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Thread: Meat and other diseases (other than CVD, cancer, arthritis and diabetes)

  1. #1
    gertvegan's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Meat and other diseases (other than CVD, cancer, arthritis and diabetes)

    Warning Labels on Meat? The Herald, March 30 2004

    Come clean on killer meat says MICHAEL MANSFIELD QC - The Big Idea: Warning labels on meat

    How should drug pedlars be treated? Currently they are quoted on the stock exchange, legitimised by having worthies on their board of directors and are allowed to sell their products on every high street. All the recreational drugs lumped together manage to kill around 600 people a year in the UK, but tobacco terminates at least 120,000 lives and destroys the health of thousands more. Despite that carnage, it took 50 years simply to get a warning label stuck on packets of cigarettes. Why did it take so long? Read On.

    Corruption of science, huge financial power, generous political lobbying and tame journalists – all the techniques subsequently mastered and applied by the meat industry, which kills probably even more people than the tobacco companies. If it is necessary to have a government health warning on tobacco, then it is equally necessary to slap a similarly strong-worded caution on all meat products – and dairy for that matter. And it should contain several warnings.
    The latest anti-smoking proposal is to include, with the verbal warnings, pictures of diseased lungs or cancerous tongues. For meat it should be the terrified lamb having its throat cut or the diseased and dejected animals in the squalor and filth of an intensive pig farm. And if a "scratch and sniff" panel could be incorporated, so much the better.
    The past 20 years have seen a swelling avalanche of science identifying meat and animal products as the major cause of modern degenerative diseases – the so-called diseases of affluence. Heart disease, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, some cancers, bone diseases such as osteoporosis and a string of other ailments are all caused or made worse by animal products.
    In 1990, the World Health Organisation issued a report that should have caused a storming of the Meat and Livestock Commission and a revolution in agriculture. Instead, it aroused as much press interest as Iain Duncan Smith's speaking tour. It said: "Diets associated with increases in chronic diseases are those rich in sugar, meat and other animal products, saturated (animal) fat and dietary cholesterol. If such trends continue, the end of this century will see cardiovascular disease and cancer established as major health problems in every country in the world." It went on to say: "The objectives in this report can be expected to meet with considerable opposition."
    If you believe that governments would never bend the knee to lobbying and place commercial interests above those of human survival, remember BSE. "Beef is perfectly safe to eat," they said – and set up a committee to investigate it which included no experts in that particular field. That's always a good starting point to avoid discovering the truth. So, the first warning on all meat products should be: "Meat can increase your risk of cancer, heart and other degenerative diseases and reduce your life expectancy."
    Most animals killed for meat – pigs, chickens, turkeys and ducks – are reared in obscene, overcrowded concentration camps which mostly condemn them to spend their lives on filthy concrete or faeces-soaked litter (and there are plenty of problems with the so-called free-range animals as well). They are unable to fulfil most of their powerfully-ingrained natural instincts. The result, in the case of pigs, can be mental collapse. No-one is certain with poultry because they are not deemed important enough to investigate. Just as the Nazis turned irony into a sick joke with the words Arbeit Mach Frei above the gates of Auschwitz, and the Americans did with the words "Honour bound to defend freedom" over the gates of Guantanamo Bay's Camp Delta, so the meat industry plays a similar game with its constant claims of "the best animal welfare standards in the world". It's a lie – they know it's a lie, we know and the animals know. The second warning should therefore say: "This product comes from animals which have been physically and mentally tortured."
    So good are the welfare standards in these disease-ridden dens that antibiotics and a barrage of other drugs are regularly administered – often on a daily basis – to keep death from disease under some kind of control. And just for good measure, they administer even more antibiotics to make the animals grow unnaturally fast.
    The outcome was entirely predictable and the world is now faced with deadly antibiotic-resistant strains of e-coli, salmonella and campylobacter.
    So the third warning should be: "This product may kill you and your children with diseases for which we are rapidly running out of antidotes."
    Meat constitutes the largest industry on earth but despite its wealth, receives massive subsidies to assist, among other things, its pillaging of the developing world. Despite Britain – and most other European countries – devoting most of its lands to grazing animals and growing their feed, it is not enough. Ninety per cent of all protein supplements are imported from the developing world at rock-bottom prices – often the same countries suffering from starvation. An area of prime agricultural land the size of Britain, France, Italy and New Zealand is used to grow high-quality food to feed to Europe's farmed animals in an exercise of wanton vandalism.
    It takes an average of 10kg of vegetable protein to produce just 1kg of meat in an insanely wasteful production line of misery. The West's addiction to dead animals is not just destroying its health but it is causing starvation, insecurity and death among the poorest people in the world. The fourth warning should be: "Buying this product will contribute to the death of 12 million children each year from starvation-linked diseases."
    And there is a fifth caution. Despite warnings of impending environmental disaster from every knowledgeable source, the industry/military/ agricultural power brokers are deaf to all reason. They have to keep growing or collapse and this growth is quite literally destroying the globe. We all know it and do very little about it. Diet is the easiest way to have an immediate impact as livestock production and the growing of fodder to feed them is at the heart of every environmental problem – spreading deserts, deforestation, soil erosion, global warming, acid rain, the overuse of water and water pollution. So the fifth warning should read: "If you want to contribute to destroying your children's future – enjoy."
    Just as the tobacco industry is still trying to present its products as somehow acceptable and the evidence against it as imperfect, so the meat industry is pushing meat through every avenue it can – and it has some powerful allies. A couple of months ago, the Who issued a report calling on governments worldwide to promote healthy eating by encouraging people to increase the amount of fresh fruit and vegetables they eat. George Bush's administration responded by saying that this was poor science and there was no such thing as good and bad foods – just personal responsibility.
    Enough said. You know that if Mr Bush is opposed to something, it's probably right.

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    Interesting article, i think the amount of farm land in the UK set aside for animals or growing feed for animals is 85%.

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    Question Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    i have a friend who has schizophrenia and until recently was a vegetarian. she's 23 and hadn't eaten meat for 9 years. i thought for a while she might consider veganism as she's done vegan raw food diets before to lose weight, and she said she'd think about being vegan full-time.

    suddenly though, she's decided that she needs meat protein to help her schizophrenia. she thinks that plant protein doesn't have the right components and that meat is cheaper for the amount and quality of protein it provides. she says she feels better every time she eats meat.

    she said she was worried about telling me and of course i'm not going to stop being her friend because of this (i have some meat-eating friends and family anyway) but i told her i didn't agree with her change of heart. i don't want to nag her and i want her to be as healthy as possible, but i'm unsure how to help her realise that meat won't improve her condition. she says she's been eating things like frankfurters and sausages which aren't even 'good quality' meat, when before she ate loads of beans and lentils so she was getting plenty of protein as a vegetarian. she did eat a lot of dairy though, and she's a little overweight.

    her parents are happy she's eating meat again as they were never very veg-friendly, and her mum was especially happy with the timing because she didn't want to have to cook a veggie alternative to their Christmas turkey.

    it hasn't made me think any less of her, but it's a bit upsetting for me. i'm not really sure what to do. i'm concerned about her health as well as obviously the animals. i haven't been able to find many good links on the internet that i could point her to so far.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Gorilla, she sounds like she was perhaps looking for a reason to continue eating meat. It's unfortunate that she did not feel the need to give you "proof" of her need for animal protein yet your are compelled to find proof otherwise for her. The only food I know of to probably avoid in schizophrenia is corn (I have an in-law who has had the illness for 30 years so this info is probably old. Goodness knows he won't even give up corn ingredients in food, much less animal).
    Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    perhaps she's just making excuses to eat meat again, but she says she feels guilty because she knows how awful the industry it is. however she's telling herself that it's like the medication she has to take - it's cruel but she needs it to be healthy.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Where has she read that? It is maybe a bit easier to argue if we know the reason behind her arguments?
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Unfortunately I don't think you can really argue with the claim that she feels better when she eats meat, because it is not something that can be proved either way. I imagine there is no scientific evidence that meat helps schizophrenia but that won't convince her that she doesn't feel better, and there is the usual difficulty of proving a negative.

    FWIW there's a bit about nutrition and mental health if you google. For example, this article http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/press/preleases/pr/pr_539.htm makes tentative links between schizophrenia and nutrition at a national level, implying that dairy produce is bad for it and fish is good for it - presumably they didn't consider flax oil consumption

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    thanks harpy, you're right that i can't prove she doesn't feel better because of eating meat - it's a totally subjective thing, and even if it's psychosomatic, she still believes it's helping.

    thanks for the link, i did do a Google search before but what i found wasn't very helpful. my friend has always eaten a lot of dairy and i don't think she's cut down recently, she tends to binge on things like cream, ice cream and chocolate quite often. she's started taking fish oil because she didn't think flaxseed oil was helping.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Yes, but the problem is if she feel more guilty for eating meat, then she also have a negative effect o her mental health. Would have been nice if it was possible to find something that was vegan, and worked against the schizophrenia.

    Regarding the fish oil, yes, it is not unlikely that she can hade advantages of a DHA supplement, but that is possible to get from algae’s.

    Some amino acids is claimed to work against certain mental conditions, worth looking into?
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Gorilla's friend could try the algae-based supplements, though I think they work out more expensive than the fish ones so it will depend how committed she is (and how much money she's got).

    Gorilla, I wonder if your friend actually wants to be veg*n or do you think she was mostly doing it to please you? I think you are right to be cautious about trying to change her mind, particularly as she's in a fragile state. You are doing your best already by telling her how you feel and sharing any relevant information.

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    vegan pizza! thecatspajamas1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    How does schitzophrenia have anything to do with protein? I thought it was related to dopamine levels.

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    I was looking it up online, and I found a lot of info about schizophrenia and a specific protein. However, the lack of this specific protein ("reelin") is caused by the fact that a piece of DNA is missing- the piece of DNA that would normally manufacture this protein.

    Your friend needs to understand that we don't get whole proteins by eating them. When we eat protein, they are broken down by digestion into amino acids, and then they are rebuilt into whatever proteins the DNA directs. This may be the confusion your friend is having- she thinks she can eat more protein and obtain more of this specific one, but it's not going to happen. Only by altering her genes could she produce more reelin.

    Here are some links:
    http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/c.../full/38/24/15
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/upi/inde...nalprotein.xml
    http://www.schizophrenia.com/sznews/...es/001540.html

    I also came across some equally interesting information- that drinking milk can lead to schiziphrenia for certain individuals:
    http://www.mercola.com/1999/archive/..._to_autism.htm

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Quote thecatspajamas1
    How does schitzophrenia have anything to do with protein? I thought it was related to dopamine levels.
    I have no idea.

    I don’t have good information about schizophrenia at all, but I do have a omni acquaintance whit suspected schizophrenia and she also claims that certain types of meat calms her down. The only thing I have been able to find out she gets from what she eats because of the whatever-it-is in her brain is protein and iron. She has also more or less permanent iron deficiency.

    Regarding the algae, I don’t know the costs compared to fish, and I have little knowledge of prices of anything in UK. But if anyone is interested: http://www.healthspan.co.uk/shop/product.aspx?Id=CERE
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    baffled harpy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Are those ones vegan? They seem to contain glycerine, which may be animal-derived although it isn't always.

    These ones are certified by the Vegan Society http://www.gvtc.co.uk/deva/omega3dha.html (they claim) but are slightly dearer (even allowing for the fact they are meant to have more of the active ingredient). However both kinds are considerably cheaper than the ones I bought a few months ago!

