroni cheese packets. It is unfair but at least our arteries are not getting clogged

Similar Threads

  1. Let's get fit and healthy together (3)
    By smallhelen in forum VEGAN HEALTH
    Replies: 341
    Last Post: Sep 2nd, 2012, 07:18 PM
  2. Healthy/Low-Fat Vegan Food
    By ShariBlackVelvet in forum VEGAN FOOD
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Jan 15th, 2011, 06:14 PM
  3. Cost of leather going through the roof
    By Clueless Git in forum News
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Nov 25th, 2010, 01:23 PM

Tags for this thread (If you see one or more tags below, click on them if you're looking for similar threads!)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •