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Thread: Animal products and diabetes

  1. #101
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vegan diet found to markedly improve health of diabetes patients

    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  2. #102
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    Default Re: Diabetes and veganism

    Type of vegetarian diet, body weight, and prevalence of type 2 diabetes. PubMed, May 2009. (PMID: 19351712)
    The 5-unit BMI difference between vegans and nonvegetarians indicates a substantial potential of vegetarianism to protect against obesity. Increased conformity to vegetarian diets protected against risk of type 2 diabetes after lifestyle characteristics and BMI were taken into account. Pesco- and semi-vegetarian diets afforded intermediate protection.
    Vegetarian diets and incidence of diabetes in the Adventist Health Study-2. (PubMed, Oct. 2011. PMID: 21983060)
    Vegetarian diets (vegan, lacto ovo, semi-) were associated with a substantial and independent reduction in diabetes incidence. In Blacks the dimension of the protection associated with vegetarian diets was as great as the excess risk associated with Black ethnicity.
    A low-fat vegan diet and a conventional diabetes diet in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled, 74-wk clinical trial. (May 2009 , 19339401)
    BACKGROUND:
    Low-fat vegetarian and vegan diets are associated with weight loss, increased insulin sensitivity, and improved cardiovascular health.

    OBJECTIVE:
    We compared the effects of a low-fat vegan diet and conventional diabetes diet recommendations on glycemia, weight, and plasma lipids.

    [...]

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Both diets were associated with sustained reductions in weight and plasma lipid concentrations. In an analysis controlling for medication changes, a low-fat vegan diet appeared to improve glycemia and plasma lipids more than did conventional diabetes diet recommendations. Whether the observed differences provide clinical benefit for the macro- or microvascular complications of diabetes remains to be established. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00276939.

    Vegetarian diet, physical activity protect against diabetes in black population, study shows
    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releas...-vdp110311.php (Nov 2011. This research was funded in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health and by the School of Public Health at Loma Linda University.)

    LOMA LINDA, Calif. — New research shows that following a vegetarian diet and exercising at least three times a week significantly reduced the risk of diabetes in African Americans, who are twice as likely to be diagnosed with diabetes when compared to non-Hispanic whites.

    "These findings are encouraging for preventing type 2 diabetes in the black population, which is more susceptible to the disease than other populations," said Serena Tonstad, MD, a professor at Loma Linda University and lead author of the research, published in the October issue of Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases.

    In addition to being at a greater risk for developing diabetes, black persons in the U.S. are also more likely to suffer from diabetes-related complications, such as end-stage renal disease and lower-extremity amputations, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    "A vegetarian diet may be a way to counteract the increased diabetes risk for the black population," Dr. Tonstad said.

    Dr. Tonstad's research showed that, compared to non-vegetarian blacks, vegan blacks had a 70 percent reduced risk of diabetes, and lacto-ovo vegetarian blacks (those who consume dairy, but no meat) had a 53 percent reduced risk of diabetes. Dr. Tonstad said one explanation was the protection associated with foods typically consumed in higher amounts in a vegetarian diet. Fruits and vegetables have a high fiber content, which may contribute to a decreased occurrence of type 2 diabetes. In addition, whole grains and legumes (beans) have been shown to improve glycemic control and slow the rate of carbohydrate absorption and the risk of diabetes.

    The study also showed that black participants who exercised three or more times a week, compared to once a week or never, had a 35 percent reduced risk of diabetes.

    The findings used prospective data (following persons over time) of 7,172 black Seventh-day Adventists participating in Adventist Health Study-2. Adventists are a Protestant religious group that promotes vegetarianism and advocates abstinence from tobacco and alcohol, which results in less confounding (distortions) when studying associations between diet and disease. Participants were given a questionnaire that asked how often they consumed 130 foods and food groups. Participants were then categorized into a dietary category (vegan, lacto-ovo vegetarian, etc.) based on their responses.

    The study also analyzed data of 34,215 non-black Adventists and found similar protections against diabetes for a vegetarian diet. These findings confirm results from past cross-sectional research (examining persons at one point in time) that showed a vegetarian diet offered protection against diabetes.
    From PCRM (July 2011):

    Avoiding Cow’s Milk May Cut Risk of Type 1 Diabetes
    Children who are not exposed to cow's milk proteins during infancy may have less risk of developing type 1 diabetes, according to a new report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In the Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) study, women were encouraged to breastfeed. Those who then transitioned their infants to baby formula were given a specially prepared formula in which proteins were broken up so that no intact cow's milk proteins remained. The full study results are not yet in. However, the TRIGR pilot study, including 230 infants followed until about 10 years of age, showed that those who followed the special feeding plan were 60 percent less likely to develop type 1 diabetes, compared with children who drank regular cow's milk formula during infancy.
    The study adds more support to the long-held theory that cow's milk proteins trigger the production of antibodies that can destroy a child's insulin-producing cells.
    Knip M, Virtanen SM, Becker D, Dupré J, Krischer JP, Akerblom HK. Early feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes: experiences from the Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR). Am J Clin Nutr. Published ahead of print Jun 8, 2011.
    From Plant-based diet loaded with health benefits:
    Dr. Barnard spoke about Plant-Based Diets for Diabetes Management and in his second presentation, Emotional Eating and the Science of Addiction.

    When speaking on diabetes, he reminded those present that carbohydrates are not the cause of diabetes, and though genes do play a roll in the disease, they are not “dictators” but “suggestors” that you might get the disease. You can fight back.

    “Don’t step back from the truth,” he said, as he showed how the U.S. per capita intake of meat, chicken, cheese and sugar have increased over the past 100 years and the increased prevalence of diabetes over the past 14 years.

    He showed results of studies he had conducted, funded by the Diabetes Action Research and Education Foundation, showing results of a low-fat low-glycemic index vegan diet based on ADA guidelines. And he shared results of actual patients who had lost significant weight, were able to stop taking diabetes medications and experienced other physical improvements through changing their diet.
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  3. #103
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    Default Re: Animal products and diabetes

    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  4. #104
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    Default Re: Animal products and diabetes

    From International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics today:

    Animal fat and cholesterol linked to increased gestational diabetes risk

    "The researchers compared the prevalence of gestational diabetes across five categories split according to how many calories the women received from eating animal fat and cholesterol.

    People in the highest quintile for animal fat consumption were almost twice as likely to develop gestational diabetes than those in the lowest group, while those who ate the most cholesterol experienced around a 45 per cent increase in risk."

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