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Ouch! Now I am not sure, I got the link from another forum, and come to think of it because it was a UK company. Ordered the DEVA product from http://veganessentials.com/ so I didn’t think about that it could be in an UK shop (haven’t got any sleep for over 24 hours, my brain is not 100 %).
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    Me and Jilli take Omega oil. I get it from 'goodness direct'. I'm not sure who makes it though.

    Your friend would be better advised to give up dairy rather then go back to dead animals. Maybe if she knows how yummy vegan icecream is now she won't mind so much.

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    my friend has very little money because she's on disability benefit due to her illness. she'd never shell out for vegan DHA or dairy-free ice cream. she was a vegetarian for nine years and i've only known her for about six months, so it's not as if she gave up meat because of me.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    I see - so she probably really does feel a bit guilty, then. FWIW I guess what I'd do in the circs is just try to be generally supportive of the friend, as it wouldn't help to make her feel any guiltier

    You never know, if she gets a bit better for whatever reason she may rethink her decision.

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    gorillagorilla Gorilla's Avatar
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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    true, i'm not trying to make her feel guilty, in fact we've hardly spoken about it since she told me. i don't want to make her feel any worse.

    thanks for the links catspajamas, the possible genetic link with mental illness sounds plausible, especially as it often seems to run in families.
    'The word gorilla was derived from the Greek word Gorillai (a "tribe of hairy women")'

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    Default Re: Meat Protein and Schizophrenia

    I remember having a look at a book about celiac disease, which I think I might have - I posted a link to a naan bread recipe yestarday, but do now avoid wheat myself - and it suggested a possible link between that and schizophrenia. This is something that I've found on the internet and it also says that a lot of celiacs have a dairy intolerance:

    "Celiacs cannot digest the gluten contained in many grains. The body looks on it as a poison and starts an autoimmune response that damages the intestinal wall. Symptoms are bloated, inflamed stomach and intestine, diarrhea and/or chronic constipation, joint pain, headaches, belching repetitively, less often vomiting. There is a skin rash called Dermatits Herpetiformas that some people get which consists of itchy lesions on buttocks, scalp, elbow and knees. Creams make it worse and it only clears up if you go on a gluten free diet. A lot of celiacs have a dairy intolerance. Untreated celiac disease has been linked with diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, neurological problems, numb hands and feet, scizophrenia, central nervous system deterioration and lymphoma. Go to www.delphiforums.com click on Health and wellness, Celiac disease forum will be on next page and you can sign on as a guest to a forum just like this with celiac sufferers offering a wealth of information. cheers, Orla"

    http://www.healthyawareness.com/_Arc...5/000002df.htm

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    Default Bacon linked to lung disease

    Hoorah Vegans 1,255,489 - Meaters 0

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/6560121.stm

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    Default Re: Bacon linked to lung disease

    Red wine on the other hand...

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3217527.stm

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    Default Re: Bacon linked to lung disease

    Hmm. Can't feel pleased about people getting lung disease, but less bacon consumption would be good news for both people and pigs.

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    Default Re: Bacon linked to lung disease

    Yes, you're quite right, I wasn't laughing at the lung disease part, just the extra argument in the vegan corner. Our work have started doing breakfasts (bacon sarnies, or veggie or vegan sausages). Next time people tuck into their bacon and say how good it tastes, I'll just send 'em that link

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    Default Re: Bacon linked to lung disease

    Good idea, though there might be some competition for the vegan sausages after that

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    Default Re: Bacon linked to lung disease

    It's already started! They sold out yesterday and the woman forgot to get more for this morning I'm starving!!

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    Default Hot Dogs and Bacon Cause Increased Risk for Lung Disease

    More ammunition...

    Hot Dogs and Bacon Cause Increased Risk for Lung Disease

    A new study finds that eating cured meats is associated with an increased risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Researchers analyzed the consumption of cured meat products (bacon, hot dogs, and other processed meats) in 42,915 men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Those men consuming cured meats daily had more than two and half times the risk for COPD compared with those consuming these products rarely or never. The researchers speculate that cured meat may aggravate the effect of smoking on risk for COPD.


    Varraso R, Jiang R, Barr G, Willett WC, and Camargo CA. Prospective Study of Cured Meats Consumption and Risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Men. Am J Epidemiol. 2007. Published online September 4, 2007.


    For information about nutrition and health, please visit www.pcrm.org/.
    Breaking Medical News is a service of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, 5100 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20016.
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    Default Article: Chicken - the unhealthy option


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    Default Higher Red Meat Intake Associated With Higher Blood Pressure

    Higher Red Meat Intake Associated With Higher Blood Pressure.


    This is well researched and recently published by the British Medical Journal.

    It is quite a long article – too much to post here, however if you wish to read through the whole doc – please go to:

    http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/...f72f8ecbdcbe66

    Published 15 July 2008, doi:10.1136/bmj.a258
    Cite this as: BMJ 2008;337:a258

    Otherwise, I’ve pulled and highlighted several areas below.

    Research
    Relation of iron and red meat intake to blood pressure: cross sectional epidemiological study

    Abstract
    Objective To investigate associations of dietary iron (total, haem, and non-haem), supplemental iron, and red meat with blood pressure.

    Design Cross sectional epidemiological study.
    Setting 17 population samples from Japan, China, the United Kingdom, and the United States participating in the international collaborative study on macro-/micronutrients and blood pressure (INTERMAP).

    Participants 4680 adults aged 40-59.

    Main outcome measure Average of eight blood pressure readings.

    Results In multiple linear regression analyses dietary total iron and non-haem iron were consistently inversely associated with blood pressure. With adjustment for potential non-dietary and dietary confounders, dietary total iron intake higher by 4.20 mg/4.2 MJ (2 SD) was associated with –1.39 mm Hg (P<0.01) lower systolic blood pressure. Dietary non-haem iron intake higher by 4.13 mg/4.2 MJ (2 SD) was associated with –1.45 mm Hg (P<0.001) lower systolic blood pressure. Differences were smaller for diastolic blood pressure. In most models haem iron intake from food was positively, non-significantly associated with blood pressure. Iron intake from combined diet and supplements yielded smaller associations than dietary iron alone. Red meat intake was directly associated with blood pressure; 102.6 g/24 h (2 SD) higher intake was associated with 1.25 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure. Associations between red meat and blood pressure persisted after adjustment for multiple confounders.

    Conclusion Non-haem iron has a possible role in the prevention and control of adverse blood pressure levels. An unfavourable effect of red meat on blood pressure was observed. These results need confirmation including in prospective studies, clinical trials, and from experimental evidence on possible mechanisms.


    Haem iron showed direct weak associations with blood pressure. Haem iron is found mainly in red meat, poultry, and seafood; it is a major component of total iron intake in Western diets. Its association with blood pressure probably reflects the adverse relation of meat intake to blood pressure observed in the present and previous studies.36 37 38 In our study this relation persisted after controlling for multiple confounders, including fatty acids, animal protein, and haem iron; previous studies gave no such data on potential confounders.

    The inclusion of dietary total iron intake from foods and supplements yielded similar, although attenuated, data on relation to blood pressure, compared with findings for food iron alone. This result may have implications, since it has been shown that with daily iron supplementation, iron absorption in healthy people was adapted by decreasing the absorption of non-haem iron (but not haem iron) from food.39 High iron stores may contribute to the risk of disease through iron catalysed formation of reactive forms of oxygen free radicals and through altered cellular function40; therefore, self supplementation of iron should be discouraged without clinical assessment of iron status, especially for populations replete with iron, such as in the United States.41

    Limitations
    Limitations of this study include dietary assessments dependent on reporting by participants (subject to systematic and non-systematic errors), variation among food tables of different countries, and variability in daily dietary intake. All these factors are expected to produce underestimated relations of nutrients and food groups to blood pressure. To minimise these potential errors we used extensive quality control procedures, standardisation of food tables across countries, and repeated 24 hour dietary recalls and urine collections. Iron intakes estimated by the 24 hour recall method are unbiased compared with a study that used the weighed dietary intake method over 16 days.42 Although a degree of misclassification of nutrient intakes, based on four 24 hour recalls, is present (as with all dietary assessment methods), non-differential misclassification would most likely reduce observed associations between iron and blood pressure (although the opposite might be true in some cases).43 44 All data are cross sectional, thus long term influences of dietary factors on blood pressure may be underestimated. Causality cannot be inferred. Despite the comprehensive adjustment for confounders in our analyses, we cannot exclude the possibility of residual confounding by related dietary or other variables.

    Conclusions
    We found an inverse association of dietary total iron intake and non-haem iron intake with blood pressure. A weak direct association between haem iron and blood pressure was observed, probably reflecting the adverse relation of red meat consumption to blood pressure. Higher red meat intake was independently associated with higher blood pressure, including after control for fatty acids, animal protein, and haem iron consumption. These findings need to be tested in other populations, clinical trials, and experimental studies.
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    Default Re: Higher Red Meat Intake Associated With Higher Blood Pressure

    Interesting, Frank, but frustrating for me. I have high BP but have not eaten meat nor any meat products for a good 40 years. One thing ignored with the study you quote, is inheritance through genes. The same thing applies to Type 2 diabetes, which my uncles etc all had, and now I have. I read that it is a lifestyle thing such as overweight, overeating etc. Again, what about inheritance? I've come to the conclusion that it is necessary to choose one's parents very carefully!
    Eve

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    Default Re: Higher Red Meat Intake Associated With Higher Blood Pressure

    Ha ha!

    I thought all Type II diabetes was curable through diet/lifestyle?

    What do you think causes your high blood pressure?

    My sister has kidney problems and this causes very high blood pressure for her. She is not vegan but rarely eats meat.

    So - yes - this report is another nail in the coffin of red meat - but high blood pressure can be caused by other conditions too.
    I Think, Therefore I Am A Vegan

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    Default Re: Higher Red Meat Intake Associated With Higher Blood Pressure

    Hi Frank
    As to Diabetes type 2, my very careful lifestyle ensures that I don't get the usual symptoms, and I'm not on medication. But the condition is still lurking in the background. Although I was vegan before the diagnosis, yet I was eating the wrong sort of fruit, such as too much watermelon and pineapple which gave me a 'rush' and then a downer. The doc told me to stick to boring fruits like apples and pears, which is no problem, just not so tasty! He also recommended low GI grains - no more tasty rolls, which were only occasional. The ophthalmologist tells me to eat plenty of leafy greens, and he always shows me the 'photos' he takes of the back of my eyes. This reveals the veins etc that should be straight and not kinked like the watering hose that blocks the water getting thru. In this case it can cause problems for the blood flow. He is a first class bloke, and said that diabetes 2 is a condition affecting all the small veins. After all, more leg amputations are from diabetes than from road accidents.

    I don't know about your sister's kidney probs, but my last annual blood tests revealed that my kidneys are down to 60 percent effiicient. I asked the doc what I can do to improve that, but he laughingly suggested I become younger! Of course as we age, our bodies become less efficient.

    You ask what causes my high blood pressure, well your guess is as good as mine, but as my father and his brothers all had high BP, I believe that's the source of the problem.
    Eve

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    Default Re: Higher Red Meat Intake Associated With Higher Blood Pressure

    My sister's kidney capacity is around 20% I guess.

    She's just turned 40.

    She will need dialysis.
    I Think, Therefore I Am A Vegan

  34. #34
    I eve's Avatar
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    Default Re: Higher Red Meat Intake Associated With Higher Blood Pressure

    Really sorry about that, Frank. Obviously your sister as well as you will know all the questions to ask; I just hope for her sake that there can be a good improvement so that she will not need dialysis.
    Eve

  35. #35
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Farmed meat main source of campylobacteriosis

    Farmed meat main source of campylobacteriosis: study

    26-Sep-2008 - A new study has found that nearly all of the campylobacteriosis cases in the patients evaluated were caused by bacteria in animals farmed for meat, in particular chicken and cattle.
    Researchers from the US and the UK sequenced the DNA of bacteria collected from 1,231 patients in Lancashire, England and compared it to Campylobacter jejuin DNA sequences collected from wild and domestic animals and the environment.
    Camplylobacter jejuni causes more cases of gastroenteritis in the developed world than any other bacterial pathogen, including E. coli, Salmonella, Clostridium and Listeria combined, claims the study.
    According to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), Camplylobacter is the most frequently reported animal infection transmissible to humans, with over 175,000 sufferers in the EU in 2006 (46 cases for every 100,000 people).
    Wild and domestic animals act as natural reservoirs for the disease, claims the study, and it can also survive in water and soil, but the researchers said that recent studies had contradicted the idea that livestock are the main reservoir for human disease.

    Findings
    However, the findings of this study, published in the journal, PloS Genetics, found that in 57 per cent of the cases, the bacteria could be traced to chicken, and in 35 per cent to cattle.
    The team said that wild animal and environmental sources accounted for just three per cent of the cases studied.
    More here.

  36. #36
    CATWOMAN sandra's Avatar
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    Default Re: Farmed meat main source of campylobacteriosis

    Campylobacter is also the cause of many stomach ulcers.
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  37. #37
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    Default Re: Farmed meat main source of campylobacteriosis

    It's also another pathogen that keeps getting stronger due to the misuse of antibiotics in treatment etc.

    Because many of the bacteria that infect farm animals are similar to those that infect humans, the widespread use of antibiotics in agribusiness contributes significantly to the development of resistant bacterial strains that can cross over to humans. For example, six years ago, fluoroquinolone, the antibiotic most commonly used to treat the most common form of food poisoning in humans (Campylobacter infection), was approved for use in poultry. At the time of approval, bacterial resistance to the drug was slight, but today one in six cases of Campylobacter infection cannot be killed by fluoroquinolone.

    Antibiotics are also misused in human populations.
    http://www.lhsfna.org/index.cfm?obje...98E765EF7BEC83

  38. #38
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Too much red meat leads to vision loss: study

    Too much red meat leads to vision loss: study

    A link has been found between eating too much red meat and vision loss.

    Researchers from the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital have found people who eat red meat more than 10 times a week experience increased macular degen-eration, leading to vision loss.

    The link was stronger for people who ate high levels of salami and continental sausage, but weaker for people who ate more chicken.

    Report author Dr Elaine Chong it shows people should be aware of how much red meat they eat.

    "Everything in moderation is the answer," she said.

    "I guess when looking at the study we actually found that a quarter of the study population ate more than 10 serves of red meat a week which is quite substantial ... it's also like two serves of red meat a day," she said.

    "What we found was that excessive meat intake - more than 10 serves of red meat per week - was associated with about a 47 per cent increased association of early and late macular degeneration."

    Reference: ABC Australia News.
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  39. #39
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Red meat may help toxins stick in the body: Study

    Red meat may help toxins stick in the body: Study


    By Stephen Daniells, 30-Oct-2008

    A molecule present in red meat may increase a human's susceptibility to food poisoning, suggests a new study in the journal Nature.

    A molecule called N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), a type of glycan, helps a toxin from certain types of E. coli to target human cells, according to a team of international researchers.

    "Ironically, humans may set themselves up for an increased risk of illness from this kind of E. coli bacteria present in contaminated red meat or dairy, because these very same products have high-levels of Neu5Gc," said researcher Ajit Varki from the University of California, San Diego. "The Neu5Gc molecule is absorbed into the body, making it a target for the toxin produced by E. coli."

    The researchers report that sites where Neu5Gc has been incorporated into the human body are related to binding of a bacterial toxin called subtilase cytotoxin. "When the toxin binds to the non-human Neu5Gc receptors, it can result in serious food-poisoning and other symptoms in humans," said Varki.

    The research also highlights the processing of dairy and meat should destroy the bacteria. Humans do not naturally produce Neu5Gc.

    Building the science
    Varki and his colleagues at the UC San Diego reported five years ago how Neu5Gc is absorbed into human tissues as a result of eating red meat and milk products.

    The study was reportedly the first to investigate human dietary absorption of the Neu5Gc glycans found naturally in red meats.

    "Ironically, foods rich in Neu5Gc are the most common source of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli contamination," wrote the researchers. "Thus a bacterial toxin's receptor is generated by metabolic incorporation of an exogenous factor derived from food."

    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, and by Australia's National Health and Medical Research Council.

    Red meat concerns
    Red meat has been the subject of unfavourable reports concerning a potential link to increased risks of certain cancers.

    According to results from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly the American Association for Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study, a high intake of red and processed meats was associated with a 20 per cent increase in the risk of lung and colorectal cancer.

    Moreover, a study from the World Cancer Research Fund's (WCRF) concluded that high consumption of red and processed meat was associated with a 30 per cent increase in the risk of colorectal cancer.

    Source: Nature
    Published online ahead of print, 29 October 2008, doi: 10.1038/nature07428
    "Incorporation of a non-human glycan mediates human susceptibility to a bacterial toxin"
    Authors: E. Byres, A.W. Paton, J.C. Paton, J.C. Lofling, D.F. Smith, M.C.J. Wilce, U.M. Talbot, D.C. Chong, H. Yu, S. Huang, X. Chen, N.M. Varki, A. Varki, J. Rossjohn, T. Beddoe.

    Reference: Food Navigator News.
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

  40. #40
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Resistant urinary tract infections linked to meat consumption

    Resistant urinary tract infections linked to meat consumption
    March 10 2008

    UCS Science Report
    A new study indicates that women suffering from urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by drug-resistant E. coli bacteria reported eating more chicken and pork than women whose UTIs were easily treated with antibiotics.

    This study adds to the evidence that UTIs are antibiotic-resistant diseases originating in animals that can be passed to people through meat consumption. According to a UCS report, 70 percent of the antibiotics and related drugs in the United States are used to promote growth and ward off disease in livestock that are not sick. This practice creates an ideal breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant diseases.

    Read the study abstract in Foodborne Pathogens & Disease, or read more about antibiotics from UCS.

    Reference: Union Of Concerned Scientists.
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  41. #41
    Ex-admin Korn's Avatar
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    Default Seeing vegan: New study correlates meat eating with cataract risk

    http://www.thisdishisvegetarian.com/...orrelates.html
    What are cataracts?
    Cataracts refers to "a clouding of the lens of the eye, which obstructs the passage of light and leads to vision loss if left untreated." The disease is "an important cause of low vision in both developed and developing countries," and "age-related cataract is responsible for 48% of the world's blindness."

    About the study
    Scientists recruited 27,670 healthy, non-diabetic participants in the UK to determine their diet as well as their rate of cataracts. Participants were divided into six diet groups, ranging from high-, medium-, and low-meat eaters, to fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans.

    Results
    After adjusting for several non-dietary factors such as age, smoking, ethnicity, and blood pressure, the results indicated a direct correlation between animal products in the diet and cataract risk.

    When compared to high meat eaters (people whose average daily meat consumption was 100 grams or more), fish eaters had a 20% lower risk for cataracts, vegetarians had a 30% lower risk, and vegans had a whopping 40% lower risk of the disease.
    The report can be found at PubMed.
    I will not eat anything that walks, swims, flies, runs, skips, hops or crawls.

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